Berlinetta

The term Berlinetta (from Italian: berlinetta; Italian pronunciation: [berliˈnetta]) refers to a sports coupé, typically with two seats but also including 2+2 cars.[1]

The original meaning for berlinetta in Italian is “little saloon”.[2]

Introduced in the 1930s, the term was popularized by Ferrari in the 1950s. Maserati, Opel, Alfa Romeo, and other European car manufacturers have also used the Berlinetta label.

In North America, Chevrolet also produced a version of the Camaro called the Berlinetta, from 1979 to 1986.[3] The Berlinetta model was marketed as having a luxury focus, through interior features and softer suspension.[4][5]

Berlinette

Berlinette is the French name for a Berlinetta, which is defined as a sporty, low-profile two-door type of automobile body style closely related to the coupé.[6]

After World War II, the term came to refer to a small vehicle with enclosed coachwork similar to a two-door berline, or sedan in France. It supplanted use of the term "coach" for a similar but older body style, which had replaced the even older term "demi-berline".[7]

The most common recent usage was in reference to the Alpine A110 sports car, which was often simply called "la Berlinette".[8]

References

  1. ^ "Porsche 960 : une nouvelle berlinette à moteur flat-8". www.autonews.fr.
  2. ^ Laban, Brian. The Ultimate History of Ferrari. Bath: Parragon, 2002. ISBN 978-0-7525-8873-5.
  3. ^ "Chevrolet Camaro Berlinetta". www.caranddriver.com. Retrieved 5 April 2018.
  4. ^ "Camaro Berlinetta - The Digital Camaro". www.berlinetta.info. Retrieved 5 April 2018.
  5. ^ "Bizarre Car of the Week: 1982 Chevrolet Camaro Berlinetta". www.nydailynews.com. Retrieved 5 April 2018.
  6. ^ "Berlinette". www.larousse.fr.
  7. ^ Haajanen, Lennart W. Illustrated Dictionary of Automobile Body Styles. McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, Jefferson, North Carolina, and London. ISBN 978-0-7864-3737-5.
  8. ^ "Vive la Berlinette". www.cnet.com.
Bandini 1000 turbo

The Bandini 1000 turbo, also known as Bandini Berlinetta is a hand-built road car, built in 1992 by Ilario Bandini.

The engineer Ilario Bandini called this car "my pride". The berlinetta was the latest creation born from his hands and represents the ultimate evolutionary step of his long career of "inventor of the car" as it was defined by the Italian magazine Autosprint in 1981.

The design and construction of berlinetta undertook the last six years of life Ilario Bandini that despite the eighty candles, as proof, once again, its continued commitment to improving technical and stylistic their "inventions". The "berlinetta" will last witness of his creative genius, its technical capabilities and skills craft.

Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera

Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera is an Italian automobile coachbuilder. Originally established in Milan in 1925, Carrozzeria Touring became well known for both the beauty of its designs and patented superleggera construction methods. The business folded in 1966. In 2006 its brands and trademarks were purchased and a new firm established nearby to provide automotive design, engineering, coachbuilding, homologation services, non-automotive industrial design, and restoration of historic vehicles.

Carrozzeria Touring was established on 25 March 1926 by Felice Bianchi Anderloni (1882–1948) and Gaetano Ponzoni. After achieving success through the middle of the 20th century, the business began to decline as automobile manufacturers replaced body-on-frame automobile construction with monocoque design and increasingly took coachbuilding in-house.

After the original firm ceased production in 1966, Carlo Felice Bianchi Anderloni and Carrozzeria Marazzi preserved the "Touring Superleggera" trademark and used it on several occasions to support the company's heritage. The trademark was acquired by the current owner, a family business, which began conducting its activities in 2006 under the name Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera S.r.l.; the new firm is headquartered nearby Milan, its hometown.

Concorso d'Eleganza Villa d'Este

Concorso d'Eleganza Villa d'Este (Italian for "Competition of Elegance of Villa d'Este") is a Concours d'Elegance event for classic and vintage cars. It has taken place every year since 1929 during the last weekend of May near the Villa d'Este hotel in Cernobbio, on the shores of Lake Como in Italy. Since 2011, the event takes place in the second half of May.

BMW Group has organised the event, jointly with the Villa d'Este hotel, for the last ten years. Visitors can admire about fifty cars, all built between the 1920s and the 1970s, organized in different categories.

Car makers also take advantage of the event to showcase some of their upcoming models. For example, a working Aston Martin One-77 was officially unveiled to the press during the event.

Coupé

A coupé or coupe is a passenger car with a sloping rear roofline and generally two doors (although several four-door cars have also been marketed as coupés).

Coupé was first applied to horse-drawn carriages for two passengers without rear-facing seats. The term coupé comes from the French translation of "cut".

Ferrari 166 MM Berlinetta Le Mans

See also the 166 S/MM

The Ferrari 166 MM Berlinetta Le Mans was a car built by Ferrari in 1950. Only 6 were produced. It was designed primarily for racing, and was an improvement of earlier models of the Ferrari 166, such as the 166 Barchetta. This "Berlinetta" design was a little heavier than previous models, but was supposed to perform better in high-speed races such as the Le Mans races. The two cars that were entered in 1950 for the Le Mans did not finish.

Ferrari 166 S

See also the 166 Inter GT car

See also the 166 MM Berlinetta Le Mans

See also the Ferrari-Abarth 166 MM/53The Ferrari 166 S was an evolution of Ferrari's 125 S sports race car that became a sports car for the street in the form of the 166 Inter. Only 12 Ferrari 166 S were produced, nine of them with cycle-fenders as Spyder Corsa, soon followed by the production of the Ferrari 166 MM (Mille Miglia) which was made in much larger numbers (47) from 1948 to 1953. The 166 MM was an updated 166 S and went on to score many of Ferrari’s early international victories, making the manufacturer a serious competitor in the racing industry. Both were later replaced by the 2.3 L 195 S.

Ferrari 195 S

See also the 195 Inter grand tourerThe 195 S was a racing sports car produced by Ferrari in 1950. Introduced at the Giro di Sicilia on April 2, 1950, it was similar to the 166 MM also run at that race. The two cars, one open and one closed coupé, shared that car's 2,250 mm (89 in) wheelbase but sported an enlarged 2.3 L (2341 cc/142 in³) version of the Colombo V12. These two initial cars were forced to retire, but three came to the Mille Miglia of that year, with the event won by the 195 S Touring berlinetta of Giannino Marzotto with Serafini's Touring barchetta in second place.

Ferrari 212 Export

The Ferrari 212 Export was a sports racing car produced by Ferrari in 1951 to replace the 195 S. It had a shorter wheelbase than the Ferrari 212 Inter grand tourer.

The Colombo 2,562 cc (156.3 cu in) V12 used in the Export had an 8.4:1 compression ratio, up from the 7.5:1 ratio used in the Inter. Exports were fitted with three Weber setup yielding 165 PS (121 kW) at 7,000 rpm and a top speed of 220 km/h (137 mph).Twenty-seven 212 Export models were built, most of them used in competition.In 1951, 212 Exports took the first three places in the Tour de France automobile racing event and won the Giro di Sicilia and the Giro di Toscana motor races. Carrozzeria Motto-bodied Export took third place in 1951 Mille Miglia. Same year Cornacchia and Bracco scored second place in Targa Florio

Ferrari 250

The Ferrari 250 is a series of sports cars and grand tourers built by Ferrari from 1953 to 1964. The company's most successful early line, the 250 series includes many variants designed for road use or sports car racing. 250 series cars are characterized by their use of a 3.0 litres (2,953 cc) Colombo V12 engine designed by Giaoccino Colombo. They were replaced by the 275 and 330 series cars.

Ferrari 250 GT Lusso

The Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Lusso is a GT car which was manufactured by Italian automaker Ferrari from 1963 to 1964. Sometimes known as the GTL, GT/L or just Lusso, it is larger and more luxurious than the 250 GT Berlinetta. The 250 GT Lusso, which was not intended to compete in sports car racing, is considered to be one of the most elegant Ferraris.Keeping in line with the Ferrari "tradition" of that time, the 250 GT Lusso was designed by the Turinese coachbuilder Pininfarina, and bodied by Carrozzeria Scaglietti. Although the interior was more spacious than that of the 250 GT, the 250 GT Lusso remained a two-seat GT coupe, unlike the 250 GTE. The car was manufactured for only eighteen months, from early 1963 to mid 1964, and was the last model of Ferrari 250 GT generation.

Auto shows often provide an opportunity for manufacturers to introduce new designs publicly. Ferrari did so at the 1962 Paris Motor Show to unveil, as a prototype, the 250 GT Lusso. The prototype was almost identical to the production version, and only minor details changed thereafter.The new model was a way for Ferrari to fill a void left between the sporty 250 GT SWB and the luxurious 250 GTE 2+2, the Lusso met the new demands of the 1960s. Indeed, fans of sporting driving of the time became as fond of civilized designs, that is, comfortable and spacious, as they were of radical sports cars. Ferrari did not skimp on details in the GTL, which shows on the scales; weight ranged from 1,020 to 1,310 kg (2,250 to 2,890 lb), depending on equipment.Unusually brief for a Ferrari model, GTL's production began January 1963 and ended August 1964. According to a longstanding American expert on Ferrari, Peter Coltrin, the construction of the 250 GT Lusso must have begun soon after the presentation of the prototype of the Paris Motor Show.Although it was not intended to compete, the 250 GT Lusso made a few appearances in several sporting events in 1964 and 1965, such as the Targa Florio and the Tour de France. The final iteration of the 250 GT series, 351 copies of GT Lusso were produced before being replaced by the Ferrari 275 GTB. (Note nomenclature change due to increase in engine cylinder capacity.) Originally sold for $13,375, the GTL saw sales in 2010 between $400,000 and $500,000, and in 2013 values approached 4 times this figure.

Ferrari 330

The Ferrari 330 was a series of V12 powered automobiles produced by Ferrari in 2+2 GT Coupé, two-seat Berlinetta, spyder, and race car versions between 1963 and 1968.

The first, the 2+2 330 America, was a 250 GT/E with a larger 3.3 litre engine; the 330 GTC/GTS shared its chassis with the 275; the 330 GT 2+2 had its own chassis and bodywork; the mid-engined 330P racer was part of the Ferrari P series, produced in four models. Production ended in 1968 with the introduction of the Ferrari 365 series.

All 330 models used an evolution of the 400 Superamerica's 4.0 L Colombo V12 engine. It was substantially changed, with wider bore spacing and an alternator replacing a generator.

Ferrari 375 MM

See Ferrari 375 F1 for the 375 used in Formula 1 racing, and 375 America, a GT carFerrari 375 MM, was a race car produced by Ferrari in 1953 and 1954. It was named "375" for the per-cylinder displacement in the 4.5 L V12 engine, and the "MM" stood for the Mille Miglia race. The engine was based on its Ferrari 375 F1 counterpart, but with shorter stroke and bigger bore. The first prototype was a Vignale Spyder and three next cars were Pinin Farina Berlinettas, all converted from Ferrari 340 MM. Perhaps the most known 375 MM is the "Ingrid Bergman" version, commissioned in 1954 by director Roberto Rossellini for his wife, actress Ingrid Bergman. The Bergman 375 MM was subsequently bought and restored by the Microsoft executive Jon Shirley and the restoration specialist Butch Dennison. It later became the first postwar Ferrari to win Best of Show at the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance. Although intended for Mille Miglia, 375 MM was also raced with limited success in Carrera Panamericana, scoring fourth place in 1953 and finishing second in 1954. In total 26 units were made, including four converted from 340 MM.

Ferrari Berlinetta Boxer

The Ferrari Berlinetta Boxer (BB) is an automobile that was produced by Ferrari in Italy between 1973 and 1984. Replacing the front engined Daytona, it was the first in a series of Ferraris to use a mid-mounted flat-12 engine. The Boxer was designed by Leonardo Fioravanti and was the first mid-engined road-car to bear the Ferrari name and the Cavallino Rampante (prancing horse) logo. It was replaced by the Testarossa, which continued to use the Flat-12 engine.

The BB was not officially imported into the United States by the Ferrari company, as Enzo Ferrari believed that emerging environmental and safety regulations and a 55 MPH national speed limit suggested the company's 8 cylinder cars would suffice in the US market. Instead, dealers in the United States contracted with independent third parties that made the necessary EPA and US DOT modifications such as the installation of catalytic converters, and many of them are now in the United States.

Ferrari Daytona

The Ferrari Daytona, officially designated the Ferrari 365 GTB/4, is a two-seat grand tourer produced by Ferrari from 1968 to 1973. It was introduced at the Paris Auto Salon in 1968 to replace the 275 GTB/4, and featured the 275's Colombo V12 bored out to 4,390 cc (4.4 L; 267.9 cu in).

The Daytona was succeeded by the mid-engined 365 GT4 Berlinetta Boxer in 1973.

Ferrari F12

The Ferrari F12berlinetta (also unofficially referred to as the F12 Berlinetta or the F12, and unofficially stylized as the F12B for short)(Type F152) is a front mid-engine, rear-wheel-drive grand tourer produced by Italian automobile manufacturer Ferrari. The F12berlinetta debuted at the 2012 Geneva Motor Show, and replaces the 599 grand tourer. The naturally aspirated 6.3 litre Ferrari V12 engine used in the F12berlinetta has won the 2013 International Engine of the Year Award in the Best Performance category and Best Engine above 4.0 litres. The F12berlinetta was named "The Supercar of the Year 2012" by car magazine Top Gear. The F12berlinetta was replaced by the 812 Superfast in 2017.

In 2014, the F12berlinetta was awarded the XXIII Premio Compasso d'oro ADI. Accepting the award was Ferrari’s Senior Vice President of Design, Flavio Manzoni.

Ferrari F355

The Ferrari F355 (Type F129) is a sports car manufactured by Italian car manufacturer Ferrari produced from May 1994 to 1999. The car is a heavily revised Ferrari 348 with notable exterior and performance changes. The F355 was succeeded by the all-new Ferrari 360.

Design emphasis for the F355 was placed on significantly improved performance, as well as drivability across a wider range of speeds and in different environments (such as low-speed city traffic.)

Ferrari P

The Ferrari P was a series of Italian sports prototype racing cars produced by Ferrari during the 1960s and early 1970s.

Although Enzo Ferrari resisted the move even with Cooper dominating F1, Ferrari began producing mid-engined racing cars in 1960 with the Ferrari Dino-V6-engine Formula Two 156, which would later be turned into the Formula One-winner of 1961.

Sports car racers followed in 1963. Although these cars shared their numerical designations (based on engine displacement) with road models, they were almost entirely dissimilar. The first Ferrari mid-engine in a road car did not arrive until the 1967 Dino, and it was 1971 before a Ferrari 12-cylinder engine was placed behind a road-going driver in the 365 GT4 BB.

Grand tourer

A grand tourer (GT) is a car that is designed for high speed and long-distance driving, due to a combination of performance and luxury attributes. The most common format is a front-engine, rear-wheel-drive two-door coupé with either a two-seat or a 2+2 arrangement.

The term derives from the Italian language phrase gran turismo which became popular in the English language from the 1950s, evolving from fast touring cars and streamlined closed sports cars during the 1930s.

Maserati A6

Maserati A6 were a series of grand tourers, racing sports cars and single seaters made by Maserati of Italy between 1947 and 1956. They were named for Alfieri Maserati (one of the Maserati brothers, founders of Maserati) and for their straight-six engine.The 1.5-litre straight-six was named A6 TR (Testa Riportata for its detachable cylinder head), and was based on the pre-war Maserati 6CM; 65 bhp (48 kW). It first appeared in the A6 Sport or Tipo 6CS/46, a barchetta prototype, developed by Ernesto Maserati and Alberto Massimino. This became the A6 1500 Pinin Farina-designed two-door berlinetta, first shown at the 1947 Salon International de l'Auto in Geneva (59 made) and the spider shown at the 1948 Salone dell'automobile di Torino (2 made).

A 2-litre straight-six (120 bhp) was used in the A6 GCS two-seater, «G» denoting Ghisa, cast iron block, and «CS» denoting Corsa & Sports. Also called monofaro, the 580 kg single-seater and cycle-winged racing version first appeared at Modena 1947 by Luigi Villoresi and Alberto Ascari, and won the 1948 Italian Championship by Giovanni Bracco. Fifteen cars were made 1947-1953, of these being two-seaters (630 kg).

The A6G were a series of two-door coupe and spyders by Zagato, Pinin Farina, Pietro Frua, Ghia, Bertone, Carrozzeria Allemano and Vignale. These had alloy engine blocks.

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