Bernardo Harris

Bernardo Harris (born October 15, 1971) is a former American football linebacker in the National Football League. He attended Chapel Hill High School, graduating in 1990. He was recruited by Mack Brown to play at the University of North Carolina and graduated in 1994. After not being drafted, he was signed as a free agent by the Kansas City Chiefs in 1994. At Kansas City, Harris injured his knee in the first week of training camp and was out of football.[1]

Bernardo Harris became a free agent and was signed by the Green Bay Packers in 1995, playing in eleven games his rookie season. Harris played for the Green Bay Packers for seven seasons [2] and played on the 1996 Super Bowl XXXI and 1997 Super Bowl XXXII teams.

In 2002, Harris was signed as a free agent by the Baltimore Ravens, after a shoulder injury to Ray Lewis. In 2003, Bernardo Harris was placed on the injured reserved and subsequently retired.

Bernardo Harris
No. 55
Position:Linebacker
Personal information
Born:October 15, 1971 (age 47)
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Career information
College:North Carolina
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Tackles:628
Sacks:9.5
Interceptions:5
Player stats at NFL.com

Significant Contributions To the NFL

While Bernardo Harris was playing for the Green Bay Packers in the January 3, 1999 playoff game against the San Francisco 49ers, Harris caused a controversial fumble which would largely be recognized as the precursor to video replay in the NFL.

Towards the end of the 1999 playoff game, a pass was caught by Hall of Fame wide-receiver Jerry Rice, following the catch, Bernardo Harris stripped Jerry Rice of the ball, and was recovered by the Green Bay Packers. The game appeared to be won by the Green Bay Packers. However, the call on the field was that Rice was down by contact and San Francisco retained possession. Video replay showed that Rice has fumbled the ball, however, at that time replay was not used in the NFL. The 49ers went on to defeat the Green Bay Packers on that drive, by a final score of 30-27. Due to the controversial Harris call, the NFL announced the following season that it would begin instituting video replay.

References

  1. ^ Hendricks, Martin (2007-11-29). "Taking nothing for granted". Jsonline.com. Archived from the original on 2012-06-25. Retrieved 2014-04-17.
  2. ^ "Bernardo Harris NFL Football Statistics". Pro-Football-Reference.com. 1971-10-15. Retrieved 2014-04-17.
1995 Green Bay Packers season

The 1995 Green Bay Packers season was their 77th season overall and their 75th in the National Football League. The Packers obtained an 11–5 mark in the regular season and won the NFC Central, their first division title since 1972. In the playoffs, the Packers defeated the Atlanta Falcons at home and the defending champion San Francisco 49ers on the road before losing to the Dallas Cowboys in the NFC Championship Game. Packers' quarterback Brett Favre was named the NFL's Most Valuable Player, the first of three such awards he would win.

This was the first season that the Packers played home games exclusively at Lambeau Field, after playing part of their home slate at Milwaukee County Stadium since 1953. After losing their home opener to St. Louis, the Packers would win an NFL-record 25 consecutive home games between the rest of 1995 and early in 1998.

1995 NFL Draft

The 1995 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 22–23, 1995 at the Paramount Theatre at Madison Square Garden in New York City, New York. At the time of the draft, the Raiders were still based in Los Angeles. They would officially return to Oakland after a 13-year hiatus in July 1995. Additionally, the former Los Angeles Rams had gotten approval to move to St. Louis shortly before the draft on April 13 (they would return to Los Angeles in 2016). The league also held a supplemental draft after the regular draft and before the regular season.

There were 32 picks in the first round of this draft as the two expansion teams each received two extra picks between the first and second rounds. The Carolina Panthers, having selected second in the 1995 NFL Expansion Draft, were awarded the first overall pick in this draft and the Jacksonville Jaguars, having picked first in the expansion draft, selected second. The Panthers, however, traded their number one pick to the Cincinnati Bengals for the Bengals' fifth overall pick and their fourth pick in the second round. The Panthers were also stripped of two later supplemental picks, numbers 61 and 191, for improperly recruiting the Pittsburgh Steelers Defensive Coordinator, Dom Capers, as their Head Coach.This marked only the third time to date in NFL History that two Hall of Fame players were selected by the same team in the same round (the other being the Bears in 1965 draft and the Ravens in the 1996 NFL Draft.) The Tampa Bay Buccaneers selected Warren Sapp with the 12th overall pick and Derrick Brooks with the 28th overall pick. The two future Hall of Famers would go on to lead a strong defense which contributed heavily to the win in Super Bowl XXXVII.

1995–96 NFL playoffs

The National Football League playoffs for the 1995 season began on December 30, 1995. The postseason tournament concluded with the Dallas Cowboys defeating the Pittsburgh Steelers in Super Bowl XXX, 27–17, on January 28, 1996, at Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe, Arizona.

1996 Green Bay Packers season

The 1996 Green Bay Packers season was their 78th season overall and their 76th in the National Football League, which culminated with the franchise winning its third Super Bowl and league-record 12th NFL Championship. The Packers posted a league-best 13–3 regular season won-loss record, going 8–0 at home and 5–3 on the road. It was the first time since 1962 that the club went undefeated at home. Additionally, the Packers had the NFL's highest-scoring offense (456) and allowed the fewest points on defense (210). Green Bay was the first team to accomplish both feats in the same season since the undefeated 1972 Miami Dolphins. They finished the season with the number one ranked offense, defense, and special teams. They also set a then NFL record for the fewest touchdowns allowed in a 16-game season, with 19. The Packers also allowed the fewest yards in the NFL and set a record for punt return yardage. Brett Favre won his second straight MVP award while also throwing for a career-high and league leading 39 touchdown passes.

In the postseason, the Packers defeated the San Francisco 49ers in the divisional round and the Carolina Panthers in the NFC Championship Game. Green Bay beat the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XXXI to win their third Super Bowl and twelfth NFL Championship.In 2007, the 1996 Packers were ranked as the 16th greatest Super Bowl champions on the NFL Network's documentary series America's Game: The Super Bowl Champions. The 1996 Packers were ranked 6th-greatest Super Bowl team of all-time by a similar panel done by ESPN and released in 2007. As of 2019, the Packers are the only team since the implementation of the salary cap to score the most points and allow the fewest in the regular season.

1997 Green Bay Packers season

The 1997 Green Bay Packers season was their 79th season overall and their 77th in the National Football League. The season concluded with the team winning its second consecutive NFC championship, but losing in a 31–24 upset to John Elway's Denver Broncos in Super Bowl XXXII. The team narrowly missed its opportunity to post back-to-back Super Bowl wins.

After a dominating 1996 campaign which ended with a victory in Super Bowl XXXI, many expected the Packers to repeat as champions in 1997. During training camp, star safety LeRoy Butler, among others, said that the Packers had the chance to run the table and go 19–0. This opinion drew increased coverage from the media as the Packers notched impressive victories in all five preseason games. The undefeated hype ended quickly, however, when Green Bay lost week 2 in Philadelphia.

Following a relatively slow 3–2 start, the Packers caught fire in the second half of the season, finishing with a 13–3 regular season record and 8–0 home record for the second consecutive year. In the playoffs, Green Bay defeated the Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Lambeau Field in the divisional round, and San Francisco 49ers at 3Com Park in the NFC Championship. Some in the media dubbed the NFC title game as "the real Super Bowl" because of the 49ers' and Packers' league dominance, and the relative inferiority of the AFC in recent Super Bowls. Green Bay's win marked the third consecutive year the team had defeated San Francisco in the playoffs.

The Packers entered Super Bowl XXXII as 11 1/2-point favorites. The point spread was likely determined by Green Bay's victory in the previous Super Bowl, the AFC's string of 13 consecutive Super Bowl losses, and Denver's losses in four previous Super Bowls. The game itself was a seesaw battle, and one of the most exciting Super Bowls in history. The Broncos won the thriller 31–24, earning John Elway his first Super Bowl victory at the age of 37, and the first championship in franchise history. Years later, Brett Favre said the Broncos were far underrated, and credited Denver's innovative blitz packages and strategies, foreign to the league at that time, for confusing the Packers.

Packers' quarterback Brett Favre was named the league's MVP for the third year in a row in 1997. Favre was the first player in the history of the award to win three MVPs, and remains the only player to have won three MVPs consecutively. The Packers became the first team to have six NFL MVP award winners.The 1997 Packers are one of only two teams in NFL history to win seven games against teams that would go on to make the playoffs.

1998 Green Bay Packers season

The 1998 Green Bay Packers season was their 80th season overall and their 78th in the National Football League. It ended with a 30–27 loss in the NFC Wild Card Game to the San Francisco 49ers, with Steve Young throwing a 25-yard touchdown pass to Terrell Owens with three seconds left. The season marked the end of an era in many ways for Green Bay; this was the last season for which both head coach Mike Holmgren and Hall of Fame defensive end Reggie White would find themselves on the Packers' sideline. This was the first time the Packers had not won the division in four years. In addition, the Minnesota Vikings brought an end to the Packers 25 game home winning streak in Week 5.

1998 was the final season that the Packers would qualify for the postseason during the 1990s. They would not return to the playoffs until 2001.

1999 Green Bay Packers season

The 1999 Green Bay Packers season was their 81st season overall and their 79th in the National Football League. It was the first and only season for head coach Ray Rhodes. The Packers finished 8–8, posting their worst record since Brett Favre took over the helm as the Packers' starting quarterback.

2000 Green Bay Packers season

The 2000 Green Bay Packers season was their 82nd season overall and their 80th in the National Football League. It was the first season for which Mike Sherman was the head coach of the team. Sherman was the thirteenth head coach in franchise history. The Packers finished 9–7, failing to qualify for the playoffs. The Packers total offense ranked 15th in the league, and their total defense ranked 15th in the league.

2001 Green Bay Packers season

The 2001 Green Bay Packers season was their 83rd season overall and their 81st season in the National Football League.

The Packers returned to the postseason after two years of missing the playoffs if the 1999 and 2000 seasons.

They finished with a 12–4 record. After easily defeating the San Francisco 49ers in the wild card round, Green Bay's season ended with a loss to the 14–2 St. Louis Rams in the NFC divisional playoff game, in which quarterback Brett Favre threw a career high six interceptions.

2002 Baltimore Ravens season

The 2002 Baltimore Ravens season was the team's seventh season in the National Football League (NFL). They were unable to improve upon their previous output of 10–6, instead winning only seven games and missing the playoffs for the first time in three years.

Baltimore’s defense took a significant step back from its normally high level of play in 2002. Star linebacker Ray Lewis suffered a shoulder injury which limited him to playing in only five games during the season, and the team finished 19th in scoring defense after finishing 4th in the NFL the previous year.

2002 Green Bay Packers season

The 2002 Green Bay Packers season was their 84th season overall and their 82nd in the National Football League.

The Packers achieved a 12–4 record in the regular season, before losing in the 2003 NFL Wild Card playoffs round to Michael Vick's Atlanta Falcons at Lambeau Field. This marked the first time in NFL history that the Packers had lost at home in the playoffs.

2007 Green Bay Packers season

The 2007 Green Bay Packers season was the franchise's 89th overall and 87th season in the National Football League. The Packers finished the regular season with an impressive 13–3 record. They received a bye for the first round of the playoffs, won their divisional round playoff game, and lost in the NFC Championship game to the eventual Super Bowl champion New York Giants. This was the last season for quarterback Brett Favre as a Green Bay Packer.

This season also marked the 50th anniversary of the opening of the Packers' home stadium of Lambeau Field. The Packers' tenure at Lambeau, now at 59 seasons, is the longest in NFL history at a single stadium, breaking the Chicago Bears' previous record of 50 seasons at Wrigley Field (1921–1970).

2007 Rhein Fire season

The 2007 Rhein Fire season was the 13th and final season for the franchise in the NFL Europa League (NFLEL). The team was led by head coach Rick Lantz in his first year, and played its home games at LTU arena in Düsseldorf, Germany. They finished the season in fourth place with a record of four wins and six losses. The National Football League (NFL) announced the closure of its European branch on June 29, ending the team's 13-year existence.

2009 Green Bay Packers season

The 2009 Green Bay Packers season was the 91st season over all and their 89th in the National Football League. The Packers finished with an 11–5 record but lost in the wild card round of the playoffs to the Arizona Cardinals. They scored a franchise record 461 points (currently the third best behind the 2011 and 2014 teams) besting the 1996 Super Bowl team's 456. Charles Woodson was named Defensive Player of the Year for the season, leading the league with 9 interceptions. The defense ranked 2nd overall in the league (1st against the run; 2nd against the pass).

Chapel Hill High School (Chapel Hill, North Carolina)

Chapel Hill High School is a public high school in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. It is located close to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Chapel Hill High School is part of the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools district which contains two other high schools, Carrboro High School and East Chapel Hill High School. Chapel Hill High School was listed as one of the top-performing U.S. high schools in The Wall Street Journal (October 15, 1999), for "the best student performance over the past 10 years based on SAT, achievement-test and standardized-test scores."

North Carolina Tar Heels football

The North Carolina Tar Heels football team represents the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the sport of American football. The Tar Heels have played in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Coastal Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). Being the oldest public university and oldest collegiate team in the Carolinas, the school is nicknamed "Carolina" in athletics. The program's title in football is "Carolina Football".

North Carolina has played in 31 bowl games in its history and won three Southern Conference championships and five Atlantic Coast Conference titles. Thirty Tar Heel players have been honored as first-team All-Americas on 38 occasions. Carolina had 32 All-Southern Conference selections when it played in that league until 1952 and since joining the ACC in 1953, has had 174 first-team All-ACC choices. Since joining the Atlantic Coast Conference in 1953, the team has won five conference championships, with the most recent title coming in 1980.

One very important contribution to the game of football by Carolina is the modern use of the forward pass; they were the first college team to use the play in 1895. Bob Quincy notes in his 1973 book They Made the Bell Tower Chime:

"John Heisman, a noted historian, wrote 30 years later that, indeed, the Tar Heels had given birth to the forward pass against the Bulldogs (UGA). It was conceived to break a scoreless deadlock and give UNC a 6–0 win. The Tar Heels were in a punting situation and a Georgia rush seemed destined to block the ball. The punter, with an impromptu dash to his right, tossed the ball and it was caught by George Stephens, who ran 70 yards for a touchdown."

The program has long been overshadowed by the school's powerhouse men's basketball team. While not a consistent football powerhouse, the Carolina football program has had intermittent success and has featured a number of great players, many of whom have gone on to prominence in the National Football League, including Lawrence Taylor, Charlie Justice, Chris Hanburger, Ken Willard, Don McCauley, William Fuller, Harris Barton, Jeff Saturday, Alge Crumpler, Willie Parker, Greg Ellis, Dré Bly, Julius Peppers and Hakeem Nicks.

Rhein Fire

The Rhein Fire was a professional American football team in NFL Europe, formerly the World League of American Football. Established in Germany in 1995, the franchise resurrected the name of the former Birmingham Fire team which was active during the 1991–1992 WLAF seasons.

Super Bowl XXXII

Super Bowl XXXII was an American football game played between the National Football Conference (NFC) champion and defending Super Bowl XXXI champion Green Bay Packers and the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Denver Broncos to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1997 season. The Broncos defeated the Packers by the score of 31–24. The game was played on January 25, 1998 at Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego, California, the second time that the Super Bowl was held in that city. Super Bowl XXXII also made Qualcomm Stadium the only stadium in history to have the Super Bowl and the World Series in the same year.

This was Denver's first league championship after suffering four previous Super Bowl losses, and snapped a 13-game losing streak for AFC teams in the Super Bowl (the previous being the Los Angeles Raiders' win in Super Bowl XVIII after the 1983 season). The Broncos, who entered the game after posting a 12–4 regular season record in 1997, became just the second wild card team to win a Super Bowl and the first since the Raiders in Super Bowl XV. The Packers, who entered the game as the defending Super Bowl XXXI champions after posting a 13–3 regular season record, were the first team favored to win by double digits to lose a Super Bowl since Super Bowl IV.

The game was close throughout much of the contest. The Broncos converted two turnovers to take a 17–7 lead in the second quarter before the Packers cut the score to 17–14 at halftime. Green Bay kept pace with Denver in the second half, before tying the game with 13:32 remaining. Both defenses stiffened until Broncos running back Terrell Davis scored the go-ahead touchdown with 1:45 left. Despite suffering a migraine headache that caused him to miss most of the second quarter, Davis (a San Diego native) was named Super Bowl MVP. He ran for 157 yards, caught two passes for 8 yards, and scored a Super Bowl record three rushing touchdowns.

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