Bedford

Bedford is the county town of Bedfordshire, England. The town has an estimated (2017) population of 87,590, whereas the Borough of Bedford had an estimated population of 169,912.[1]

Bedford was founded at a ford on the River Great Ouse, and is thought to have been the burial place of Offa of Mercia. Bedford Castle was built by Henry I, although it was destroyed in 1224. Bedford was granted borough status in 1165 and has been represented in Parliament since 1265. It is well known for its large population of Italian descent.[2]

Bedford is on the Midland Main Line, with stopping services to London and Brighton operated by Thameslink, and express services to London and the East Midlands operated by East Midlands Trains.

Bedford
Bedford - St.Paul's Church and Town Bridge - geograph.org.uk - 304389

St Paul's Church and Town Bridge
Bedford is located in Bedfordshire
Bedford
Bedford
Bedford shown within Bedfordshire
Population87,590 
OS grid referenceTL055495
• London46 miles (74 km) S
Unitary authority
Ceremonial county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townBEDFORD
Postcode districtMK40–MK45
Dialling code01234
PoliceBedfordshire
FireBedfordshire and Luton
AmbulanceEast of England
EU ParliamentEast of England
UK Parliament

History

The name of the town is thought to derive from the name of a Saxon chief called Beda,[3] and a ford crossing the River Great Ouse. Bedford was a market town for the surrounding agricultural region from the early Middle Ages The Anglo-Saxon King Offa of Mercia was buried in the town in 796;[4] this is believed to be in his new minster, now the Church of St Paul,[5] or on the banks of the Great Ouse where his tomb was soon lost to the river.[6] In 886 it became a boundary town separating Wessex and Danelaw.[7][8] It was the seat of the Barony of Bedford. In 919 Edward the Elder built the town's first known fortress, on the south side of the River Great Ouse and there received the area's submission. This fortress was destroyed by the Danes. William II gave the barony of Bedford to Paine de Beauchamp who built a new, strong castle.

Bedford traces its borough charter in 1166 by Henry II[9] and elected two members to the unreformed House of Commons. It remained a small agricultural town, with wool being an important industry in the area for much of the Middle Ages. The new Bedford Castle was razed in 1224 and today only a mound remains.[10] From the 16th century Bedford and much of Bedfordshire became one of the main centres of England's lace industry, and lace continued to be an important industry in Bedford until the early 20th century. In 1660 John Bunyan was imprisoned for 12 years in Bedford Gaol. It was here that he wrote The Pilgrim's Progress.[11] The River Great Ouse became navigable as far as Bedford in 1689. Wool declined in importance with brewing becoming a major industry in the town. The 19th century saw Bedford transform into an important engineering hub. In 1832 gas lighting was introduced, and the railway reached Bedford in 1846. The first corn exchange was built 1849,[12] and the first drains and sewers were dug in 1864.[13]

Bedford - John Speed's map (1611)

Bedford in 1611

Bedford Bridge from Antiquities of England by (1783) by Francis Grose

Bedford Bridge in 1783. This version of the bridge was replaced in 1813.

Bedford engraved by J.Roper after G.Cole published 1806

Bedford in 1806

Governance

Bedford is the largest settlement in Borough of Bedford. The borough council is led by a directly elected mayor who holds the title 'Mayor of Bedford', an office which was first held by Frank Branston, until his death in 2009. The current Mayor of Bedford is Dave Hodgson from the Liberal Democrat Party.

Bedford itself is divided into 10 wards: Brickhill, Castle, Cauldwell, De Parys, Goldington, Harpur, Kingsbrook, Newnham, Putnoe, Queens Park, Kempston East and Kempston West. Brickhill elects its own parish council, while the rest (and majority) of Bedford is an unparished area.

Bedford is served by Bedfordshire Police. The Bedfordshire Police and Crime Commissioner of that force is Kathryn Holloway.

Bedford forms part of the Bedford constituency, represented in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom Parliament. The current Member of Parliament (MP) for Bedford is Mohammad Yasin, who is a member of the Labour Party.

Geography

Bedford is 46 miles (74 km) miles north-northwest of London, 65 miles (105 km) southeast of Birmingham, 25 miles (40 km) west of Cambridge and 19 miles (31 km) east-southeast of Northampton. The town of Kempston is adjacent to Bedford, as are the villages of Elstow, Renhold and Ravensden. Wixams is a new town which is being developed to the south of Bedford. Villages in the Borough of Bedford with populations of more than 2,000 as of 2005 were Biddenham, Bromham, Clapham, Elstow, Oakley, Sharnbrook, Shortstown, Wilstead, and Wootton. There are also many smaller villages in the borough. The villages in the borough are popular with commuters to Bedford, and also with people who commute to Milton Keynes, London and towns in Northamptonshire and Cambridgeshire.

Bedford river
River Great Ouse in Bedford from Town Bridge, looking downstream. The old Coaching Inn, the Swan Hotel is on the left behind the tree. Bedford Rowing Club and the multistorey Bedford Park Inn are on the right.

Nearby small towns include Ampthill, Biggleswade, Flitwick, and Sandy, all of which are in Central Bedfordshire, as well as Rushden in Northamptonshire and St Neots in Cambridgeshire. The nearest towns and cities with larger populations than Bedford are Northampton to the north west, Cambridge to the east, Milton Keynes to the south west, and Luton to the south, all of which have urban area populations of 150,000 or more.

Climate

As with the rest of the United Kingdom, Bedford has a maritime climate, with a limited range of temperatures, and generally even rainfall throughout the year. The nearest Met Office weather station to Bedford is Bedford (Thurleigh) airport, about 6.5 miles north of Bedford town centre at an elevation of 85 metres. Since 1980, temperature extremes at the site have ranged from 35.9 °C(97F)[14] in August 2003 and 35.3 °C(95F)[15] during July 2006 down to −15.3 °C(4F)[16] in January 1982. However, such extremes would likely be superseded if longer term records were available – Historically, the nearest weather station to Bedford was Cardington about 2.4 miles south south east of the town centre with an elevation of 30 metres. This location recorded a minimum of −18.3 °C(-1F)[17] during January 1963.

Rainfall averages around 585mm (23.03 in) a year, with an excess of 1mm (.04in) falling on 109 days.

Sunshine at around 1500 hours a year is typical of inland areas of southern-central England.

Climate data for Bedford (Thurleigh) 85m, 1971–2000
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 6.4
(43.5)
6.9
(44.4)
9.7
(49.5)
12.0
(53.6)
15.7
(60.3)
18.6
(65.5)
21.5
(70.7)
21.5
(70.7)
18.2
(64.8)
14.0
(57.2)
9.5
(49.1)
7.2
(45.0)
13.5
(56.3)
Average low °C (°F) 0.8
(33.4)
0.6
(33.1)
2.3
(36.1)
3.6
(38.5)
6.2
(43.2)
9.3
(48.7)
11.5
(52.7)
11.6
(52.9)
9.7
(49.5)
6.6
(43.9)
3.3
(37.9)
1.8
(35.2)
5.6
(42.1)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 48.4
(1.91)
36.6
(1.44)
43.5
(1.71)
47.2
(1.86)
45.3
(1.78)
56.9
(2.24)
44.7
(1.76)
48.6
(1.91)
53.6
(2.11)
56.8
(2.24)
49.0
(1.93)
53.8
(2.12)
584.4
(23.01)
Mean monthly sunshine hours 58.6 76.3 99.5 153.0 183.8 185.7 200.9 188.5 139.8 114.1 72.0 51.5 1,523.6
Source: [18]

Demography

Bedford is home to one of the largest concentrations of Italian immigrants in the United Kingdom. According to the 2001 census, almost 30% of Bedford's population were of at least partial Italian descent. This is mainly as a result of labour recruitment in the early 1950s by the London Brick Company from Southern Italy.[19] From 1954 to 2008 Bedford had its own Italian vice-consulate.[20]

In addition to Italian immigrants, Bedford has also been the recipient of significant immigration from India (8.1% of Bedford's population;[21] (Indians began arriving from the late 1950s onwards from the Punjab area and many worked at the London Brick Company), Eastern Europe (particularly in the 2000s), Greece, Cyprus, Malta, The Middle East and Africa (3% of Bedford's population is of Sub-Saharan descent[21][22]), making it one of the most ethnically and linguistically diverse towns in the United Kingdom in proportion to its size.[23] The population of Bedford together with Kempston is 107,590, but it is 163,924 for the urban area.

In the 2011 census, Bedford was 74.1% White, 15.4% Asian, 5.4% Black, and 4.1% Mixed/multiple.[24]

Landmarks

River Great Ouse

The River Great Ouse passes through the town centre and is lined with gardens known as the Embankment. Within these gardens, opposite Rothsay Road, stands a war memorial to the men of the town killed in the First World War.[25] The memorial was designed in 1921 by the sculptor Charles Sargeant Jagger and depicts a knight killing a dragon.[26] The inscription reads

1914 † 1919
TO BEDFORDIANS WHO DIED, MANY IN EARLY YOUTH, SOME FULL OF YEARS AND HONOUR, BUT WHO ALL ALIKE GAVE THEIR LIVES FOR THEIR COUNTRY.

Bedford Castle

Bedford Castle Mound is the remnant of Bedford's medieval castle, located close to the centre of the modern town, less than a hundred yards from Bedford Bridge and the High Street. In around 2000 Bedford Borough Council built a sloping retaining wall on the south side, facing the river. Although almost completely modern, the wall does incorporate a few pieces of historic masonry. A paved path leads round the side of the mound up to the top, which is a flat circular grassy area. A small wooden structure of the same date at the top of the wall, much like a bus shelter, protects tourists from the rain while they view the river embankment.

St Paul's Church

Bedford's principal church is St Paul's, in the square of the same name at the historic centre of the town. It is the Civic Church of the Borough of Bedford and County of Bedfordshire and has a tall, iconic spire which is one of the dominant features of the town. There was an early Minster church on the site by 1066 and work on the present structure began in the early 13th century, but little remains from that period. John Bunyan and John Wesley both preached in the church. In 1865–1868 the tower and spire were completely rebuilt and the two transepts added and lesser alterations have been made since. From 1941 to the end of the Second World War the BBC's daily service was broadcast from St. Paul's.[27] Another notable local church is St Peter's, on St Peter's Street, which contains some of the oldest architectural remains in Bedford, the most ancient being the two monoliths.

Bedford Park is the town's largest urban park and is located directly to the north of the town centre. The park retains many original features from its Victorian design and construction, including a cricket pavilion and bandstand which are both still in use. Priory Country Park is a large country park located on the northern bank of the River Great Ouse in eastern Bedford. Both parks have been awarded Green Flag status.

Just outside the town lie the Cardington airship hangars. The hangars have been used to shoot scenes for movies such as Star Wars, Batman Begins, The Dark Knight,[28] and Inception.[29] The hangars can be seen from the Bedford Bypass.

Despite being far upriver from the sea, seals have occasionally been reported as swimming as far inland as Bedford.[30][31][32]

View of the Bedford skyline, taken from Renhold in 2013.
View of the Bedford skyline, taken from Renhold in 2013.

Transport

Transport in Bedford provides links between the town and other parts of England. Road access to the town is provided by the A6 road & the A421 road. The town is served by two railway stations and a network of bus services.

Bedford bus station

Bedford bus station - geograph.org.uk - 496438
Bedford bus station in July 2007

Bedford bus station serves the town of Bedford, and was reopened on 29 March 2015 after undergoing £8.8million regeneration which began in 2013. The new Greyfriars surface car park and the refurbished Allhallows multi-story car park both implement a pay on foot system. Greyfriars occupies 142 parking spaces, including 7 designated disabled spaces, although there is a 2-hour per day parking limit.[33] The main operator at Bedford bus station is Stagecoach in Bedford and Stagecoach in Northants.[34]

Education

Bedford previously operated a three-tier education system, which was arranged into lower, middle and upper schools, as recommended in the Plowden Report of 1967. The arrangement was put to the vote in 2006 with a view to moving to the two-tier model, but was rejected.[35] On 17 November 2009, borough councillors voted 19 to 17 in favour of a two tier system, which would then be phased in. However, following the defeat of the Labour Government in 2010, the new coalition government announced that the funding necessary for the switch to a two-tier system would no longer be available. As a result, the switch proceeded on a school by school basis as national funding was due to cover most of the cost. However, in July 2015, the Council announced the intention to support the transition to a system of two tier education across the whole Borough in a coordinated way. At the time, only the Wootton cluster of schools chose to not to transition. As of September 2018 all of the towns schools have converted to two-tier. The secondary schools currently operating in the town are Bedford Academy, Bedford Free School, Biddenham International School, Castle Newnham School, Goldington Academy, Mark Rutherford School and St Thomas More Catholic School.

Bedford is home to four private schools run by the Harpur Trust charity, endowed by Bedfordian Sir William Harpur in the 16th century. These are:

  • Bedford School for boys aged 7–18
  • Bedford Modern School, a former boys' school which became co-educational in 2003 for pupils aged 7–18
  • Bedford Girls' School for girls aged 7–18. (Merged September 2012 – Formerly Bedford High School for Girls and Dame Alice Harpur School)
  • Pilgrims Pre-Preparatory School

Smaller private institutions include Rushmoor School (boys aged 3–16, girls 3–11) St. Andrew's School (girls aged 3–16, boys 3–9), and Polam School (boys and girls aged 12 months to 9 years), none of which are part of the Harpur Trust.

Bedford hosts a campus of the University of Bedfordshire, which prior to a merger with the University of Luton in 2006 had been a campus of De Montfort University (itself now solely based in Leicester). For further education, the town is served by Bedford College. Additionally, Stella Mann College is a private college, which offers a range of further education courses relating to the performing arts.

Religious sites

QPSikhTemple
The Guru Nanak Gurdwara in Queens Park

The town has a high number of Christian churches: including the Civic and County Church of St Paul's and the Church of St Peter's, both already noted above. There are four from the Newfrontiers network, several Polish and Italian Roman Catholic churches, LDS (Mormon) meetinghouses, and various independent churches that cater to the different ethnic and language groups. There are four mosques located in the town.

Bedford has the largest Sikh temple in the United Kingdom outside London, alongside two other Sikh temples; one of which is in Kempston. Bedford has Guru Ravidass and Valmiki temples.

There are Quaker, Jehovah's Witness and Wiccan communities who meet in the town. There is no longer a synagogue in Bedford, but Bedfordshire Progressive Synagogue,[36] based in Luton, meets in Bedford once a month for the town's Jewish community. The nearest Orthodox synagogue is the Luton Hebrew Congregation, a Lubavitch synagogue in Luton. Bedford is the former headquarters of the Panacea Society who believed that the town would have an important role in the Second Coming of Jesus Christ, and that Bedford was the original location of the Garden of Eden.[37]

Culture

BedfordCornExchange
Bedford Corn Exchange

The Higgins Art Gallery & Museum, Bedford is housed in the recreated Victorian home of the Higgins family of Victorian brewers and in a modern extension. The museum has local history collections, while the galleries have notable collections of watercolours, prints and drawings, ceramics, glass and lace.

The Panacea Museum tells the story of the Panacea Society, a religious community formed in the early twentieth century.

The Bedford Corn Exchange is the largest entertainment venue in the town and plays host to a variety of performances, meetings, conferences, concerts and private functions. The venue has been host to many great entertainers such as Glenn Miller and Bob Hope.

The University of Bedfordshire Theatre is the largest theatre in Bedford and hosts many larger productions as well as projects from the university. There is an active amdram (community theatre) scene, with groups such as the Swan Theatre Company, Bedford Drama Company (formerly Bedford Dramatic Club), Bedford Marianettes and ShowCo Bedford producing plays and musicals in venues like the Corn Exchange. The Bedford Pantomime Company produces a traditional pantomime at the Bedford Corn Exchange each Christmas. Esquires (one of the town's premier live music venues) regularly plays host to many notable bands and acts from all over the United Kingdom as well as showcasing local live music.

Every two years, an event called the "Bedford River Festival" is held near the river in Bedford during early July. The event lasts for two days and regularly attracts about 250,000 visitors. The event includes sports, funfairs and live music. It is the second largest regular outdoor event in the United Kingdom, beaten in numbers only by the Notting Hill Carnival.[38] The Bedford Regatta each May is Britain's largest one-day river rowing regatta.

Other annual events include "Bedford by the Sea" (when large quantities of sand are deposited in the town centre) and the "Bedford International Kite Festival" in June. "Proms in the Park", held in early August, is a popular musical event.

Sports

There is a long-standing sporting heritage in Bedford Borough with long established rugby and football clubs. Bedford has four rugby union teams called Bedford Blues, Bedford Queens, Bedford Swifts and Bedford Athletic, and, since 2004, has also a rugby league team; Bedford Tigers, who compete one tier below the National Conference. Bedford Blues are currently in the second tier of English rugby, but have previously been in the top division. Bedford Blues RFC's Goldington Road ground holds in the region of 5,000 spectators with an average gate of 3,000 for home games.

Taking into account the size of its overall urban area, Bedford is one of the largest towns in England without a fully professional football team. Bedford Town F.C. currently plays at the eighth level of the English football league system and Bedford F.C. play at the 11th level.

Bedford-rowing-club-2012-07-08 14.46.01
Bedford rowing club boathouse.

Rowing is also a major part of the sports scene with a number of regatta events hosted throughout the year from February to October; the most significant of these being Bedford Regatta, which in terms of numbers of crews participating is the second largest in the country. It was on Bedford's River Great Ouse that Olympic rower, Tim Foster, honed his skills as a student of Bedford Modern and member of star club; indeed the borough has produced many other champions of sport past and present including Stephanie Cook, Gail Emms, Liz Yelling and Paula Radcliffe who is Life Vice-President of Bedford & County Athletic Club

Viking Kayak Club organise the Bedford Kayak Marathon with canoe racing held along the Embankment on Bedford's riverside and organise national ranking Canoe Slalom events at the Cardington Artificial Slalom Course (CASC), which was the first artificial whitewater course in the United Kingdom. CASC is also the venue each year for the United Kingdom's National Inter Clubs Slalom Finals, the largest canoe slalom event by participation in the United Kingdom. Etienne Stott – 2012 Olympic Gold Medallist's Club.

Bedford and the surrounding borough was a major host of national teams preparing for the 2012 Summer Olympics and Paralympics. The Maldives National Olympic Committee based its competing athletes in the town and borough, while Paralympic athletes from Angola, the Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Gambia, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Jamaica, Lesotho, Morocco, Niger, Pakistan, Senegal, Tunisia and Uganda were also be based in the area. With the exception of Weymouth (which hosted various sailing events) Bedford accommodated more Olympic teams in 2012 than any other town or borough in the United Kingdom.[39]

It is also home to the United Kingdom's largest outdoor fitness company, Be Military Fit which operates in Bedford Park.

Filmography

  • The popular BBC TV series Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em was filmed in and around Bedford during the 1970s.[40]
  • In the 2005 motion picture Batman Begins scenes were filmed at the Cardington Sheds near Bedford and featured extras from Bedford. The sequel, 'The Dark Knight', was also partially filmed at the sheds using the fake working name 'Rory's First Kiss' and members of the production cast stayed at various hotels around the town.
  • In the 2006 Comedy Central and DVD versions of Russell Peters' Outsourced, a good natured Bedfordian bears the brunt of Russell's comedic segment "I'm From England".

Public services

Bedford Hospital is a district general hospital that operates from two sites in the town, providing a wide range of services, although patients requiring advanced health services are referred to specialist units elsewhere, particularly Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge, which has a partnership with Bedford Hospital. Bedford Hospital's catchment area is based on the Borough of Bedford and parts of Central Bedfordshire.

The Bedfordshire Police is responsible for policing in Bedford, and operates a main police station in the town centre. Fire and rescue services in Bedford are coordinated by the Bedfordshire and Luton Fire and Rescue Service. Bedford's fire station is in the Newnham area of the town, and is staffed 24 hours a day.

See also

References

  1. ^ Bedford Borough Council (2017). "Population and place". ONS Data. Retrieved 21 December 2018.
  2. ^ The Guardian. "Italians in Bedford".
  3. ^ "Brief History of Bedford". Bedford Borough Council. Retrieved 29 March 2011.
  4. ^ Simon Keynes, "Cynethryth", in Lapidge, Encyclopaedia of Anglo-Saxon England, p. 133.
  5. ^ Haslam, Jeremy (1986). "The Ecclesiastical Topography of Early Medieval Bedford". Bedfordshire Archaeological Council Publications. 17 (17): 41–2, 46, 48.
  6. ^ https://hefenfelth.wordpress.com/2014/08/04/king-offas-tomb/ Retrieved 29 December 2016
  7. ^ "Bedford Timeline, Earliest Times – 1800". Bedfordshire Libraries. Archived from the original on 1 December 2008. Retrieved 10 February 2008.
  8. ^ Whitelock, Dorothy; Douglas, David C. (ed) (1979). English Historical Documents c. 500–1042 (2nd edition). Routledge. Retrieved 10 February 2008.CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link)
  9. ^ "Brief History of Bedford". Bedford Borough Council. Retrieved 10 February 2008.
  10. ^ "Bedford Castle". CastleUK. Archived from the original on 5 March 2008. Retrieved 10 February 2008.
  11. ^ "John Bunyan (1628–1688)". The Bunyan Press. Archived from the original on 26 July 2007. Retrieved 10 February 2008.
  12. ^ "1849 & Friday 1 March 1850". Bedford Corn Exchange. Retrieved 10 February 2008.
  13. ^ "Bedford Borough records introduction". Bedfordshire County Council. Archived from the original on 27 August 2008. Retrieved 10 February 2008.
  14. ^ "2003 Maximum". Retrieved 3 March 2011.
  15. ^ "2006 Maximum". Archived from the original on 29 June 2011. Retrieved 3 March 2011.
  16. ^ "1982 Minimum". Retrieved 3 March 2011.
  17. ^ "1963 Minimum". Archived from the original on 15 July 2011. Retrieved 3 March 2011.
  18. ^ "Bedford 1971–2000 averages". Met Office. July 2011. Archived from the original on 9 January 2007. Retrieved 16 June 2008.
  19. ^ "Bedford's Italian question". BBC – Legacies. Retrieved 10 February 2008.
  20. ^ "Bedford Italian Community". Bedfordshire Libraries. Archived from the original on 19 January 2008. Retrieved 10 February 2008.
  21. ^ a b "Check Browser Settings".
  22. ^ http://www.opendemocracy.net/uk/matt-kennard/inside-bedford-fragile-success-story-of-muliculturalism-home-of-yarls-wood inside-bedford-fragile-success-story-of-muliculturalism-home-of-yarls-wood
  23. ^ "Brief History of Bedford Town Centre". BedfordBID. Archived from the original on 23 July 2012. Retrieved 24 June 2010.
  24. ^ www.citypopulation.de
  25. ^ 52°08′05″N 0°27′30″W / 52.134654°N 0.458215°W
  26. ^ Daniel Stannard/Bedfordshire County Council (2007). "The First World War Memorial, Bedford" (PDF). Bedfordshire Buildings and Monuments. Archived from the original (PDF) on 27 November 2007. Retrieved 4 November 2007.
  27. ^ "History of the Daily Service". BBC Religion and Ethics. Retrieved 27 July 2017.
  28. ^ "Film Locations".
  29. ^ "Inception to Film at the Airship Shed in Bedfordshire".
  30. ^ "SLIDESHOW: Seal in the River Great Ouse". Bedford Times & Citizen. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  31. ^ "Surprise guest puts seal on festival's pearl". Bedfordshire On Sunday. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  32. ^ "Sunbathing seals make long trip inland from the Wash". BBC Cambridgeshire. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  33. ^ "A New Bus Station for Bedford". Bedford Borough Council. Retrieved 12 September 2017.
  34. ^ "Bus Operators". www.bedford.gov.uk. Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  35. ^ "Two-tier school proposal rejected". BBC News. 13 July 2006. Retrieved 10 February 2008.
  36. ^ "Bedfordshire Progressive Synagogue".
  37. ^ "The Panacea Society". Archived from the original on 22 May 2013. Retrieved 7 January 2013.
  38. ^ "River Great Ouse". Bedford Borough Council. Archived from the original on 6 March 2008. Retrieved 29 January 2008.
  39. ^ "On Your Marks! Bedford Borough to host teams from around the world ahead of London 2012". Archived from the original on 14 July 2012.
  40. ^ "Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em" at Internet Movie Database https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0069634/

External links

Bedford, Massachusetts

Not to be confused with New Bedford, MassachusettsBedford is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. It is within the Greater Boston area, 15 miles (24 km) north-west of the city of Boston. The population of Bedford was 13,320 at the 2010 census.

Bedford, New Hampshire

Bedford is a town in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 21,203 at the 2010 census and an estimated 22,458 in 2017. Bedford is a suburb of Manchester, the largest city in the state of New Hampshire.

Bedford (town), New York

Bedford is a town in Westchester County, New York, USA. The population was 17,335 at the 2010 census.The town of Bedford is located in the northeastern part of Westchester County, and contains the three hamlets of Bedford Hills, Bedford, and Katonah.

Bedford College, London

Bedford College was founded in London in 1849 as the first higher education college for women in the United Kingdom. In 1900, it became a constituent of the University of London. Having played a leading role in the advancement of women in higher education and in public life in general, it became fully coeducational in the 1960s. In 1985, Bedford College merged with Royal Holloway College, another constituent of the University of London, to form Royal Holloway and Bedford New College (RHBNC). This remains the official name, but it is commonly called Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL).

Bedford County, Pennsylvania

Bedford County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 49,762. The county seat is Bedford.

Bedford County, Virginia

Bedford County is a United States county located in the Piedmont region of the Commonwealth of Virginia. Its county seat is the town of Bedford, which was an independent city from 1968 until rejoining the county in 2013.Bedford County was created in 1753 from parts of Lunenburg County, and several changes in alignment were made until the present borders were established in 1786. The county was named in honor of John Russell, an English statesman and fourth Duke of Bedford.

Bedford County is part of the Lynchburg, Virginia Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of the 2010 census, Bedford's population was 68,676. The county population has nearly doubled since 1980.

Bedford School

Bedford School is not to be confused with Bedford Girls' School, Bedford High School, Bedford Modern School or Old Bedford School in Bedford, Texas

Bedford School is an HMC independent school for boys located in the county town of Bedford in England. Founded in 1552, it is the oldest of four independent schools in Bedford run by the Harpur Trust.

Bedford School is composed of the Preparatory School (ages 7 to 13) and the Upper School (ages 13 to 18). There are around 1,100 pupils, of whom approximately a third are boarders. In 2014, James Hodgson succeeded John Moule as Headmaster.

It has produced one Nobel Prize winner, recipients of the Victoria Cross, twenty-four rugby internationals, and the winners of seven Olympic gold medals, educating leading personalities from fields as diverse as politics, academia and the armed forces, cinema, the legal profession and sport.

Bedford Vehicles

Bedford Vehicles, usually shortened to just Bedford, was a brand of vehicle manufactured by Vauxhall Motors, which was ultimately owned by General Motors (GM). Established in April 1931 and constructing commercial vehicles, Bedford Vehicles was a leading international lorry brand, with substantial export sales of light, medium, and heavy lorries throughout the world. It was General Motors Europe's most profitable venture for several years.

Bedford's core heavy trucks business was divested by GM as AWD Trucks in 1987, whilst the Bedford brand continued to be used on light commercial vehicles and car-derived vans based on Vauxhall/Opel, Isuzu and Suzuki designs. The brand was retired in 1991; subsequent GM Europe light commercials were branded as either Vauxhall or Opel, depending on the market.

Bedfordshire

Bedfordshire (; abbreviated Beds.) is a county in the East of England. It is a ceremonial county and a historic county, covered by three unitary authorities: Bedford, Central Bedfordshire, and Luton.

Bedfordshire is bordered by Cambridgeshire to the east and northeast, Northamptonshire to the north, Buckinghamshire to the west and Hertfordshire to the southeast and south. It is the fourteenth most densely populated county of England, with over half the population of the county living in the two largest built-up areas: Luton (236,000) and the county town, Bedford (102,000). The highest elevation point is 243 metres (797 ft) on Dunstable Downs in the Chilterns.

Bedford–Stuyvesant, Brooklyn

Bedford–Stuyvesant (; colloquially known as Bed–Stuy and Bedford-Stuy) is a neighborhood in the north-central portion of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. The neighborhood is part of Brooklyn Community Board 3, with small sections located within Brooklyn Community Board 8 and Brooklyn Community Board 16. The neighborhood is patrolled by the NYPD's 79th and 81st precincts. In the City Council, the district is represented by Robert Cornegy of the 36th Council District.

Bedford–Stuyvesant is bordered by Flushing Avenue to the north (bordering Williamsburg), Classon Avenue to the west (bordering Clinton Hill), Broadway to the east (bordering Bushwick and East New York), and Atlantic Avenue to the south (bordering Crown Heights and Brownsville). It is served by Postal Service ZIP Codes 11205, 11206, 11216, 11221, 11233, and 11238. The main north/south thoroughfare is Nostrand Avenue, but the main shopping street is Fulton Street; the latter lies above the main subway line for the area, on the A and ​C trains. Fulton Street runs east–west the length of the neighborhood and intersects high-traffic streets including Bedford Avenue, Nostrand Avenue, and Stuyvesant Avenue. Bedford–Stuyvesant actually comprises four neighborhoods: Bedford, Stuyvesant Heights, Ocean Hill, and Weeksville (also part of Crown Heights). Part of Clinton Hill was once considered part of Bedford–Stuyvesant.

The neighborhood is a major cultural center for Brooklyn's African American population. Following the construction of the IND Fulton Street Line in 1936, African Americans left an overcrowded Harlem for greater housing availability in Bedford–Stuyvesant. From Bedford–Stuyvesant, African Americans have since moved into the surrounding areas of Brooklyn, such as East New York, Crown Heights, Brownsville, and Fort Greene. Bedford–Stuyvesant has many historic brownstones. These homes were developed for the expanding middle- to upper-middle class from the 1890s to the late 1910s. Many of these homes contain highly ornamental detailing throughout their interiors and have classical architectural elements, such as brackets, quoins, fluting, finials, and elaborate frieze and cornice banding.

Borough of Bedford

Bedford is a unitary authority area with borough status in the ceremonial county of Bedfordshire, England. Its council is based at Bedford, the county town of Bedfordshire. The borough contains one large urban area, the 71st largest in the United Kingdom that comprises Bedford and the adjacent town of Kempston, surrounded by a rural area with many villages. 75% of the borough's population live in the Bedford Urban Area and the five large villages which surround it, which makes up slightly less than 6% of the total land area of the Borough.

The borough is also the location of the Wixams new town development, which received its first residents in 2009.

John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford

John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford KG (20 June 1389 – 14 September 1435) was a medieval English prince, general and statesman who commanded England's armies in France during a critical phase of the Hundred Years' War. Bedford was the third son of King Henry IV of England, brother to Henry V, and acted as regent of France for his nephew Henry VI. Despite his military and administrative talent, the situation in France had severely deteriorated by the time of his death.Bedford was a capable administrator and soldier, and his effective management of the war brought the English to the height of their power in France. However, difficulties mounted after the arrival of Joan of Arc, and his efforts were further thwarted by political divisions at home and the waverings of England's key ally, the duchy of Burgundy. In the last years of Bedford's life, the conflict devolved into a war of attrition, and he became increasingly unable to gather the necessary funds to prosecute the conflict.

Bedford died during the congress of Arras in 1435, just as Burgundy was preparing to abandon the English cause and conclude a separate peace with Charles VII of France.

Macmillan Publishers (United States)

Macmillan Publishers USA was the former name of a now mostly defunct American publishing company. Once the American division of the British Macmillan Publishers, remnants of the original American Macmillan are present in McGraw-Hill Education's Macmillan/McGraw-Hill textbooks and Gale's Macmillan Reference USA division. The German publisher Holtzbrinck, which bought Macmillan UK in 1999, purchased most US rights to the name in 2001 and rebranded its American division with it in 2007.

Nathan Bedford Forrest

Nathan Bedford Forrest (July 13, 1821 – October 29, 1877) was a Confederate Army general and war criminal during the American Civil War.

Before the war, Forrest had amassed substantial wealth as a cotton planter, horse and cattle trader, real estate broker and slave trader. In June 1861, he enlisted in the Confederate Army, one of the few officers during the war to enlist as a private and be promoted general without any military training. An expert cavalry leader, Forrest was given command of a corps and established new doctrines for mobile forces, earning the nickname "The Wizard of the Saddle". His methods influenced many future generations of military strategists, although the Confederate high command is seen to have under-utilized his talents.

In April 1864, in what has been called "one of the bleakest, saddest events of American military history," troops under Forrest's command massacred Union troops who had surrendered, most of them black soldiers, along with some white Southern Tennesseans fighting for the Union, at the Battle of Fort Pillow. Forrest was blamed for the massacre in the Union press, and that news may have strengthened the North's resolve.

Forrest joined the Ku Klux Klan, apparently in 1867, two years after its founding, and was elected its first Grand Wizard. The group was a loose collection of local groups that used violence and the threat of violence to maintain white control over the newly-enfranchised slaves. While Forrest was a Klan leader, during the elections of 1868, the Klan suppressed voting rights of blacks and Republicans in the South through violence and intimidation. In 1869, Forrest expressed disillusionment with the lack of discipline among the various white supremacist groups across the South, and issued a letter ordering the dissolution of the Ku Klux Klan and the destruction of its costumes; he then withdrew from the organization. Lacking coordinated leadership and facing strong opposition from President Grant, this first incarnation of the Klan gradually disappeared. In the last years of his life, Forrest publicly denounced the violence and racism of the Klan, insisted he had never been a member, and made at least one public speech (to a black audience) in favor of racial harmony.

For a time after the war, Forrest operated a prison labor camp where prisoners, primarily black men arrested for "vagrancy" or other similar charges, had their involuntary labor auctioned to private bidders, to the benefit of the buyers and the prison officials.

Although scholars admire Forrest as a military strategist, he has remained a highly controversial figure in Southern history, especially for his role in the attack on Fort Pillow, his 1867–1869 leadership of the Ku Klux Klan, and his political influence as a Tennessee delegate at the 1868 Democratic National Convention.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Bedford County, Pennsylvania

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Bedford County, Pennsylvania.

This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, United States. The locations of National Register properties and districts for which the latitude and longitude coordinates are included below, may be seen in a map.There are 32 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county. Three sites are further designated as National Historic Landmarks. Another 2 properties were once listed but have been removed.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted February 1, 2019.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Bedford County, Virginia

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Bedford County, Virginia.

This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Bedford County, Virginia, United States. The locations of National Register properties and districts for which the latitude and longitude coordinates are included below, may be seen in a Google map.There are 31 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county, including 1 National Historic Landmark.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted February 8, 2019.

National Register of Historic Places listings in New Bedford, Massachusetts

List of Registered Historic Places in New Bedford, Massachusetts.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted February 8, 2019.

New Bedford, Massachusetts

New Bedford is a city in Bristol County, Massachusetts, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city had a total population of 95,072, making it the sixth-largest city in Massachusetts. New Bedford is nicknamed "The Whaling City" because during the 19th century, the city was one of the most important whaling ports in the world, along with Nantucket, Massachusetts and New London, Connecticut. The city, along with Fall River and Taunton, make up the three largest cities in the South Coast region of Massachusetts and is known for its fishing fleet and accompanying seafood producing industries as well as having a high concentration of Luso Americans (Portuguese or from a former Portuguese colony).

Royal Holloway, University of London

Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL), formally incorporated as Royal Holloway and Bedford New College, is a public research university and a constituent college of the federal University of London. It has three faculties, 20 academic departments and c. 9,200 undergraduate and postgraduate students from over 100 countries. The campus is located west of Egham, Surrey, 19 miles (31 km) from central London.

The Egham campus was founded in 1879 by the Victorian entrepreneur and philanthropist Thomas Holloway. Royal Holloway College was officially opened in 1886 by Queen Victoria as an all-women college. It became a member of the University of London in 1900. In 1945, the college admitted male postgraduate students, and in 1965, around 100 of the first male undergraduates. In 1985, Royal Holloway merged with Bedford College (another former all-women's college in London). The merged college was named Royal Holloway and Bedford New College (RHBNC), this remaining the official registered name of the college by Act of Parliament. The campus is dominated by the Founder's Building, a Grade I listed red-brick building modelled on the Château de Chambord in the Loire Valley, France. The annual income of the institution for 2017–18 was £173.6 million of which £13.9 million was from research grants and contracts, with an expenditure of £169.4 million.Royal Holloway is ranked joint 34th in the UK and is in the 251st-300th bracket in the world by the Times Higher Education World University Rankings for 2019.There are strong links and exchange programmes with institutions in the United States, Canada, and Hong Kong, notably Yale University, the University of Toronto, and the University of Hong Kong. Royal Holloway was a member of the 1994 Group until 2013, when the group dissolved.

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