Ben Oglivie

Benjamin Ambrosio Oglivie Palmer (born February 11, 1949) is a former Major League Baseball left fielder for the Boston Red Sox (1971–1973), Detroit Tigers (1974–1977), and the Milwaukee Brewers (1978–1986). He also played two seasons in Japan for the Kintetsu Buffaloes (1987–1988). He batted and threw left-handed.

Oglivie debuted on September 4, 1971, for the Red Sox and played his final game on October 5, 1986, for the Brewers. Oglivie hit for power fairly well, breaking the 40-home run mark in 1980 with 41, which was good for a tie (with Reggie Jackson) for the league lead. Oglivie hit three home runs in a game three times. In the process, Oglivie became the first non-U.S. born player to lead the American League in home runs.

In a 16-year career, he posted a .273 batting average with 235 home runs and 901 RBIs in 1,754 games. He had 87 career stolen bases and 784 runs scored. Oglivie picked up 1,615 hits in 5913 at bats.

Oglivie played for the Kintetsu Buffaloes in Japan after retiring from MLB and hit 46 home runs in two seasons. He then returned to attempt a comeback in the minors, but never made it back to the majors again.

He has coached at various levels for a number of different organizations, including Milwaukee, Pittsburgh, San Diego, Tampa Bay, and Detroit.

The Colón, Panama native was one of six post-1959 players selected as part of the 2012 class inducted in the Latino Baseball Hall of Fame. Each Latin-American country (Puerto Rico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Mexico, and Venezuela) had one player chosen for enshrinement, which took place in February 2012.

Ben Oglivie
Left fielder
Born: February 11, 1949 (age 70)
Colón, Panama
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
September 4, 1971, for the Boston Red Sox
Last MLB appearance
October 5, 1986, for the Milwaukee Brewers
MLB statistics
Batting average.273
Home runs235
Runs batted in901
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

External links

1968 Major League Baseball draft

The 1968 Major League Baseball (MLB) draft took place prior to the 1968 MLB season. The draft saw the New York Mets take shortstop Tim Foli first overall.

1973 Boston Red Sox season

The 1973 Boston Red Sox season was the 73rd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League East with a record of 89 wins and 73 losses, eight games behind the Baltimore Orioles.

1974 Detroit Tigers season

The 1974 Detroit Tigers compiled a record of 72–90. They finished in last place in the American League East, 19 games behind the Baltimore Orioles. They were outscored by their opponents 768 to 620.

1975 Detroit Tigers season

The 1975 Detroit Tigers compiled a record of 57–102, the fifth worst season in Detroit Tigers history. They finished in last place in the American League East, 37½ games behind the Boston Red Sox. Their team batting average of .249 and team ERA of 4.27 were the second worst in the American League. They were outscored by their opponents 786 to 570.

1976 Detroit Tigers season

The 1976 Detroit Tigers season was a season in American baseball. The team finished in fifth place in the American League East with a record of 74–87, 24 games behind the New York Yankees. They were outscored by their opponents 709 to 609. The Tigers drew 1,467,020 fans to Tiger Stadium in 1976, ranking 4th of the 14 teams in the American League.

1977 Detroit Tigers season

The 1977 Detroit Tigers finished in fourth place in the American League East with a record of 74–88, 26 games behind the New York Yankees. They were outscored by their opponents 751 to 714. The Tigers drew 1,359,856 fans to Tiger Stadium in 1977, ranking 7th of the 14 teams in the American League.

1978 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1978 Milwaukee Brewers season involved the Brewers finishing third in the American League East with a record of 93 wins and 69 losses.

1979 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1979 Milwaukee Brewers season involved the Brewers' finishing second in the American League East with a record of 95 wins and 66 losses.

1980 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1980 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 51st midseason exhibition between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was played on July 8, 1980, at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California, home of the Los Angeles Dodgers of the National League. The game resulted in a 4-2 victory for the NL.

While this would mark the second time that the Dodgers had hosted the All-Star Game in Los Angeles, it was the first time that the game was being held at Dodger Stadium. Their first time as host in 1959 saw the game played at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum; the Dodgers' Los Angeles home field until the construction of Dodger Stadium.

This All-Star Game would be known for some exemplary pitching performances, most notably AL starter Steve Stone's (three perfect innings, three strikeouts). Jerry Reuss struck out the side for the NL in the sixth, as well.

It would also be one of the final games for NL starter J. R. Richard. Richard was diagnosed with a career-ending stroke weeks later.

The pregame ceremonies of the All-Star Game featured Disney characters. Later, Edwards Air Force Base of Rosamond, California, provided both the colors presentation and, after the Los Angeles All-City Band performed the Canadian and U.S. National Anthems, the flyover ceremonies. This All-Star Game marked the first nationally televised US performance of O Canada after it had officially been designated the Canadian National Anthem eight days earlier on July 1, 1980. It also marked the debut of the modern-day large-scale video screen, with the first such video scoreboard, Diamond Vision by Mitsubishi Electric, being introduced at this game.

1982 American League Championship Series

The 1982 American League Championship Series was played between the Milwaukee Brewers and the California Angels from October 5 to 10, 1982. Milwaukee won the series three games to two to advance to the franchise's first World Series, where they would lose to the St. Louis Cardinals, four games to three. The 1982 ALCS was marked by a dramatic comeback by the Brewers, who lost the first two games of the series and were trailing late in the final game. This is also the first of only two Championship Series between Milwaukee and a Los Angeles team, the other being 2018.

The series was noteworthy as being the first to feature a matchup between two "expansion" teams (i.e., franchises not included among the sixteen operating in the major leagues for most of the first half of the twentieth century), for featuring two teams that had never before won a pennant, and for being the first time a team came from a 2-0 deficit to win the series.

This was the first ALCS not to feature the Athletics, Orioles, or Yankees.

1982 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1982 Milwaukee Brewers season resulted in the team winning its first and only American League Championship.

As a team, the Brewers led Major League Baseball in a number of offensive categories, including at bats (5733), runs scored (891), home runs (216), runs batted in (843), slugging percentage (.455), on-base plus slugging (.789), total bases (2606) and extra-base hits (534).

1982 World Series

The 1982 World Series featured the St. Louis Cardinals and the Milwaukee Brewers, with the Cardinals winning in seven games.

The Cardinals had last been in the World Series in 1968, and a Milwaukee team, the Braves, in 1958. The Milwaukee team of 1982 started as an expansion team in Seattle in 1969, which then moved to Milwaukee in 1970 and changed their name to the Brewers.The Cardinals made it to the Series by winning the National League East division by three games over the Philadelphia Phillies, and then defeating the Atlanta Braves by 3 games to none in the National League Championship Series. The Brewers made it by winning the American League East division by one game over the Baltimore Orioles, and then defeating the California Angels by 3 games to 2 in the American League Championship Series.

With the Cardinals winning this series, the National League achieved four straight World Series championships from 1979 to 1982. The National League would not again achieve even back-to-back victories until the Giants won in 2010 and the Cardinals in 2011.

Though the teams had never met before, their home cities had an existing commercial rivalry in the beer market, as St. Louis is the home of Anheuser–Busch, which owned the Cardinals at the time, while Milwaukee is the home of Miller Brewing and other past major competitors of Anheuser–Busch. This led the media to refer to it as the "Suds Series."

Greenville Spinners

The Greenville Spinners were a minor league baseball team located in Greenville, South Carolina.

They played in the Carolina Association from 1908–1912, the South Atlantic League from 1919–1930, 1946–1950 and 1961–1962, the Palmetto League in 1931 and the Tri-State League from 1954–1955.

The team had affiliation deals with the Washington Senators (1939–1941), Chicago White Sox (1946), Brooklyn Dodgers (1947–1950) and Los Angeles Dodgers (1961–1962).

List of Major League Baseball players from Panama

This is an alphabetical list of 48 baseball players from Panama who played in Major League Baseball between 1955 and 2017. The first Panamanian ever to appear in the Majors was Humberto Robinson.

List of Milwaukee Brewers award winners and All-Stars

The Milwaukee Brewers professional baseball franchise dates to its 1969 founding in Washington as the Seattle Pilots. In 1970 the team relocated to Wisconsin, settling in Milwaukee.

In 1998, the team moved from the American League to the National League.This list, which is correct as of the end of the 2014 season, documents Pilots and Brewers players who have won league awards or were selected for mid-season Major League Baseball All-Star Game teams.

List of Nippon Professional Baseball players (O)

The following is a list of Nippon Professional Baseball players with the last name starting with O, retired or active.

Milwaukee Brewers

The Milwaukee Brewers are an American professional baseball team based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The Brewers compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) Central division. The team is named for the city's association with the brewing industry. Since 2001, the Brewers have played their home games at Miller Park, which has a seating capacity of 41,900.

The team was founded in 1969 as the Seattle Pilots, an expansion team of the American League (AL), in Seattle, Washington. The Pilots played their home games at Sick's Stadium. After only one season, the team relocated to Milwaukee, becoming known as the Brewers and playing their home games at Milwaukee County Stadium. In 1998, the Brewers joined the National League. They are the only franchise to play in four divisions since the advent of divisional play in Major League Baseball in 1969. They are also one of two current MLB franchises to switch leagues in their history, the other one being the Houston Astros.

The team's only World Series appearance came in 1982. After winning the ALCS against the California Angels, the Brewers faced off against the St. Louis Cardinals in the World Series, losing 4–3. In 2011, the Brewers defeated the Arizona Diamondbacks to win the NLDS 3–2, but lost in the NLCS to the eventual World Series champion Cardinals 4–2.

Outfielder

An outfielder is a person playing in one of the three defensive positions in baseball or softball, farthest from the batter. These defenders are the left fielder, the center fielder, and the right fielder. As an outfielder, their duty is to catch fly balls and/ ground balls then to return them to the infield for the out or before the runner advances, if there is any runners on the bases. As an outfielder, they normally play behind the six players located in the field.

By convention, each of the nine defensive positions in baseball is numbered. The outfield positions are 7 (left field), 8 (center field) and 9 (right field). These numbers are shorthand designations useful in baseball scorekeeping and are not necessarily the same as the squad numbers worn on player uniforms.

Outfielders named to the MLB All-Century Team are Hank Aaron, Ty Cobb, Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, Willie Mays, Stan Musial, Pete Rose, Babe Ruth, Ted Williams and Ken Griffey Jr.

Putout

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by one of the following methods:

Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout)

Catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a force out)

Catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play

Catching a third strike (a strikeout)

Catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout)

Being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference

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