Bertie Messitt

Bertie Messitt (28 September 1930 – 18 February 2012)[1] was an Irish long-distance runner. He was educated in Saint Cronan's Boys' National School in Bray. A bus conductor, he won his fourth Irish cross country title in 1961.[2] By the time he had ended his competitive career in 1966, he had recorded 16 Irish records, nine in 1958 alone: 13:44 for three miles, 14:14.8 for 5,000m, 49:33 for 10 miles. He finished 13th in the European Marathon Championships in Belgrade in 1962. His best marathon time, 2:25.39, was set in 1963.[3] He won the Irish marathon championship in 1960, running 2:28:40, qualifying him for the Irish team in the marathon at the 1960 Summer Olympics.

For 12 miles, Bertie led the Olympic's lead pack at a blistering pace. It included Ethiopia's Abebe Bikila, running barefoot, who became the world record-breaking winner, Moroccans Rhadi Ben Abdesselam, the eventual runner up, and Bakir Benaïssa (8th place), as well as Belgium's Aurèle Vandendriessche, the Soviet Union's Sergey Popov, who lost his world record while finishing fifth, and Great Britain's Arthur Keily, who faded to 25th. Messitt, spent from his gallant effort, dropped out at 20 miles.[4][5][6]

Abebe Bikila 1960 Olympics
The 1960 Olympic Marathon lead pack near the 10 km (6 mi) mark, Bikila shadowing the leader Messitt from the rear, then Benaïssa, second, Keily, Vandendriessche who dropped out, and ben Abdesselam.
Bertie Messitt
Personal information
Birth nameAlbert John Messitt
NationalityIrish
Born28 September 1930
Bray, Wicklow, Ireland
Died18 February 2012 (aged 81)
Shankill, Dublin, Ireland
Sport
SportLong-distance running
Event(s)Marathon
ClubDonore

References

  1. ^ "Irish Olympian Messitt passes away". rte.ie. Retrieved 7 March 2012.
  2. ^ [1], Independent.ie, 25 February 2012. Retrieved 10 November 2017.
  3. ^ Great sadness after as Olympian Bertie Messitt laid to rest, Independent.ie, Mary Fogarty, 22 February 2012. Retrieved 4 October 2017.
  4. ^ Maraniss (2008), p. 373–374
  5. ^ "Bertie Messitt Olympic Results". sports-reference.com. Archived from the original on 13 November 2012. Retrieved 7 March 2012.
  6. ^ Messitt's life much more than five-ringed circus, Irish Times, 25 February 2012. Retrieved 4 October 2017.

External links

1956 International Cross Country Championships

The 1956 International Cross Country Championships was held in Belfast, Northern Ireland, at the Royal Ulster Showground on 17 March 1956. In addition, an unofficial women's championship was held the same day at Upminster, England on 17 March 1956. A report on the men's event as well as the women's event was given in the Glasgow Herald.

Complete results for men, and for women (unofficial), medallists,

and the results of British athletes were published.

1957 International Cross Country Championships

The 1957 International Cross Country Championships was held in Waregem, Belgium, at the Hippodroom Waregem on 23 March 1957. In addition, an unofficial women's championship was held one week later at Musselburgh, Scotland on 30 March 1957. A report on the men's event as well as the women's event was given in the Glasgow Herald.

Complete results for men, and for women (unofficial), medallists,

and the results of British athletes were published.

1958 International Cross Country Championships

The 1958 International Cross Country Championships was held in Cardiff, Wales, at the Pontcanna Fields on 22 March 1958. Tunisia entered a team for the first time after gaining independence. A report on the event was given in the Glasgow Herald.Complete results, medallists,

and the results of British athletes were published.

1959 International Cross Country Championships

The 1959 International Cross Country Championships was held in Lisbon, Portugal, at the National Stadium on March 21, 1959. Morocco entered a team for the first time after gaining independence. A report on the event was given in the Glasgow Herald.Complete results, medallists,

and the results of British athletes were published.

1960 International Cross Country Championships

The 1960 International Cross Country Championships was held in Hamilton, Scotland, at the Hamilton Park on 26 March 1960. A report on the event was given in the Glasgow Herald.Complete results, medallists,

and the results of British athletes were published.

1961 International Cross Country Championships

The 1961 International Cross Country Championships was held in Nantes, France, on March 26, 1961. This year, an official junior championship (for athletes under 21 on the day of the race) was introduced. A report on the men's event was given in the Glasgow Herald.Complete results for men, junior men, medallists,

and the results of British athletes were published.

1964 International Cross Country Championships

The 1964 International Cross Country Championships was held in Dublin, Ireland, at the Leopardstown Racecourse on March 21, 1964. A report on the men's event was given in the Glasgow Herald.Complete results for men, junior men, medallists

and the results of British athletes were published.

2012 in Ireland

Events during the year 2012 in Ireland.

Abebe Bikila

Abebe Bikila (Amharic: አበበ ቢቂላ; August 7, 1932 – October 25, 1973) was an Ethiopian marathon runner who was a back-to-back Olympic marathon champion. He won the first gold medal at the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome while running barefoot and the second gold medal at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. He is the first sub-Saharan African Olympic gold medallist. At Tokyo in 1964, Abebe became the first athlete to successfully defend an Olympic marathon title. He was a member of the Ethiopian Imperial Guard, an elite infantry division that safeguarded the Emperor of Ethiopia. Enlisting as a soldier before his athletic career, he rose to the rank of shambel (captain). In Ethiopia, Abebe is formally known as Shambel Abebe Bikila (Amharic: ሻምበል አበበ ቢቂላ).

He was a pioneer in long-distance running. Mamo Wolde, Juma Ikangaa, Tegla Loroupe, Paul Tergat, and Haile Gebrselassie—all recipients of the New York Road Runners' Abebe Bikila Award—are a few of the athletes who have followed in his footsteps to establish East Africa as a force in long-distance running. Abebe participated in a total of sixteen marathons, winning twelve and finishing fifth in the 1963 Boston Marathon. In July 1967, he sustained the first of several sports-related leg injuries that prevented him from finishing his last two marathons.

On March 22, 1969, Abebe was paralysed as a result of a car accident. Although he regained some upper-body mobility, he never walked again. While he was receiving medical treatment in England, Abebe competed in archery and table tennis at the 1970 Stoke Mandeville Games in London. Those Games were an early predecessor of the Paralympic Games. He competed in both sports at a 1971 competition for the disabled in Norway and won its cross-country sleigh-riding event.

Abebe died at age 41 on October 25, 1973, of a cerebral hemorrhage related to his accident four years earlier. He received a state funeral, and Emperor Haile Selassie declared a national day of mourning. Many schools, venues, and events, including Abebe Bikila Stadium in Addis Ababa, are named after him. Abebe is the subject of biographies and films documenting his athletic career, and he is often featured in publications about the marathon and the Olympics.

Arthur Keily

Arthur Patrick Keily (18 March 1921 – 2 March 2016) was a British marathon runner. Originally an amateur footballer, Keily served during the Second World War and, upon his return to England, was placed on the reserve list of his former team and never again made it to the field. He took up long-distance running at the age of 28 and finished twenty-seven marathons during his career, finishing first in eleven of them and on the podium in six more. He set nine world records. After unsuccessful appearances at the 1958 British Empire and Commonwealth Games and the 1960 Summer Olympics, he retired from active competition, but re-entered the sport at the master's level in the 1990s.

Athletics at the 1960 Summer Olympics – Men's marathon

These are the official results of the men's marathon at the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome, Italy, held on Saturday September 10, 1960. There were a total number of 69 participants from 35 nations.

Aurèle Vandendriessche

Aurèle Vandendriessche (born 4 July 1932) is a retired Belgian marathon runner, who won silver medals at the 1962 and 1966 European Championships. He competed at the 1956, 1960 and 1964 Olympics with the best result of seventh place in 1964. Twice winner of the Boston Marathon (1963 and 1964), he recorded his best time there, 2:17:44 in 1965, while finishing fourth.At the 1960 Olympics, Abebe Bikila, followed barefoot at the rear of the lead pack, which was moving at a scorching pace and included Arthur Keily, Bakir Benaïssa, Rhadi Ben Abdesselam who was the reigning world cross-country champion, Bertie Messitt, the marathon world record holder Sergey Popov, and Vandendriessche. Bikila won, setting a world record at 2:15:16.2. After they dispatched the rest of the field by 25 kilometers, Abdesselam stayed with Bikila until the final 500 meters, finishing second at in 2:15:41.6. Vandendriessche abandoned the race. He placed seventh at the 1964 Olympics, where Bikila won again with a new worlds record.

Bakir Benaïssa

Bakir Benaïssa (born 7 April 1931) is a Moroccan former long-distance runner, born in Rabat, who competed in the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome, finishing 8th in the marathon in 2:21:21.4, and in the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo. He won the quadrennial Mediterranean Games marathons in 1959 and 1963.

The blazing start through twelve miles in the 1960 Rome marathon resulted in an eventual world record for winner, Ethiopia's Abebe Bikila, with Benaïssa's teammate, Rhadi Ben Abdesselam, finishing a close second.

Deaths in February 2012

The following is a list of notable deaths in February 2012.

Entries for each day are listed alphabetically by surname. A typical entry lists information in the following sequence:

Name, age, country of citizenship and reason for notability, established cause of death, reference (and language of reference, if not English).

Donore Harriers

Donore Harriers is an athletics club founded in 1893. It is located in Chapelizod, Dublin.

Rhadi Ben Abdesselam

Rhadi Ben Abdesselam (Arabic: راضي بن عبد السلام‎; 28 February 1929 – 4 October 2000) was a Moroccan long-distance runner. He competed at the 1960 Olympics in the marathon and 10,000 meters events.He also ran in the International Cross Country Championships in 1958–1963. In March 1960, he and Belgium's Gaston Roelants quickly broke away from the field, and he became the first African athlete to win the individual gold medal in that event, defeating Roelants by 40 yards.On September 8, 1960, he finished in 14th place in the finals-only 10,000 meters, in 29:32.0, almost a minute behind the winner, the Soviet Union's Pyotr Bolotnikov, who broke the Olympic record for the event.Just two days later, the blazing pace through the first 20 kilometers in the marathon helped result in an eventual world record for the barefoot winner, Ethiopia's Abebe Bikila. After they dispatched the rest of the field by 25 kilometers, the leading pair stayed stride-for-stride until the final 500 meters, with Ben Abdesselam finishing a close second in 2:15:41.6, 25.4 seconds behind Abebe's new world record. Abebe's mark trimmed 8/10ths of a second off Sergei Popov's world record of 2:15:17.0, set in 1958. Ironically, Abebe had been advised to watch out for Ben Abdesselam, but the latter wore his 10,000 meter competition number, so Abebe was unaware of the identity of his pursuer. Popov finished 5th in Rome, two minutes behind New Zealand's Barry Magee, who took the bronze medal.

Saint Cronan's Boys' National School

Saint Cronan's Boys' National School (Irish: Scoil Chrónáin Naofa) is a national school located in Vevay Crescent, just off the Vevay Road in Bray, County Wicklow, Ireland. It is the oldest primary school in Bray, having been founded in 1820 as Bray Male School. The school is named in honour of Saint Cronan, whose feast day falls on 28 April.

There are currently about 500 boys in the school, aged from 6 to 13 years (first through sixth classes).

Shankill, Dublin

Shankill (Irish: Seanchill, meaning "Old Church") is a suburb of Dublin, Ireland, situated in the administrative area of Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown. Located in the south-east of County Dublin, close to the border with County Wicklow, it has a population of 14,257 (2016 census).

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