Benito Santiago

Benito Santiago Rivera (born March 9, 1965), is a Puerto Rican former professional baseball catcher,[1] who played for twenty seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). Although he played for ten different teams, perhaps his greatest success came with his first team, the San Diego Padres.[1] In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Santiago was considered the premier catcher in the National League (NL).[2]

Benito Santiago
Billy Davis and Benito Santiago (cropped)
Santiago and Billy Davis in 2009
Catcher
Born: March 9, 1965 (age 54)
Ponce, Puerto Rico
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 14, 1986, for the San Diego Padres
Last MLB appearance
April 11, 2005, for the Pittsburgh Pirates
MLB statistics
Batting average.263
Home runs217
Runs batted in920
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Baseball career

Early years

Santiago was signed as an amateur free agent by the San Diego Padres on September 1, 1982.[1] After playing four seasons in the minor leagues, he made his Major League debut with the Padres on September 14, 1986 at the age of 21.[1] The next year, Santiago established a Major League record for a rookie by hitting safely in 34 straight games.[3] It was also the longest hitting streak by a catcher in major league history.[4] He ended the season with what would be career-highs in hits (164), doubles (33) and batting average (.300).[1] Santiago was the unanimous selection for the 1987 National League Rookie of the Year Award.[5] Although he struggled defensively, leading the league in errors and passed balls, his hitting performance earned him the 1987 Silver Slugger Award which is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position.[6][7]

While Santiago initially made an impression with his offensive statistics, he soon became known for his defensive prowess, most notably for his strong throwing arm.[8] Santiago was known for his ability to throw out would be base stealers from a kneeling position.[8] In 1988, he led National League catchers in assists and in baserunners caught stealing with a 45% average when the league average was 30%.[8][9] Although he still led the league's catchers with 12 errors, it was an improvement over the 22 he had committed the previous season. Santiago was awarded the first of three consecutive Gold Glove Awards in 1988.[10] Santiago also claimed his second successive Silver Slugger Award as the Padres improved to finish in third place in the National League Western Division.[11][12]

Although he was hitting for only a .236 average at mid-season in 1989, his defensive reputation earned him the starting catcher's role in the 1989 All-Star Game.[13][14] He was awarded the 1989 National League Gold Glove Award for catchers, as the Padres climbed to second place in the season's final standings.[15][16]

Santiago rebounded in 1990 and was hitting for a .317 batting average with 9 home runs in mid-June when he was hit by a pitch and had to miss six weeks of the season.[17] He finished the season with a .270 average along with 11 home runs and 53 runs batted in to earn his third Silver Slugger Award.[1][18] He was also named as a reserve player for the National League team in the 1990 All-Star Game and won his third consecutive Gold Glove Award.[19][20]

Before the 1991 season, Santiago asked for a four-year contract worth $11 million, but lost his arbitration case and was awarded a one-year contract worth $1.65 million.[21] A disgruntled Santiago announced that he would leave the Padres when he became eligible for free agency after the 1992 season.[21] He was also disillusioned when the Padres traded away players such as Joe Carter and Jack Clark.[22] In June, Padres manager, Greg Riddoch, benched Santiago for his lack of hustle on the playing field.[21] Despite the difficulties, Santiago led the league's catchers with 100 assists and posted a career-high 87 runs batted in.[1]

Santiago returned to arbitration before the 1992 season, this time winning a $3.3 million one-year contract that made him the highest paid catcher in professional baseball.[23] In September 1992, the Padres announced that they would not seek to re-sign Santiago, in what was seen as a cost-cutting measure.[22][24]

Santiago is also unusual for his uniform number; from 1991 to 1994, Santiago wore a jersey with the number 09, making him one of the only major professional sports players to have ever worn a jersey with a leading zero as part of his uniform number.[25]

Decline and trades

On December 16, 1992, Santiago signed with the newly established franchise Florida Marlins and hit the first home run in team history. Despite hitting for a .273 average in 1994, he was granted free agency after the season as the Marlins were ready to promote their young catching prospect, Charles Johnson.[1] On April 17, 1995, the Cincinnati Reds signed him and he briefly recovered his form batting .286.[1] On January 30, 1996, he joined the Phillies, where he became the first player to hit a grand slam off Greg Maddux in the regular season after Maddux had been pitching for nearly ten years.[26] Santiago also hit a home run in four consecutive at bats in the same season. Santiago ended the season with a career-high 30 home runs, along with 85 runs batted in, for the last place Phillies.[1]

Santiago then signed a contract to play for the Blue Jays (19971998) where he lost almost the entire 1998 season to a serious injury sustained in a car crash in Florida.[27] A free agent again, he played 89 games for the Cubs in 1999 and played for Cincinnati in 2000.[1]

Resurgence with the Giants

Santiago arrived in San Francisco on March 17, 2001. He played in 133 games and helped the Giants finish in second place, two games behind the Arizona Diamondbacks in the National League West.[1][28] He shared the 2001 Willie Mac Award with Mark Gardner, which recognized the spirit and leadership of each.[29] Santiago had another good year in 2002, appearing in 126 games and finishing third among National League catchers with a .995 fielding percentage.[1] He earned his fifth All-Star berth and ended the season with a .278 batting average with 74 runs batted in as the Giants once again finished second to the Diamondbacks and claimed the National League wild card berth.[1][30]

The Giants defeated the Atlanta Braves in the first round of the play-offs then met the St. Louis Cardinals in the 2002 National League Championship Series.[31] Santiago hit two home runs in the series along with 6 runs batted in, and was awarded the League Championship Series Most Valuable Player Award as the Giants defeated the Cardinals in five games.[32] In the 2002 World Series against the Anaheim Angels, Santiago delivered 5 runs batted in as the Giants were defeated in a seven-game series.[33][34]

In 2003, the 38-year-old Santiago continued to perform well, hitting fifth in the batting order behind Barry Bonds, he appeared in 108 games while posting a .279 batting average with 56 runs batted in.[1][35]

Later years

On December 11, 2003, Santiago, again a free agent, signed with the Kansas City Royals. By June 18, he was hitting .274 with six home runs and 23 RBI when he was hit by a pitch from Geoff Geary that broke his hand. After the 2004 season, the Royals traded him to the Pittsburgh Pirates for Leo Núñez, a minor league pitcher. The Pirates let Santiago go after a mere 23 at-bats in favor of giving playing time to young David Ross. Santiago signed with the New York Mets to a minor-league contract, but he appeared in only a handful of games. He opted out of his Triple-A contract, but did not play in the major leagues in 2006.

He was inducted into the San Diego Padres Hall of Fame on August 8, 2015.[36]

Career statistics

In a twenty-year major league career, Santiago played in 1,978 games, accumulating 1,830 hits in 6,951 at bats for a .261 career batting average along with 217 home runs, 920 runs batted in and an on-base percentage of .307.[1] He ended his career with a .987 fielding percentage.[1]

A five-time All-Star, Santiago was known for his strong defensive skills, leading National League catchers three times in assists, once in fielding percentage and once in baserunners caught stealing.[1] As 2010 began, Santiago was tied for eighth on the all-time list of games caught with Brad Ausmus, with 1,917.[37]

Steroid allegations

In 2003, Santiago was named by FBI investigators as one of the athletes alleged to have received anabolic steroids. He was linked to performance enhancers in the book Game of Shadows.[38]

On December 13, 2007, Santiago was named in the Mitchell Report. "At the end of the 2003 season, Mike Murphy, a Giants clubhouse attendant, was cleaning out Santiago's locker when he found a sealed package of syringes," the report read. "Murphy brought the syringes to the training room, handed them to [Stan] Conte, and told Conte that he had found them in Santiago's locker. Conte responded that he "would take care of it." Murphy recalled that the Giants’ assistant athletic trainer Dave Groeschner also was present in the training room during this conversation."

Personal life

Santiago has a son named Benito Santiago Jr., who is a Puerto Rican professional basketball player who currently plays for the Vaqueros de Bayamón in the Baloncesto Superior Nacional (BSN), the top tier basketball league in Puerto Rico.[39]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r "Benito Santiago Stats". baseball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. 2019. Retrieved April 7, 2019.
  2. ^ Vass, George (June 1995). Here's An All-Overpaid Team of Major Leaguers. Baseball Digest. Books.Google.com. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  3. ^ "Braves Romp and Halt Garciaparra's Streak". The New York Times. August 31, 1997. Retrieved January 2, 2010.
  4. ^ "Benito Finito At 34 Games". sportsillustrated.cnn.com. October 12, 1987. Retrieved October 22, 2011.
  5. ^ "1987 National League Rookie of the Year Award voting results". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  6. ^ "1987 National League Fielding Leaders". Baseball Reference. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  7. ^ "1987 Silver Slugger Award Winners". Baseball Reference. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  8. ^ a b c Reinman, T.R. (December 1988). Mavbe They Ought To Call Him 'Shotgun' Santiago. Baseball Digest. Books.Google.com. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  9. ^ "1988 National League Fielding Leaders". Baseball Reference. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  10. ^ "1988 National League Gold Glove Award winners". Baseball Reference. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  11. ^ "1988 Silver Slugger Award Winners". Baseball Reference. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  12. ^ "1988 National League Team Statistics and Standings". Baseball Reference. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  13. ^ "1989 Benito Santiago Batting Log". Baseball Reference. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  14. ^ "1989 All-Star Game". Baseball Reference. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  15. ^ "1989 National League Gold Glove Award winners". Baseball Reference. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  16. ^ "1989 National League Team Statistics and Standings". Baseball Reference. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  17. ^ "1990 Benito Santiago Batting Log". Baseball Reference. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  18. ^ "1990 Silver Slugger Award Winners". Baseball Reference. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  19. ^ "1990 All-Star Game". Baseball Reference. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  20. ^ "1990 National League Gold Glove winners". Baseball Reference. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  21. ^ a b c "Santiago Benched". Portsmouth Daily Times. Associated Press. June 1, 1991. p. 3. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  22. ^ a b "Santiago apparently through in San Diego". Gainesville Sun. Associated Press. September 22, 1992. p. 4. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  23. ^ "Padres' Santiago Awarded $3.3 Million". Palm Beach Post. February 6, 1992. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  24. ^ "Penny Pinchin' Padres". sportsillustrated.cnn.com. March 29, 1993. Retrieved October 22, 2011.
  25. ^ Yellon, Al (June 9, 2010). "Cubs Select Benito Santiago Jr". SB Nation Chicago. Retrieved May 20, 2019.
  26. ^ "Santiago tags Maddux with first grand slam". The Tuscaloosa News. Associated Press. May 4, 1996. p. 4. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  27. ^ "Santiago expects to play after crash". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. January 6, 1998. p. 7. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  28. ^ "2001 National League Team Statistics and Standings". Baseball Reference. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  29. ^ "Willie Mac Award Winners". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved October 26, 2011.
  30. ^ "2002 San Francisco Giants season". Baseball Reference. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  31. ^ "2002 League Division Series". Baseball Reference. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  32. ^ "2002 League Championship Series". Baseball Reference. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  33. ^ "Benito Santiago post-season batting statistics". Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  34. ^ "2002 World Series". Baseball Reference. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  35. ^ Peters, Nick (September 2003). Armed Behind The Plate. Baseball Digest. Books.Google.com. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  36. ^ Lin, Dennis (July 9, 2015). "Santiago, Templeton elected to Padres HOF". The San Diego Union-Tribune. Archived from the original on July 11, 2015.
  37. ^ Gurnick, Ken, "Ausmus comes to terms with Dodgers; Backstop agrees on one-year deal with option for 2011" MLB.com, January 26, 2010, accessed January 27, 2010
  38. ^ "Giambi, Sheffield also implicated in allegations". ESPN.com. Retrieved August 1, 2008.
  39. ^ Story, Mark. "Mark Story: Benito Santiago Jr. chasing hoop dreams at Cumberlands". Kentucky.com. Retrieved November 4, 2016.

External links

1986 San Diego Padres season

The 1986 San Diego Padres season was the 18th season in franchise history.

1987 San Diego Padres season

The 1987 San Diego Padres season was the 19th in franchise history. Rookie catcher Benito Santiago hit in 34 straight games, and later won the NL Rookie of the Year Award. The Padres were the only team not to hit a grand slam in 1987.

1988 San Diego Padres season

The 1988 San Diego Padres season was the 20th season in franchise history. Tony Gwynn set a National League record by having the lowest batting average (.313) to win a batting title.

1990 San Diego Padres season

The 1990 San Diego Padres season was the 22nd season in franchise history. The team finished with a 75–87 record. They scored 673 runs and allowed 673 runs for a run differential of zero.

1991 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1991 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 62nd playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 9, 1991, at SkyDome in Toronto, the home of the Toronto Blue Jays of the American League. It was only the second time that the game was played outside the United States, as the National League's Montreal Expos hosted the 1982 Midsummer Classic at Olympic Stadium in Montreal, Quebec. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 4-2. Both the winning and losing pitchers represented the Canadian teams; the Blue Jays' Jimmy Key earned the win while the Expos' Dennis Martínez was given the loss. This was also the only All-Star Game to be awarded by Commissioner A. Bartlett Giamatti, who awarded the game to the Blue Jays on Canada Day 1989.

1991 San Diego Padres season

The 1991 San Diego Padres season was the 23rd season in franchise history.

1992 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1992 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 63rd playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 14, 1992, at Jack Murphy Stadium in San Diego, the home of the San Diego Padres of the National League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 13–6.

1993 Florida Marlins season

The 1993 Florida Marlins season was the inaugural year for the team, part of the 1993 Major League Baseball expansion. Their manager was Rene Lachemann. They played home games at Joe Robbie Stadium. They finished 33 games behind the NL Champion Philadelphia Phillies, with a record of 64-98, sixth in the National League East, ahead of only the New York Mets.

1994 Florida Marlins season

The Florida Marlins' 1994 season was the second season for the Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise in the National League. It would begin with the team attempting to improve on their season from 1993. Their manager was Rene Lachemann. They played home games at Joe Robbie Stadium. They finished with a record of 51-64, last in the National League East. The season ended early as a result of the 1994 players strike.

2002 National League Championship Series

The 2002 National League Championship Series (NLCS) was a Major League Baseball playoff series played from October 9 to 14 to determine the champion of the National League, between the Central Division champion St. Louis Cardinals and the wild-card qualifying San Francisco Giants. It was a rematch of the 1987 NLCS, in which the Cardinals defeated the Giants in seven games. The Cardinals, by virtue of being a division winner, had the home field advantage.

The two teams were victorious in the NL Division Series (NLDS), with the Cardinals defeating the West Division champion Arizona Diamondbacks three games to none, and the Giants defeating the East Division champion and heavily favored Atlanta Braves three games to two.

The Giants won the series in five games but were defeated by the Anaheim Angels in seven games in the World Series.

2002 San Francisco Giants season

The 2002 San Francisco Giants season was the 120th in franchise history, the franchise's 45th season in San Francisco, and their third in Pacific Bell Park. The season ended with the Giants winning the National League pennant but losing to the Anaheim Angels in the 2002 World Series.

The Giants finished the regular season with a record of 95–66, ​2 1⁄2 games behind the Arizona Diamondbacks in the National League West standings. By virtue of having the best record among second-place teams in the National League, they won the NL wild card to earn a postseason berth.

In the postseason, the Giants faced the Atlanta Braves in the National League Division Series. After being brought to the brink of elimination, the Giants won Games 4 and 5 to clinch the series, three games to two. They went on to defeat the St. Louis Cardinals in the National League Championship Series by a series score of four games to one to win the franchise's 17th NL championship and its third in San Francisco. Then, in the World Series, they brought the Angels to the brink of elimination before the Angels came from behind to win Games 6 and 7.

2002 was manager Dusty Baker's tenth and final season managing the Giants. Following the season he departed to manage the Chicago Cubs.

2004 Kansas City Royals season

The 2004 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing 5th in the American League Central with a record of 58 wins and 104 losses. It was one of the most disappointing seasons in Royals' history. The team had been picked by many sporting magazines to win the AL Central following their third-place finish in 2003. Injuries of veteran acquisitions did the Royals in. Catcher Benito Santiago and outfielder Juan González both played very few games for the boys in blue. Mike Sweeney was also injured during the campaign. As a result, the Royals set a new record for most losses in franchise history.

Beaumont Golden Gators

The Beaumont Golden Gators were a minor league baseball team in the double A Texas League from 1983 to 1986. Owned by insurance man Ted Moor, the team was an affiliate of the San Diego Padres for their entire tenure. Future Major League Baseball players John Kruk, Roberto Alomar, Joey Cora, Ozzie Guillén, Sandy Alomar, Jr., Shane Mack, and Benito Santiago all played at one time for the Golden Gators. The team played its home games at Vincent-Beck Stadium on the campus of Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas and won the 1983 Texas League championship. Their uniforms were a gaudy gold, white, and green and the hats were of the historic pillbox variety with a white B surrounded by a golden triangle. The cities of Beaumont, Port Arthur, and Orange are known in local parlance as the "Golden Triangle." The oil bust in 1986 caused the local economy to falter and Moor sold the team to a group that moved them to Wichita, Kansas before the 1987 season, becoming the Wichita Pilots. The team spent 21 seasons in Wichita, being renamed to the Wichita Wranglers in 1989, before moving to Springdale, Arkansas and becoming the Northwest Arkansas Naturals. Prior to their time in Beaumont the team had been the Amarillo Gold Sox.

Benito Santiago Jr.

Benito Santiago Jr. (born June 22, 1989) is a Puerto Rican professional basketball player who currently plays for the Vaqueros de Bayamón in the Baloncesto Superior Nacional (BSN), the top tier basketball league in the country. He played college basketball for Cumberlands. He is a former baseball player.

Hitting streak

In baseball, a hitting streak is the number of consecutive official games in which a player appears and gets at least one base hit. According to the Official Baseball Rules, such a streak is not necessarily ended when a player has at least 1 plate appearance and no hits. A streak shall not be terminated if all official plate appearances result in a base on balls, hit by pitch, defensive interference or a sacrifice bunt. The streak shall terminate if the player has a sacrifice fly and no hit.Joe DiMaggio holds the Major League Baseball record with a streak of 56 consecutive games in 1941 which began on May 15 and ended July 17. DiMaggio hit .408 during his streak (91-for-223), with 15 home runs and 55 runs batted in.

List of Major League Baseball career home run leaders

This is a list of the top 300 Major League Baseball leaders in home runs hit. In the sport of baseball, a home run is a hit in which the batter scores by circling all the bases and reaching home plate in one play, without the benefit of a fielding error. This can be accomplished either by hitting the ball out of play while it is still in fair territory (a conventional home run), or by an inside-the-park home run.

Barry Bonds holds the Major League Baseball home run record with 762. He passed Hank Aaron, who hit 755, on August 7, 2007. The only other player to have hit 700 or more is Babe Ruth with 714. Alex Rodriguez (696), Willie Mays (660), Albert Pujols (648), Ken Griffey, Jr. (630), Jim Thome (612), and Sammy Sosa (609) are the only other players to have hit 600 or more.

Listed are all Major League Baseball players with 218 or more home runs hit during official regular season games (i.e., excluding playoffs or exhibition games). Players in bold face are active as of the 2019 Major League Baseball season (including free agents), with the number in parenthesis designating the number of home runs they have hit during the 2019 season. The last change in the cutoff for the top 300 occurred on July 12, 2019, when Carlos Santana hit his 218th career home run, displacing Benito Santiago.

List of Silver Slugger Award winners at catcher

The Silver Slugger Award is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position in both the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), as determined by the coaches and managers of Major League Baseball (MLB). These voters consider several offensive categories in selecting the winners, including batting average, slugging percentage, and on-base percentage (OBP), in addition to "coaches' and managers' general impressions of a player's overall offensive value". Managers and coaches are not permitted to vote for players on their own team. The Silver Slugger was first awarded in 1980 and is given by Hillerich & Bradsby, the manufacturer of Louisville Slugger bats. The award is a bat-shaped trophy, 3 feet (91 cm) tall, engraved with the names of each of the winners from the league and plated with sterling silver.Among catchers, Mike Piazza has won the most Silver Slugger Awards, with ten consecutive wins in the National League between 1993 and 2002; this is the most Silver Sluggers won consecutively by any player in Major League Baseball. In the American League, Iván Rodríguez has won the most Silver Sluggers, with six consecutive wins from 1994 to 1999, and a seventh when he tied with Víctor Martínez in 2004. Lance Parrish won the American League award six times (1980, 1982–1984, 1986, and 1990), and Joe Mauer and Jorge Posada have won it five times; Mauer won in 2006, 2008–2010 and 2013, while Posada won in 2000–2003 and 2007. Hall of Famer Gary Carter (1981–1983, 1984–1986) and Brian McCann (2006, 2008-2011) are five-time winners in the National League. Other multiple awardees include Buster Posey (four wins; 2012, 2014–2015, 2017), Benito Santiago (four wins; 1987–1988, 1990–1991), Mickey Tettleton (three wins; 1989, 1991–1992) and Carlton Fisk (three wins; 1981, 1985, 1988). J. T. Realmuto and Salvador Pérez are the most recent National and American League winners, respectively.

Piazza holds several Major League records for catchers in a Silver Slugger-winning season; most were set in 1997. That season, he had an on-base percentage of .431, and had 124 runs batted in (a total he matched in 1999) to lead the award-winning catchers in those statistical categories. Javy López holds the Major League records among winners for home runs (43) and slugging percentage (.687); these were set in 2003. Mauer holds the Major League record in batting average with a .365 clip he set in 2009. Mauer also leads the American League in on-base percentage (.444 in 2009) and slugging percentage (.587 in 2009). Parrish batted in 114 runs in 1983, and Fisk hit 37 home runs in 1985.

Miss Dominican Republic 1963

Señorita República Dominicana 1963 was held on January 29, 1963. There were 14 candidates who competed for the national crown. The Miss Azúcar represented the Dominican Republic at the Miss Universe 1963 . The Miss Café will enter Miss International 1963. The Miss Merengue will enter Feria de la Chinita. Only the 14 province entered. On the top 10 they showed their evening gown and answered questions so they could go to the top 5. In the top 5 they would answer more questions. There are only 14 delegates due to the reason low economy in each province and the country.

Silver Slugger Award

The Silver Slugger Award is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position in both the American League and the National League, as determined by the coaches and managers of Major League Baseball. These voters consider several offensive categories in selecting the winners, including batting average, slugging percentage, and on-base percentage, in addition to "coaches' and managers' general impressions of a player's overall offensive value". Managers and coaches are not permitted to vote for players on their own team. The Silver Slugger was first awarded in 1980 and is given by Hillerich & Bradsby, the manufacturer of Louisville Slugger bats. The award is a bat-shaped trophy, 3 feet (91 cm) tall, engraved with the names of each of the winners from the league and plated with sterling silver.The prize is presented to outfielders irrespective of their specific position. This means that it is possible for three left fielders, or any other combination of outfielders, to win the award in the same year, rather than one left fielder, one center fielder, and one right fielder. In addition, only National League pitchers receive a Silver Slugger Award; lineups in the American League include a designated hitter in place of the pitcher in the batting order, so the designated hitter receives the award instead.Home run record-holder Barry Bonds won twelve Silver Slugger Awards in his career as an outfielder, the most of any player. He also won the award in five consecutive seasons twice in his career: from 1990 to 1994, and again from 2000 to 2004. Retired former New York Mets catcher Mike Piazza and former New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez are tied for second, with ten wins each. Rodriguez' awards are split between two positions; he won seven Silver Sluggers as a shortstop for the Seattle Mariners and Texas Rangers, and three with the Yankees as a third baseman. Wade Boggs leads third basemen with eight Silver Slugger Awards; Barry Larkin leads shortstops with nine. Other leaders include Ryne Sandberg (seven wins as a second baseman) and Mike Hampton (five wins as a pitcher). Todd Helton and Albert Pujols are tied for the most wins among first baseman with four, although Pujols has won two awards at other positions. David Ortiz has won seven awards at designated hitter position, the most at that position.

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