Bessacarr

Bessacarr (/ˈbɛsəkər/)[1] is the south-east edge of Doncaster, South Yorkshire, England. Bessacarr is mostly private residential development from the 1960s onward. Bessacarr is largely interwoven with Cantley to the north-east having partially signposted ancient boundaries, upon which its population was approximately 19,803 at the 2001 census.[2]

Bessacarr
Bessacarr shopping centre, Stoops Lane - geograph.org.uk - 1214899

Tall sloped willow and straight tree and Stoops Lane shops in early spring.
And then the heavens opened (geograph 3998457)

Footpath across Warren Golf Course, Bessacarr
Bessacarr is located in South Yorkshire
Bessacarr
Bessacarr
Location within South Yorkshire
Population19,803 Doncaster MBC study of 2001 census areas forming Bessacarr's early 20th century boundary
OS grid referenceSE6101
• London140 mi (230 km) S by SE
Metropolitan borough
Metropolitan county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townDONCASTER
Postcode districtDN4
Dialling code01302
PoliceSouth Yorkshire
FireSouth Yorkshire
AmbulanceYorkshire
EU ParliamentYorkshire and the Humber
UK Parliament

Localities

West Bessacarr

The bulk of Bessacarr is often known as West Bessacarr and is south of Bawtry Road. A small minority of the neighbourhood was built in the 1930s or earlier, the majority of the building occurred in the 1960s and 70s. Some recent development has occurred in the late 1990s and into the 21st century. Apartments are a feature of the most recent developments.

Nostell Place includes a Doctor's surgery, veterinary surgery, pharmacist, Co-Operative food store, bakery, hairdresser, hardware store, fish and chip shop and Chinese takeaway amongst others. Nearby is the Flying Childers public house, St Francis of Assisi Anglican Church, Bessacarr Library and Willow Primary School. Some other shops, including an off-licence and a hairdresser / beautician, are further up Alston Road around the corner from Punch's Hotel. Doncaster Lawn Tennis Club is on Saxton Avenue and is accessible via a footpath from Ellers Road.

West Bessacarr is part of the cycle path from Doncaster to Rossington, known locally as "the red path" owing to the colour of its tarmac. Routes including the red path and others within Bessacarr can lead walkers and cyclists to the relatively newly developed area known as Lakeside. Public transport to and from Bessacarr is provided by First Mainline routes 58 and 55B, with the direct 89 bus through the estates being withdrawn in 2004. Primary education for the area is provided by the excellent Bessacarr Primary School including its own nursery and by another called Willow Primary School, both of which feed into the local Hall Cross lower school, formally Ellers Middle School, next to the north-west boundary.

Bessacarr Grange

Bessacarr Grange is a largely 1990s neighbourhood south of the M18 Motorway with some of its own amenities including Yorkshire Wildlife Park accessed by Warning Tongue Lane.

Politics

Bessacarr is currently the name of the ward which as such undergoes boundary and name reviews every eight to twelve years theoretically to avoid malapportionment. Elections are held all-out from 1999 every four years. For the 2015 term the ward is served by one Conservative and two Labour members. The 2014 election of Neil Gethin saw the Labour Party gain a seat for the first time since 1997.[3] The 2015 election saw the first ethnic minority Councillors in Doncaster's history, Majid Khan, for the Bessacarr Ward and Councillor Rachael Blake, for the Rossington Ward.[4] The Conservatives gained a seat in Bessacarr in 2015.

Finningley ward would on a historic synthesis and real-politik critique of the first past the post system be considered a set of three Conservative 'safe seats' and currently includes all bar the latest developed areas of Cantley as well as Bessacarr Grange.

Demography

2011 Published Statistics: Population, home ownership and extracts from Physical Environment, surveyed in 2005[5]
Output area Homes owned outright Owned with a loan Socially rented Privately rented Other km² green spaces km² roads km² water km² domestic gardens km² domestic buildings km² non-domestic buildings Usual residents km²
Bessacarr and Cantley ward 2,338 2,085 898 876 130 2.76 0.69 0.21 1.90 0.46 0.08 14,408 6.72

Around 40% of Bessacarr is in Finningley Ward which had the following land use and housing statistics in 2011:

2011 Published Statistics: Population, home ownership and extracts from Physical Environment, surveyed in 2005[5]
Output area Homes owned outright Owned with a loan Socially rented Privately rented Other km² green spaces km² roads km² water km² domestic gardens km² domestic buildings km² non-domestic buildings Usual residents km²
Finningley ward 2,633 2,407 435 605 110 38.64 1.04 0.64 2.42 0.61 0.14 15,209 43.42

Notable people

See also

  • Church of St Francis of Assisi, West Bessacarr

References

  1. ^ Wells, John (29 January 2010). "Bessacarr". John Wells's phonetic blog. Retrieved 5 March 2010.
  2. ^ http://www.britishplacenames.co.uk/se6101-bessacarr-doncaster
  3. ^ Council, Doncaster. "Local Elections 2014 - Doncaster Council". www.doncaster.gov.uk. Retrieved 7 May 2017.
  4. ^ Council, Doncaster. "Local Elections 2015 - Doncaster Council". www.doncaster.gov.uk. Retrieved 7 May 2017.
  5. ^ a b Key Statistics: Dwellings; Quick Statistics: Population Density; Physical Environment: Land Use Survey 2005
  6. ^ http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/26349904

External links

  • Media related to Bessacarr at Wikimedia Commons
2010 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election

The 2010 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election took place on 6 May 2010 to elect on third of Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council in South Yorkshire, England as part of the 2010 United Kingdom local elections. The 2010 General Election also took place on the same day.

The election resulted in the Labour Party taking control of the council from No overall control for the first time since 2003 after gaining eight seats overall. After the election, the composition of the council was:

Labour 34

Liberal Democrats 10

Conservative 9

Others 11

2011 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election

The 2011 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election took place on 5 May 2011 to elect one third of Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council as part of the 2011 local elections in the United Kingdom.The election resulted in the Labour Party retaining its control of the council, increasing its majority by seven seats. The Liberal Democrats lost four of the five seats it was defending, all of which were gained by Labour. After the election, the composition of the council was:

Labour 43

Conservative 9

Liberal Democrats 6

Others 5

2012 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election

The 2012 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election took place on 3 May 2012 to elect one third of Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council in South Yorkshire, England. This was on the same day as other 2012 United Kingdom local elections.

The Labour Party retained its control of the council with an increased majority after increasing its vote share by 21.7% and gaining three seats from the Liberal Democrats and five from various independents. The Conservatives held the three seats it was defending with a reduced vote share. After the election, the composition of the council was:

Labour 50

Conservative 9

Liberal Democrats 3

Others 1

2014 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election

The 2014 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election took place on 22 May 2014 as part of the 2014 local elections in the United Kingdom. One third of 63 seats were up for election. The 2014 European Parliament Elections were also held on the same day.

The election resulted in the Labour Party retaining its control of the council, with a slightly reduced majority after losing two seats overall. UKIP won a substantial number of votes at this election, increasing its vote share by 30.5%, but only won a single seat. The Liberal Democrats lost the only seat they were defending. After the election, the composition of the council was:

Labour 48

Conservative 8

UKIP 1

Others 6

2015 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election

The 2015 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election took place on 7 May 2015 to elect all members of Doncaster Council in England. This was on the same day as other local elections. Due to boundary changes all 55 seats were up for election.

The election resulted in the Labour Party retaining control of the council, with a majority of 27 seats.

2017 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election

The 2017 Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council election took place on 4 May 2017 as part of the 2017 local elections in the United Kingdom. The election of the Mayor of Doncaster also took place on the same day. All 55 councillors were elected from 21 wards which returned either two or three councillors each by first-past-the-post voting for a four-year term of office. The election resulted in the Labour Party retaining control of the Council, with an increased majority.Previously, the council was elected by thirds every year except the year in which county council elections took place in other parts of England. In 2015, the whole council was elected due to boundary changes to the wards and it was decided that the whole council would be elected every four years in future from 2017, so that the council elections would coincide with the election of the Mayor of Doncaster in future.

Bessacarr Halt railway station

Bessacarr railway halt was a small halt on the Great Northern and Great Eastern Joint Railway in the suburbs of Doncaster, South Yorkshire, England. It was the first halt south of Doncaster, being just 2.5 miles (4 km) south of the town on the Joint line following a series of flying junctions and a direct connection to the South Yorkshire Joint Railway.

The halt opened in 1912 but did not appear in public timetables and was closed in 1924.

The site of Bessacarr Halt, along with 7 others, was highlighted as a possible "new station" under a report to Doncaster Borough Council in September 2008, with reopening at some future date a possibility.

Cantley, South Yorkshire

Cantley is a civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster in South Yorkshire, England. The village is adjacent to Bessacarr, separated by Bawtry Road. It has a population of 2,830, reducing slightly to 2,817 at the 2011 Census.

Doncaster Central (UK Parliament constituency)

Doncaster Central is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 1997 by Rosie Winterton of the Labour Party. Since 2017 Winterton has served as Second Deputy Chairman of Ways and Means, one of three Deputy Speakers of the House; she is the second MP for the constituency to be a Deputy Speaker, after Harold Walker.

Finningley railway station

Finningley railway station was a railway station built to serve the villages of Finningley and Blaxton, South Yorkshire, England.

High Sheriff of South Yorkshire

The High Sheriff of South Yorkshire is a current High Sheriff title which has existed since 1974. The holder is changed annually every March.For around 1,000 years the entire area of Yorkshire was covered by a single High Sheriff of Yorkshire. After the Local Government Act 1972 the title was split to cover several newly created counties, including South Yorkshire. Within the area Hallamshire had been unique in that it had a High Sheriff of Hallamshire from 1962 until 1974.

Below is a list of the sheriffs.

Lea railway station

Lea railway station was a station in Lea, Lincolnshire, south of Gainsborough. It was opened in 1849 by the Great Northern Railway, closed to passengers in 1957 and closed entirely in 1963.

List of electoral wards in South Yorkshire

This is a list of electoral divisions and wards in the ceremonial county of South Yorkshire in Yorkshire and the Humber. All changes since the re-organisation of local government following the passing of the Local Government Act 1972 are shown. The number of councillors elected for each electoral division or ward is shown in brackets.

List of schools in Doncaster

This is a list of schools in the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster in the English county of South Yorkshire.

Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster

The Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster is a metropolitan borough of South Yorkshire in Yorkshire and the Humber Region of England.

In addition to the town of Doncaster, the borough covers the towns of Mexborough, Conisbrough, Thorne, Bawtry and Tickhill.

The borough was created on 1 April 1974, under the Local Government Act 1972, as a merger of the former county borough of Doncaster along with the urban districts of Adwick le Street, Bentley with Arksey, Conisbrough, Mexborough, Tickhill along with Doncaster Rural District and Thorne Rural District, the parish of Finningley from East Retford Rural District and small parts of the parish of Harworth from Worksop Rural District from Nottinghamshire.

St Wilfrid's Church, Cantley

St Wilfrid's Cantley is a Grade II* listed church in Doncaster in South Yorkshire, England, and serves as the parish church for the areas of Cantley, Bessacarr and Branton. It is a traditionalist Anglo-Catholic church within the Church of England.

Traitor's Blood

Traitor's Blood is a novel by Reginald Hill, the author best known for his Dalziel and Pascoe series of crime novels.The novel, originally published in the UK in 1983, moves between Venezuela, England and Moscow and involves a disgraced peer, Lemuel Stanhope-Swift, sixth Viscount Bessacarr, and his attempt to return home to die.

Walkeringham railway station

Walkeringham railway station was a station in Walkeringham, Nottinghamshire. The station closed in 1959 but trains between Gainsborough and Doncaster continue to pass through.

Warren Vale Colliery

Warren Vale Colliery was a coal mine, also known as Piccadilly Colliery, situated alongside Warren Vale Road, between Rawmarsh and Swinton, South Yorkshire, England, in the valley of the Collier Brook, which runs east, for about two miles towards Kilnhurst.

Sinking of the colliery commenced in the late 1840s with production commencing towards the end of 1850. The colliery was owned by Earl Fizwilliam, and was worked by Wakefield–based agents J. & J. Charlesworth & Company. Coal was worked from two seams, the 5 ft. seam was worked at a depth of 90 yards, the 9 ft. seam being found at 127 yards. These seams were connected by a shaft.

The colliery was rail connected to another Charlesworth operation, Kilnhurst Colliery and so to the main line railway (The Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway, Sheffield to Doncaster line). Some small buildings are still standing on the site (2007) and the track of the railway towards Kilnhurst is now a footpath.

Following closure part of the site became the works of Bessacarr Caravans.

Metropolitan districts
Major settlements
Rivers
Topics

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.