Bernie Masterson

Bernard Edward Masterson (August 10, 1911 – May 16, 1963) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln from 1946 to 1947, compiling a record of 5–13.[1] Masterson played college football at Nebraska from 1931 to 1933.[2] He played professionally in the National Football League (NFL) with the Chicago Bears from 1934 to 1940.[3]

Bernie Masterson
Bernie Masterson (1946)
Masterson from 1947 Cornhusker
Biographical details
BornAugust 10, 1911
Shenandoah, Iowa
DiedMay 16, 1963 (aged 51)
Chicago, Illinois
Playing career
1931–1933Nebraska
1934–1940Chicago Bears
Position(s)Quarterback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1940Stanford (assistant)
1941UCLA (assistant)
1945St. Mary's Pre-Flight
1946–1947Nebraska
1948NY Yankees (assistant)
1950Iowa (backfield)
1951Lewis (IL)
Head coaching record
Overall5–13

Playing career

Masterson was a three-sport athlete at Lincoln High. He was an all-state back in football, a starter on the 1930 state championship basketball team, and a track star.[4]

Bernie Masterson
Masterson c. 1946

Moving on to the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, he starred from 1931 to 1933 as a back on three straight unbeaten Big Six championship teams. He was selected All-Big Six in 1933.[5]

Masterson played quarterback for the Chicago Bears from 1934 to 1940 when the Bears were known as the "Monsters of the Midway". During his pro career, the Bears were 59–19–3 and were in three NFL championship playoffs. Bernie has an NFL career total of 3,372 passing yards and 35 touchdowns.[6]

Coaching career

In 1940, Clark Shaughnessy hired Masterson to coach Stanford quarterback Frankie Albert.[7] He came back to Nebraska as head football coach for 1946 and 1947. He went 5–13 in the two seasons as head coach.

Death and honors

Masterson died of a heart attack in Chicago on May 16, 1963.[8] He was inducted into the Nebraska Football Hall of Fame in 1977.[5]

Head coaching record

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Nebraska Cornhuskers (Big Six Conference) (1946–1947)
1946 Nebraska 3–6 3–2 T–3rd
1947 Nebraska 2–7 2–3 4th
Nebraska: 5–13 5–5
Total: 5–13

References

  1. ^ "Bernard E. "Bernie" Masterson Records by Year". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved December 1, 2007.
  2. ^ All-Time Football Letterwinners Archived May 12, 2009, at WebCite, University of Nebraska, retrieved August 14, 2010.
  3. ^ Bernie Masterson, Pro Football Reference, retrieved August 14, 2010.
  4. ^ "Nebraska High School Sports Hall of Fame". 2003. Archived from the original on 2007-09-29. Retrieved January 7, 2007.
  5. ^ a b "Huskerpedia". University of Nebraska. Sportspedia, Inc. 1995–2006. Retrieved January 10, 2007.
  6. ^ "databaseFootball.com". Bernie Masterson. databaseSports.com. 2002–2006. Archived from the original on August 25, 2006. Retrieved January 11, 2007.
  7. ^ Ron Fimrite, A Melding Of Men All Suited To A T; Clark Shaughnessy was a dour theoretician, Frankie Albert an unrestrained quarterback and Stanford a team of losers, but combined they forever changed the game of football, Sports Illustrated, September 5, 1977.
  8. ^ "Bernie Masterson, Played Football for Chicago Bears" (PDF). The New York Times. Associated Press. May 17, 1963. Retrieved November 9, 2010.

External links

1936 All-Pro Team

The 1936 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1936 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), the United Press (UP), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the Chicago Daily News (CDN).Four players were selected for the first team by all four selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; Boston Redskins halfback Cliff Battles; Chicago Bears end Bill Hewitt; and Green Bay Packers guard Lon Evans. Three others were selected for the first team by three selectors: Chicago Bears fullback Bronko Nagurski; Boston Redskins tackle Turk Edwards; and New York Giants center Mel Hein.

1936 Chicago Bears season

The 1936 Chicago Bears season was their 17th regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 9–3–0 record and finished in second place in the Western Division behind the Green Bay Packers. After week 10, the Bears were tied with the Packers in first place with identical 9–1 records, having split their season series. However, the club swooned at the end of the year, losing their last two games on the road to Detroit and the Cardinals. Green Bay went on to easily defeat the Boston Redskins and win the NFL title.

1937 Chicago Bears season

The 1937 Chicago Bears season was their 18th regular season completed in the National Football League. The Bears started the season fast, winning their first five games, three of them on the road. After a tie to the Giants and a loss to the Packers, the Bears finished the season strong, winning their last four games. The club was second in scoring offense, behind Green Bay, and led the league in scoring defense.

1938 Chicago Bears season

The 1938 Chicago Bears season was their 19th regular season completed in the National Football League. They finished third in the Western Division and did not make the championship game. The Bears started the season well, winning 4 of their first 5 games. However, two upset losses to the Cleveland Rams, two losses to the Detroit Lions, and a loss to Green Bay prevented the Bears from competing in the West.

1939 Chicago Bears season

The 1939 Chicago Bears season was their 20th regular season completed in the National Football League. They finished second in the Western Division with an 8–3 record. The Bears started the season well, winning 4 of their first 5 games. However, two mid-season losses to New York and Detroit cost them the Division to Green Bay. The Packers went on to win the NFL championship.

1946 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team

The 1946 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team was the representative of the University of Nebraska and member of the Big 6 Conference in the 1946 college football season. The team was coached by Bernie Masterson and played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Nebraska.

1947 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team

The 1947 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team was the representative of the University of Nebraska and member of the Big 6 Conference in the 1947 college football season. The team was coached by Bernie Masterson and played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Al Grygo

Aloysius Joseph Grygo (August 14, 1918 – September 27, 1971) was an American football running back and quarterback in the National Football League. He played for the Chicago Bears. He played college football for the South Carolina Gamecocks.

Bob Williams (quarterback)

Robert Allen Williams (January 2, 1930 – May 26, 2016) was an American football quarterback in the National Football League (NFL).

Dick Flanagan

Richard E. Flanagan (October 31, 1927 in Sidney, Ohio – September 27, 1997) was a National Football League center who played eight seasons. He also played RB in college and his first year with the Bears, LB until his last 2 years in the game, and OG also.

Joey Sternaman

Joseph Theodore Sternaman (February 1, 1900 – March 10, 1988) was a professional American football player, born in Springfield, Illinois, who played quarterback for nine seasons for the Chicago Bears and Duluth Kelleys. At 5'6" and 135 pounds he was called "the strongest little man I ever met" by sportswriter Grantland Rice. He played quarterback during the years Red Grange starred with the Bears. In 1926, he was the quarterback, head coach, and owner of the Chicago Bulls of the first American Football League. Joey was also the brother of Chicago Bears co-owner Dutch Sternaman.

Les Witte

Leslie Witte (April 2, 1911 – December 23, 1973), nicknamed "Beanie" and "One Grand Witte", was a two-time consensus All-American basketball player for the Wyoming Cowboys in 1932 and 1934. A forward, he was the first All-American in University of Wyoming history and was also the first Wyoming player to score 1,000 career points, finishing with 1,069, which was the inspiration for his "One Grand Witte" nickname.

A native of Lincoln, Nebraska, Witte played football and basketball at Lincoln High School from 1927–28 to 1929–30. In football, he helped his teammate (and future National Football League player) Bernie Masterson lead the 'Links' to a 23–0–2 record, while in basketball he also guided the team to a 40–10 record between 1929 and 1930. In his senior season of 1929–30 the basketball team won the state championship.

Les Witte was the younger brother of Cowboys head coach Willard "Dutch" Witte who coached Les for his entire career, including the national championship-winning team his senior season when Wyoming finished with a 26–4 record. In the pre-NCAA Tournament days, the Helms Foundation voted to determine the national champions. Being the only college basketball voting poll of the era, Helms had the authority on issues such as All-America selections and national champions.

The Spalding Guide, an early sports magazine that focused primarily on baseball but dabbled in other sports, once wrote about Witte in a 1932 issue,

"Witte was the cleverest player to show in the conference in a long time. This boy's dribbling, pivoting and feinting, and his lefthand arch shots, could not be stopped."

Despite great college success, Witte never played professionally because there were no viable professional leagues during that time. The Basketball Association of America (BAA) would not even exist until 1946, well after Witte's prime.

List of Chicago Bears starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Bears.

Noah Mullins

Noah Walker Mullins (May 23, 1918 – October 31, 1998) was an American football running back, quarterback and defensive back in the National Football League. He played for the Chicago Bears and New York Giants. He played college football for the Kentucky Wildcats.

Pard Pearce

Walter Irving "Pard" Pearce (October 23, 1896 – May 24, 1974) was a professional American football player who played quarterback for six seasons for the Decatur Staleys, the Chicago Staleys, the Chicago Bears, the Kenosha Maroons, and the Providence Steam Roller. Pearce was the first starting quarterback for the Bears in team history.

Ray Buivid

Raymond Vincent Buivid (August 15, 1915 – July 5, 1972) was an American football player who played quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) for the Chicago Bears.

A versatile player, Buivid played quarterback, halfback, and defensive back for the Marquette Golden Avalanche football team. He threw 13 touchdowns his junior year (1935). In 1936, he finished third in the voting for the Heisman Trophy and was a consensus All-American as a halfback, though he completed over 50% of his passes as quarterback as well. Marquette finished 20th in the country, and played in their first ever bowl game, the first Cotton Bowl Classic. They lost 16–6 to TCU led by Sammy Baugh.

Buivid signed with the Chicago Bears on October 11, 1937 after missing the first three games of the season. In the season finale against the cross-town rival Chicago Cardinals, he became the first player to throw five touchdowns in a single game, and also caught one. Despite this performance, he appeared in just six games that season, all behind starting quarterback Bernie Masterson, attempting just 35 passes. The 9–1 Bears won the Western division, and played in the 1937 NFL Championship Game against the Washington Redskins, led by fellow rookie Sammy Baugh (who was drafted after Buivid, despite defeating him in the Cotton Bowl). Buivid was just 3 for 12 passing and 3 for -6 yards rushing with three turnovers, including a muffed punt late in the fourth quarter to seal the defeat.The next season, he appeared in 11 games but attempted just 48 passes for 295 yards, along with 32 rushes for 65 yards. He retired after just two seasons at age 23 to serve in World War II as a lieutenant in the navy.

Steve Bradley (American football)

Steven Carl Bradley (born July 16, 1963) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League. He played for the Chicago Bears. He played college football for the Indiana Hoosiers.

Tom Farris

Thomas George Farris (September 16, 1920 – November 16, 2002) was an American football quarterback who played for the Chicago Bears (1946–1947) in National Football League the Chicago Rockets (1948) in the All-America Football Conference.

After playing college football at the University of Wisconsin, Farris was an 11th round selection (99th overall pick) of the 1942 NFL Draft by the Green Bay Packers. But before training camp, he enlisted in the United States Coast Guard to serve in World War II. He played 33 regular season games over 3 seasons. In 1946, which was his best season, he had 1 passing touchdown, 2 pass interceptions, 1 reception and 16 receiving yards.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.