Bears–Packers rivalry

The Bears–Packers rivalry is a National Football League (NFL) rivalry between the Chicago Bears and the Green Bay Packers. The two clubs have won a combined 22 NFL championships (13 for Green Bay and 9 for Chicago), including 5 Super Bowl championships (4 for Green Bay and 1 for Chicago) and have 65 members in the Pro Football Hall of Fame (Chicago with 34 and Green Bay with 31).

The rivalry began in 1921 and is the league's most played, with 197 regular-season and post-season games.[1] The rivalry is not the league's longest continuous rivalry, as the 1982 strike-shortened NFL season did not include a Bears–Packers game. That title goes to the rivalry between the Lions and the Packers, who have played each other at least twice a year since 1932. The Packers and Bears have played in the same conference or division since the NFL went to a conference format in 1933; they played in the NFL's Western Conference from 1933 to 1970, and have been in the NFC North since 1970 (known as the NFC Central from 1970 to 2001). As such, they usually play each other twice every regular season.

The Packers surpassed the Bears in the overall series in 2017 for the first time since 1932 and now lead, 97–95–6. The Bears had previously led the series by as many as 24 games both in 1960 and in 1992.

Chicago Bears wordmark
Chicago Bears
Green Bay Packers wordmark
Green Bay Packers
Green Bay Packers wordmark

Notable games and moments

1920s–1950s

  • Bears 20, Packers 0 (November 27, 1921) – The two organizations played for the first time in 1921 at Chicago, when the Bears were nicknamed the Chicago Staleys. Bears' Gaylord "Pete" Stinchcomb scored the game's first touchdown on a 45-yard run. The Bears shut out the Packers 20–0 in their first meeting, and the rivalry was born. A year later, the Staleys changed their team name to the Bears.
  • Bears 3, Packers 0 (November 23, 1924) – The Bears–Packers rivalry can be credited for the first ever ejection of players for fighting during an NFL game. The Bears' Frank Hanny and Packers' Tillie Voss were ejected before the end of the first half as verbal exchanges led to punches being thrown. Two years later, Hanny was ejected once again in a game versus Green Bay.[2]
  • Packers 7, Bears 0 (September 28, 1930) – The Packers shut out the Bears for the fifth consecutive game in this contest which is the longest such streak in the series. The streak began in 1928 when the Packers defeated the Bears 6–0 on December 9 of that season.[3] In 1929, the Packers shut out the Bears three times, 23–0, 14–0, and 25–0 en route to their first NFL championship.[4][5] On November 9, the Bears finally scored on the Packers although they came up short in the final score 13–12.[6] The Packers then went on to win their second consecutive NFL title that season.[7]
  • Packers 16, Bears 14 (November 2, 1941) – The Bears came into the game undefeated and seemingly invincible. Over their first five games, they defeated their rivals by an unprecedented 157 points.[8] However, the Packers upset them in this game which was the Bears lone defeat that season. The Associated Press wrote of the game that the "Chicago Bears myth is broken".[9] Chicago fans made accusations that the game had been fixed,[10] and it was suggested that the Packers had employed a "secret" defensive scheme.[11] The Packers had built a 16–0 lead through the first three quarters of play before the Bears mounted a comeback in the fourth quarter coming up just short of a win.[12]
  • Bears 33, Packers 14 (December 14, 1941) – In the first playoff meeting between the two rivals, the Bears defeated the Packers 33–14 in a one-game-playoff to determine the Western Division championship. After the Packers, the Bears defeated the New York Giants en route to their fourth NFL Championship. Until the 2010 post-season, this remained the only playoff meeting between the teams.
  • Bears 52, Packers 31 (November 6, 1955) – The Bears and Packers played the highest-scoring game of their series at Soldier Field in the 1955 season. The Bears created a huge 45–3 lead, but the Packers were able to score 28 points in the fourth quarter; by the game's end, the Bears beat the Packers 52–31, with the two teams combining for 83 points. This was also the last game that George Halas coached the Bears in against the Packers until 1958 due to a temporary break from coaching.

1960s–1970s

  • Packers 31, Bears 28 (November 12, 1961) – The Packers built up an impressive 31–7 lead in the game, but the Bears made a furious comeback with three unanswered touchdowns to make the score 31–28. Still, the Packers were able to win the game; they would go on to win the NFL Championship that year against the New York Giants.
  • Packers 49, Bears 0 (September 30, 1962) – Vince Lombardi's Packers shutout George Halas' Bears, 49–0 at City Stadium, the Packers largest margin of victory in the rivalry. The team repeated that score against the Philadelphia Eagles six weeks later on Nov 11, 1962. The games remain a Packers team record for most points in a shutout victory. After again defeating the Bears later in the season, this time by a score of 38–7, the Packers won their 8th NFL championship. Motivated by the two humiliating losses to the Packers, Halas spent the off-season focusing on beating the Packers.
  • Bears 26, Packers 7 (November 17, 1963) – The Bears and Packers, both with 8–1 records, met at Wrigley Field to play for first place in the Western Conference. Chicago, behind a dominant defense, got a 26–0 lead and held on to win 26–7, completing a sweep of the Packers in the 1963 season and handling Green Bay only two losses of the season. The Bears finished the season with an NFL championship victory over the New York Giants once again, claiming their 8th NFL Championship.
  • Packers 23, Bears 12 (September 13, 1964) – Remembered as the "Free Kick Game" because the Packers invoked the surprising "Fair catch kick rule", which allows for a place or drop kick field goal attempt from the spot of a fair catch. Elijah Pitts fair caught a Bears punt on the Bears' 48-yard-line just before the end of the first half. Packers' coach Vince Lombardi opted to attempt a free kick. Confusion ensued as neither team had ever so much as even practiced a free kick. The Packers lined up at the line of scrimmage with Bart Starr holding for Paul Hornung. Hornung made the 52-yard field goal as the first half ended. The Packers stunned all in attendance with the kick, and won the game 23–12.
  • Bears 13, Packers 10 (November 3, 1968) – The Bears got their revenge on the Packers, beating them 13–10 on a fair catch free kick by Mac Percival at the 43-yard line after a Packers punt with :26 left in the game. Percival kicked a game-winner the week before against the Minnesota Vikings.[13]
  • Bears 2, Packers 0 (August 7, 1971) – Although it was only an exhibition — Dan Devine's first as head coach of the Packers – it will long be remembered as an exercise in futility. The Bears won when 6-foot-7 quarterback Frank Patrick of the Packers, who had been drafted as a tight end the year before and miscast as a quarterback, faded back to pass in the third quarter beyond the end line at Milwaukee's County Stadium for a safety and the only score of the game.

1980s

  • Packers 12, Bears 6 (September 7, 1980) – With the score tied 6–6 and the game in overtime, Packers kicker Chester Marcol was called in to attempt a game-winning field goal. The Bears' Alan Page managed to break through and block the field goal, with the football hitting his helmet. The ball rebounded to Marcol, and, carrying the ball, he crossed the goal line to score the winning touchdown for the Packers.
  • Bears 61, Packers 7[14] (December 7, 1980) – In the game, the Bears scored eight offensive touchdowns. After the Packers had suffered the second-most lopsided defeat in their history, Bart Starr charged across the field to confront Bears coach Neill Armstrong. Starr was upset because Bears defensive coordinator Buddy Ryan had the Bears blitzing from all angles in the fourth quarter, even after the Packers inserted backup quarterback David Whitehurst with the score 48–7.[15] "Bart Starr was upset," Armstrong said after the game. "He did the talking and I did the listening. He said he'd rather not hear what I had to say, something to that effect, and he left." Two years later, Bill Tobin, the Bears' vice president of player personnel at the time, revealed that he had been instructed by general manager Jim Finks during the off-season to study film and decode the Packers' signal system for relaying plays to the quarterback. Tobin, who had been in the Packers' front office during the Devine years, had been fired by Starr in 1975 as part of a wholesale housecleaning. "I went at it like a tiger does good meat," Tobin said at the time. "We wanted 100 points," defensive end Dan Hampton said. "It couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of pricks."
  • Bears 23, Packers 7 (October 21, 1985) – The world was introduced to rookie defensive lineman William "The Refrigerator" Perry on Monday Night Football.[16] In goal line situations, Bears head coach Mike Ditka used Perry, who weighed roughly 300 lbs. in the fullback position. Twice, Perry led the way for Bears legend Walter Payton on two- and one-yard touchdown runs. In the second quarter, "the Fridge" was given the ball and plunged into the end zone for one of the heaviest touchdowns in NFL history. The Bears won 23–7, and "The Fridge" was born.
  • Bears 16, Packers 10 (November 10, 1985) – Before the game, the Packers placed horse manure in the Bears locker room.[16] Two weeks after the Monday Night Game, tempers reached a boiling point in the rivalry. Packers cornerback Mark Lee was ejected after he and Bears running back Walter Payton went flying over a bench in the first quarter.[17] A few minutes later, Packers safety Ken Stills was flagged for leveling Matt Suhey, Payton's backfield mate, well after the whistle.
  • Bears 12, Packers 10 (November 23, 1986) – In Week 12 of the 1986 season Green Bay defensive tackle Charles Martin wore a towel with a hit list of specific Bears numbers written on it, such as No. 34 Walter Payton, No. 9 Jim McMahon, and others.[18] Following a McMahon interception Martin came up from behind and body slammed him to the turf,[17] separating McMahon's shoulder, ending the quarterback's season. Martin was suspended for two games, at the time the longest suspension in NFL history.[19]
  • Packers 14, Bears 13 (November 6, 1989) – This became known as the "Instant Replay Game".[20] Packers quarterback Don Majkowski led the Packers to a comeback with an apparent game-winning touchdown pass to wide receiver Sterling Sharpe. The play was called a touchdown, but line judge Jim Quirk had called a penalty on Majkowski for being beyond the line of scrimmage when he threw the pass. A nervous and tense crowd at Lambeau Field waited as the call went up to the instant replay official. Several minutes later, the call came down and the touchdown was awarded as recorded by instant replay, providing the Packers their first victory over the Bears since 1984. This led to a change in the "illegal forward pass" rule which defined when to consider a passer past the line of scrimmage. The rule used to be judged by the position of the ball instead of the passer's feet. Bears coach Mike Ditka ordered that an asterisk be placed next to the result in all team publications.

1990s

  • Packers 33, Bears 6 (October 31, 1994) – Playing with a severely bruised hip in a driving rainstorm at Soldier Field on Halloween Night, Brett Favre rushes for a career-high 58 yards – including a 36-yard touchdown in the second quarter when he leaped over a Bears defender.[21] After the game Favre said "Maybe Gale Sayers (who had his number retired that night along with Dick Butkus) got excited about that one".[22] With a win in that game, Green Bay began a ten-game winning streak against the Bears as Favre was considered a "Bear-killer"[23] by members of the Chicago Bears media and fans alike.[24] This game marked the beginning of two streaks in the series. The Packers won ten consecutive games in the series (the longest between the two clubs) and also eleven consecutive away games – a streak that did not end until the 2005 season.[25] Throwback uniforms were worn by both teams.
  • Packers 27, Bears 24 (September 11, 1995) – Brett Favre throws a 99-yard touchdown pass to Robert Brooks – one of only 13 times in NFL history a 99-yard TD pass has ever been completed.[21] Green Bay stormed to a 27–7 lead and had 431 yards on offense compared to Chicago's 243, Although Chicago scored 17 unanswered at the end, they came up just short as time expired. The game was featured nationally on Monday Night Football.[26]
  • Packers 35, Bears 28 (November 12, 1995) – Coming into this much-anticipated matchup, first place in the NFC Central division was on the line. A victory would give the Packers the same record as the Bears (6–4) and would mean a series sweep, giving Green Bay the head-to-head tie-breaker should the teams be tied at season's end. Brett Favre had a badly sprained ankle, which kept his status for the game uncertain. He had not been able to practice all week until the Friday prior to the game. Not only did Favre start, but he had his best game of the season up to that point. He completed 25 of 33 passes for 336 yards and a career-high five touchdowns. Bears QB Erik Kramer also had a solid game, going 23 of 38 for 318 yards, two touchdowns, and one interception. The teams combined for 800 yards of offense. The game was not decided until Kramer threw an incomplete pass in the Packers' end zone on the final play of the game.[27]
  • Packers 24, Bears 23 (October 12, 1997) – In one of the more back-and-forth contests in the rivalry, the Bears got off to a 10–0 lead thanks in part to a rushing touchdown by Raymont Harris in the first quarter before the Packers came back to take a 14–10 halftime lead due to a rushing score by Dorsey Levens. In the third quarter, Erik Kramer ran for a three-yard touchdown to put the Bears back in front, 17–14. However, in the waning seconds of the third quarter, Brett Favre connected with Mark Chmura for a touchdown. The Packers led, 21–17, then extended their lead to 24–17. The Bears marched down the field and scored when Kramer connected with Chris Penn with less than two minutes left. In an "all-or-nothing" maneuver, the Bears went for a two-point conversion. The pass fell incomplete, essentially preserving the win for the Packers.[28]
  • Bears 14, Packers 13 (November 7, 1999) – In their first game since the passing of running back Walter Payton, the Bears defeated the Packers for the first time since 1993 on a blocked field goal by defensive tackle Bryan Robinson. This game was also the game where Brett Favre surpassed Ron Jaworski's record for most consecutive starts by a quarterback.

2000s

  • Packers 34, Bears 21 (October 7, 2002) – This Monday night contest at Memorial Stadium in Champaign, Illinois, was the only Bears home game in the entire series that was played outside of Chicago. Brett Favre threw an 85-yard TD pass to Driver in the first quarter—the second longest of his career to that point (both against the Bears). At the time, Soldier Field was undergoing a major renovation; the renovated stadium would later reopen in 2003 between the Bears and Packers.[29]
  • Bears 26, Packers 0 (September 10, 2006) – In the opening week of the season, the Bears handed Brett Favre his first shutout in his 16-year career, winning 26–0 in Green Bay. The Bears' offense, criticized for being conservative, opened the game with a 49-yard touchdown pass from Rex Grossman to Bernard Berrian. This also marked the first game in which the Bears' Devin Hester returned a punt for a touchdown.[30]
  • Bears 20, Packers 17 (December 22, 2008) – The coldest game in recorded Bears history featured a temperature at kickoff of 2 degrees and −13 degrees with wind chill. The Packers traveled to Soldier Field on a Monday night, where a victory against the Bears would have ended their playoff hopes. The Bears had to rally from a 14–3 score at the half. The Bears were able to score after a turnover on a Packers punt return. The Packers were on the verge of finishing a game-winning drive when Mason Crosby's field goal attempt was blocked by Alex Brown, pushing the game to overtime. The Bears took the first possession in overtime and won the game on a 38-yard field goal by Robbie Gould.

2010s

  • Bears 20, Packers 17 (September 27, 2010) – The 2–0 Packers traveled to Chicago for an early season showdown with the 2–0 Bears for the NFC North lead. The Bears wore throwback 1940s jerseys to honor the Monsters of the Midway. They also honored former Bear George Blanda, who died Monday, with a moment of silence before the game.[31] Aaron Rodgers threw a 7-yard touchdown pass to Greg Jennings to open the scoring in the first quarter. Mason Crosby made it 10–0 with 4:45 left in the second quarter, but Jay Cutler drove the Bears down and connected with Greg Olsen for a touchdown with 31 seconds left. Late in the 3rd quarter, Julius Peppers blocked a 37-yard field goal attempt by Mason Crosby to keep it 10–7 Packers. Devin Hester then opened the 4th quarter with a 62-yard punt return for a touchdown to make it 14–10 Bears. It was the 12th time Hester had returned a kickoff or punt for a touchdown and the first since Dec. 30, 2007. Aaron Rodgers led the Packers on a drive that resulted in him getting into the end zone on a 3-yard scamper to make it 17–14. However, the Packers were left to regret a sloppy performance, as they recorded a team record 18 penalties. The Bears took advantage, with Robbie Gould kicking a field goal with 4:03 left and then 0:08 left to claim a 20–17 victory.
  • Packers 10, Bears 3 (January 3, 2011) – The 9–6 Packers hosted the 11–4 Bears in a must-win game in order to enter the playoffs. The Bears had the main goal of keeping their archrival out of the playoffs. With both teams coming off of high scoring victories (the Packers beat the Giants 45–17 and the Bears beat the Jets 38–34), a shoot-out was anticipated. However, the frozen tundra yielded a defensive battle. The first quarter was scoreless. In the second quarter, Robbie Gould kicked a 30-yard field goal to make it 3–0 Bears. It wasn't until late in the 3rd quarter that Mason Crosby kicked a 23-yard field goal to make it 3–3. With 2:50 left in the 4th quarter though, Aaron Rodgers hit tight end Lee for a 1-yard touchdown pass to make it 10–3. Jay Cutler was 21 of 39 for 168 yards, no touchdowns and 2 interceptions. Aaron Rodgers was 19 of 28 for 229 yards, with one touchdown and no interceptions. Erik Walden had a superb game for the Packers. The linebacker registered 11 tackles and 3 sacks.[32]
  • Packers 21, Bears 14 (January 23, 2011, NFC Championship Game) – This was the first time the two teams had met in the playoffs since 1941. The Green Bay Packers started off strong with an early 14–0 lead on an Aaron Rodgers rushing TD. Bears' quarterback, Jay Cutler, was injured late in the second quarter, and was unable to continue. After Bears' quarterback Todd Collins proved ineffective, going 0 for 4 on two drives, the Bears brought in Caleb Hanie, who led them to a 1-yard touchdown run by Chester Taylor to make it 14–7. On the very next Bears drive, however, Hanie would be intercepted by B. J. Raji, who took it to the endzone to make it 21–7 late in the game. The Bears would answer with another TD. With one more drive to tie the game, Hanie threw his second interception, this time to Sam Shields to end the game and send Green Bay to the Super Bowl.[33] The Packers went on to win Super Bowl XLV over the Pittsburgh Steelers, becoming the NFC's first sixth-seeded team (and second wild card team) to win the Super Bowl.[34]
  • Bears 27, Packers 20 (November 4, 2013) – Heading into this Monday Night match-up at Lambeau Field, Bears' quarterback Jay Cutler was sidelined with a groin injury. Thus, Josh McCown, the backup quarterback of the Bears who had played in Lambeau against the Packers on Christmas Day in 2011, played in Cutler's stead. In the first drive of the game, Packers' quarterback Aaron Rodgers was sacked by Shea McClellin, which fractured Rodgers' left collarbone and sent him out of the game. McCown threw for 272 yards and two touchdowns, and no interceptions. Seneca Wallace, the backup quarterback for the Packers, threw for 114 yards and no touchdowns, with one interception. The Bears won the game 27–20 to end a six-game skid to the Packers and beat them for the first time in Lambeau Field since 2007. Aaron Rodgers would be out for 7 weeks, eventually returning in Week 17 against the Bears for the NFC North title.
  • Packers 33, Bears 28 (December 29, 2013) – In a game with the NFC North Championship and the No. 4 seed in the playoffs on the line, the Packers faced off against the Bears with quarterback Aaron Rodgers in his first start since their last meeting in early November, the game in which he was injured. The game was notable for a Rodgers fumble to touchdown that occurred when most players from both teams believed the play to be an incomplete pass. The game also showcased an offensive shootout in the second half, including Bears quarterback Jay Cutler throwing for two touchdowns. However, the Packers ended their last drive converting on 4th down three times, most notably in a long 4th and 8 completion to Randall Cobb for a touchdown that would win the game and deliver Green Bay its 3rd consecutive NFC North title. The loss meant the Bears missed the playoffs for a third straight year, while the Packers made their fifth consecutive trip to the playoffs.
  • Packers 55, Bears 14 (November 6, 2014) – Aaron Rodgers tied an NFL record with 6 touchdown passes in the first half in a blowout win for the Packers, the most lopsided win over the Bears for the Packers since 1962 and their highest point total in a game since 1945. The Packers scored more points in this game than in any other in the rivalry. Bears' kickoff returner Chris Williams tied an NFL record with 10 kickoff returns in a game, one of which went for a 101-yard touchdown.
  • Bears 17, Packers 13 (November 26, 2015) – On the night of Brett Favre's jersey retirement, the Bears met the Packers at Lambeau Field for a Thanksgiving match-up. With a 4–6 record and having lost to the Packers earlier in the year, Chicago entered the game as huge underdogs. While the Bears' offense stalled in the first quarter, the Packers took a 7-point lead on a touchdown pass from Aaron Rodgers to Eddie Lacy. In the second quarter, the Bears scored two touchdowns, while the Packers settled for two field goals, making the score 14–13 at halftime. The Bears scored one more field goal in the fourth quarter while their defense pitched a second half shutout, including a goal line stand in the game's final seconds. The game marked the first and only win for Jay Cutler as a Bears quarterback in Lambeau Field, as well as his first win against the Packers since 2010.
  • Packers 30, Bears 27 (December 18, 2016) – With Green Bay one game down in the all time head to head series, and needing a win to move within a game of the division lead, the Packers entered Soldier Field during one of the coldest Chicago Bears games on record. With both teams tied at halftime 10–10, Green Bay surged to a 27–10 advantage in the third quarter, before the Bears made a run of their own in the fourth quarter to bring them within 3 points, and in striking distance of the Green Bay end zone. Green Bay held the Bears to a field goal after a goal-line stand. During the Packers' ensuing possession, quarterback Aaron Rodgers completed a 60-yard pass to Jordy Nelson which led to a Packers field goal as time expired.
  • Packers 35, Bears 14 (September 28, 2017) – The Packers took advantage of two early Bear turnovers, scoring two early touchdowns within 1 minute of game time in the first quarter. After a 47-minute delay due to lightning in the 2nd quarter, the Packers continued their dominance of the Bears, causing four total Bear turnovers and Aaron Rodgers throwing 4 touchdown passes in a 35–14 win. The win gave the Packers a 95–94–6 edge in the overall rivalry, the first time the Packers had the winning advantage in the rivalry since 1933. The game included a vicious helmet-to-helmet hit from Bears' Danny Trevathan on Packers' Davante Adams, which knocked Adams out and caused a small skirmish between the Bears and Packers players. Trevathan received a two-game suspension that was later reduced to one game after an appeal.
  • Packers 23, Bears 16 (November 12, 2017) – On a gray and rainy day at Soldier Field, the Green Bay Packers came to town without Aaron Rodgers, who had suffered a broken collarbone several weeks earlier. Thus, this was the first game in the rivalry since 1991 that didn't have Rodgers or Brett Favre at the starting quarterback position. Led by back-up quarterback Brett Hundley, the Packers struck first with an 11 play, 70 yard drive, and a 40-yard field goal by Mason Crosby. The Bears answered with an 8 play, 53 yard drive, capped by a 45-yard Connor Barth field goal. In the second quarter, the Packers made it 10–3 when Ty Montgomery burst up the middle on a 37-yard run. With 8:09 left in the first half, Bears quarterback Mitchell Trubisky hit Benny Cunningham on a short screen pass that he turned upfield for 23 yards. Cunningham tried to score on the play but was ruled out of bounds at the 2-yard line. However, John Fox opted to challenge, believing it was a touchdown. Instead, officials said Cunningham lost control of the football before it made contact with the pylon, and referee Tony Corrente ruled the play a touchback and awarded the ball to Green Bay at the 20-yard line.[35] Later on, Conor Barth made a 44-yard field goal to end the half at 10–6. In the third quarter, Mason Crosby hit a 40-yard field in the third quarter to make it 13–6 and added another 50 yarder at the beginning of the 4th quarter to make it 16–6. With 10:39 to go in the game, Mitchell Trubisky answered with a 46-yard pass to Josh Bellamy to make it 16–13. However, the Packers responded with an 8 play, 75 yard drive, capped by a 19-yard touchdown pass to Davante Adams to make it 23–13. The Bears hit another field goal through Conor Barth to make it 23–16. Despite a botched field goal by the Packers that would have iced the game, the Bears were stopped on fourth down to end the game.[36]
  • Packers 24, Bears 23 (September 9, 2018) – After an offseason in which both teams made massive player acquisitions and had notable drafts, most notably the Bears having acquired linebacker Khalil Mack, the two teams met on Sunday Night Football for a much anticipated matchup. In the first half, after Green Bay went three and out to open the game, the Bears struck first with a 2-yard touchdown run by quarterback Mitchell Trubisky. After the two teams exchanged three and outs, Chicago ended the 1st quarter up 7–0. The Bears would later add to the lead with a Cody Parkey field goal to make it 10–0. Late in the second quarter, defensive lineman Roy Robertson-Harris knocked Aaron Rodgers out with a knee injury and the Bears capitalized with Mack getting a pick-six off Packers backup DeShone Kizer. Rodgers would return to the game in third quarter down 20–0 after another Cody Parkey field goal, and led the Packers on a scoring drive culminating in a Mason Crosby field goal to end the third quarter with the Bears leading 20–3. However, a complete defensive meltdown by Chicago in the fourth quarter led the Packers going on a 21–3 scoring run off three Rodgers touchdown passes, one being a 75-yarder to Randall Cobb to take a 24–23 lead with just over 2 minutes left. After Chicago got the ball back, a roughing the passer penalty on Clay Matthews on fourth down gave the Bears a fresh set of downs. However, they would turn it over on a Trubisky fumble recovered by the Packers' Nick Perry. The 17-point fourth-quarter comeback for the Packers represented their largest in franchise history. Green Bay increased their lead in the overall series against Chicago to three, their largest lead ever in the rivalry’s history.
  • Bears 24, Packers 17 (December 16, 2018) – The Bears looked to avenge the season opening loss in a showdown on a clear, but chilly day at Soldier Field. Surprisingly, each team's fortunes had diverged onto different paths since week 1: the Packers, at 5–7–1, had to win to have any chance of remaining in playoff contention, while the 9–4 Bears needed a win to secure their first NFC North Division Title since 2010. The Packers entered the game missing several key starters, including DTs Mike Daniels and Kenny Clark, CB Kevin King and RT Bryan Bulaga. The Bears listed Allen Robinson and Eddie Jackson as questionable, but both played. The Packers lost starting RB Aaron Jones in the first quarter to a knee injury. Jordan Howard tallied the only score of the 1st quarter, rumbling 9 yards through a gaping hole on the Packers defensive front to make it 7–0 with 2:08 to go. In the second quarter, after a 9 play, 38 yard drive, Mason Crosby made it 7–3. However, Tarik Cohen took a 12 yard pass to cap a 5 play, 61 yard drive and make it 14–3 with 30 seconds to play before the half. In the third quarter, Crosby again hit a 43 yard kick to cap an 11 play, 50 yard drive and make it 14–6. Then on fourth down, the Bears called a fake punt at midfield that the Packers stuffed. Aaron Rodgers then drove the Packers down 50 yards in 5 plays, where Jamaal Williams raced in from 10 yards out to make it 14–12. Rodgers then hit Davante Adams for the two point conversion and make it 14–14. In the fourth quarter, the Bears took control. Mitch Trubisky hit Trey Burton for a 13 yard touchdown pass to make it 21–14 with 10:16 to go. Cody Parkey added to the lead with a 24 yard field goal with 6:43 to go. Eddie Jackson broke Rodgers' consecutive record of 401 pass attempts without an interception by picking him off in the end zone. The Packers drove again, only to settle for a field goal to make it 24–17 with 11 seconds to go, in order to attempt an onside kick and get the ball back. However, the Bears recovered and the game ended. Rodgers finished 25 of 42 for 274 yards, no TDs and one interception. He was sacked five times. Trubisky finished 20 of 28 for 235 yards, 2 TDs and no interceptions. He was sacked once. This game would end the Packers' eight-game winning streak at Soldier Field, give the Bears their first NFC North title since 2010, eliminate the Packers from playoff contention for the second straight year, and mark the second consecutive losing season for the Packers, the first time the team had consecutive losing seasons since 1990–1991. [37]

Playoffs

The Bears and Packers have made it to the playoffs in the same year only four times.

  • 1941 The Bears would go on to win the championship early on in the rivalry. This was also the only playoff game in which the two teams had played against each other until the NFC Championship game of the 2010 season.
  • 1994 Both teams won first-round games only to be knocked out in the second-round games, seeing the 49ers go on to win the Super Bowl.
  • 2001 The Bears had a first round bye but the Packers were the only one of the two teams to win a playoff game this year. The Packers had also given the Bears 2 of their 3 regular season losses that season. The Bears were knocked out at home by the Philadelphia Eagles while the Packers lost to the eventual Super Bowl runner-up St. Louis Rams.
  • 2010 The two teams met on the last day of the season in what was a must-win for Green Bay. The Packers won 10–3 to capture the last wild card spot as the sixth seed, while the Bears had already secured a first-round bye as the second seed. Green Bay clinched a trip to the NFC Championship by virtue of a 21–16 win over third-seeded Philadelphia in the Wild Card round and then defeating top-seeded Atlanta, 48–21, in a divisional playoff. The Bears defeated fourth-seeded Seattle in the other divisional playoff, 35–24. Both teams advanced to the NFC Championship game, only their second playoff game against each other. Many fans of both teams describe the game as the biggest in the history of the rivalry, with a trip to the Super Bowl on the line. The Packers would ultimately prevail 21–14[33] and go on to beat the Pittsburgh Steelers in Super Bowl XLV.[34]

Statistics and records

As of December 16, 2018, there have been 198 games between the two teams—most in NFL history—since their first league game in 1921, of which Green Bay has won 97 games, Chicago 95 and there have been 6 ties.[38][39] The largest margin of victory was a 61–7 Bears win on December 7, 1980. The longest winning streak is held by the Packers at 10 games from 1994–1998. After beating the Bears four times in 2011, the Packers became only the second team in NFL history to defeat the same opponent four times in one calendar year (the Los Angeles Raiders defeated the Denver Broncos four times in 1994).[40]

Club success

As of 2018, the Bears and Packers have won a combined 22 championships in the league's history.

Team NFL Titles[41] Conference Titles Divisional Titles[42] Wild Card Berths Playoff Appearances NFL Title Game Appearances[43] Super Bowl Appearances[44] All-time Record
Chicago Bears 9 4 19 4 27[45] 8 2 778–601–42
Green Bay Packers 13 9 18 7 32 11 5 775–590–37
Combined 22 13 37 11 59 19 7 1553–1191–79
Table correct through Week 17 of the 2018 season.

Summary of results

Bears wins Ties Packers wins Bears points Packers points
Regular season 94 6 96 3,361 3,399
Postseason 1 1 47 35
Total 95 6 97 3,408 3,434

Updated December 16, 2018.

Game results

The following is a list of results from all of the meetings between the Chicago Bears and Green Bay Packers, from their first meeting on November 27, 1921, to the present:

Bears Victory Packers victory Tied Game Post Season Meeting

1920s (Bears 7–6–3)

Year Date Winner Result Loser Attendance Location Series Record
1921 Sunday, November 27 Chicago Staleys 20–0 Green Bay Packers 7,000 Chicago Bears 1–0
1923 Sunday, October 14 Chicago Bears 3–0 Green Bay Packers 4,451 Green Bay Bears 2–0
1924 Sunday, November 23 Chicago Bears 3–0 Green Bay Packers 6,000 Chicago Bears 3–0
1925 Sunday, September 27 Green Bay Packers 14–10 Chicago Bears 5,389 Green Bay Bears 3–1
1925 Sunday, November 22 Chicago Bears 21–0 Green Bay Packers 6,898 Chicago Bears 4–1
1926 Sunday, September 26 6–6 7,000 Green Bay Bears 4–1–1
1926 Sunday, November 21 Chicago Bears 19–13 Green Bay Packers 7,500 Chicago Bears 5–1–1
1926 Sunday, December 19 3–3 10,000 Chicago Bears 5–1–2
1927 Sunday, October 2 Chicago Bears 7–6 Green Bay Packers 5,500 Green Bay Bears 6–1–2
1927 Sunday, November 20 Chicago Bears 14–6 Green Bay Packers 6,000 Chicago Bears 7–1–2
1928 Sunday, September 30 12–12 8,500 Green Bay Bears 7–1–3
1928 Sunday, October 21 Green Bay Packers 16–6 Chicago Bears 15,000 Chicago Bears 7–2–3
1928 Sunday, December 9 Green Bay Packers 6–0 Chicago Bears 14,000 Chicago Bears 7–3–3
1929 Sunday, September 29 Green Bay Packers 23–0 Chicago Bears 13,000 Green Bay Bears 7–4–3
1929 Sunday, November 10 Green Bay Packers 14–0 Chicago Bears 13,000 Chicago Bears 7–5–3
1929 Sunday, December 8 Green Bay Packers 25–0 Chicago Bears 6,000 Chicago Bears 7–6–3
  • Packers outscore Bears 144–124

1930s (Bears 12–11–1)

Year Date Winner Result Loser Attendance Location Series Record
1930 Sunday, September 28 Green Bay Packers 7–0 Chicago Bears 10,000 Green Bay Tied 7–7–3
1930 Sunday, November 9 Green Bay Packers 13–12 Chicago Bears 22,000 Chicago Packers 8–7–3
1930 Sunday, December 7 Chicago Bears 21–0 Green Bay Packers 20,000 Chicago Tied 8–8–3
1931 Sunday, September 27 Green Bay Packers 7–0 Chicago Bears 13,500 Green Bay Packers 9–8–3
1931 Sunday, November 1 Green Bay Packers 6–2 Chicago Bears 30,000 Chicago Packers 10–8–3
1931 Sunday, December 6 Chicago Bears 7–6 Green Bay Packers 18,000 Chicago Packers 10–9–3
1932 Sunday, September 25 0–0 13,000 Green Bay Packers 10–9–4
1932 Sunday, October 16 Green Bay Packers 2–0 Chicago Bears 18,000 Chicago Packers 11–9–4
1932 Sunday, December 11 Chicago Bears 9–0 Green Bay Packers 5,000 Chicago Packers 11–10–4
1933 Sunday, September 24 Chicago Bears 14–7 Green Bay Packers 12,000 Green Bay Tied 11–11–4
1933 Sunday, October 22 Chicago Bears 10–7 Green Bay Packers 21,000 Chicago Bears 12–11–4
1933 Sunday, December 10 Chicago Bears 7–6 Green Bay Packers 7,000 Chicago Bears 13–11–4
1934 Sunday, September 23 Chicago Bears 24–10 Green Bay Packers 13,500 Green Bay Bears 14–11–4
1934 Sunday, October 28 Chicago Bears 27–14 Green Bay Packers 18,000 Chicago Bears 15–11–4
1935 Sunday, September 22 Green Bay Packers 7–0 Chicago Bears 13,600 Green Bay Bears 15–12–4
1935 Sunday, October 27 Green Bay Packers 17–14 Chicago Bears 29,386 Chicago Bears 15–13–4
1936 Sunday, September 20 Chicago Bears 30–3 Green Bay Packers 14,312 Green Bay Bears 16–13–4
1936 Sunday, November 1 Green Bay Packers 21–10 Chicago Bears 31,346 Chicago Bears 16–14–4
1937 Sunday, September 19 Chicago Bears 14–2 Green Bay Packers 16,658 Green Bay Bears 17–14–4
1937 Sunday, November 7 Green Bay Packers 24–14 Chicago Bears 44,977 Chicago Bears 17–15–4
1938 Sunday, September 18

Chicago Bears

2–0 Green Bay Packers 15,172 Green Bay Bears 18–15–4
1938 Sunday, November 6 Green Bay Packers 24–17 Chicago Bears 40,208 Chicago Bears 18–16–4
1939 Sunday, September 24 Green Bay Packers 21–16 Chicago Bears 19,192 Green Bay Bears 18–17–4
1939 Sunday, November 5 Chicago Bears 30–27 Green Bay Packers 40,537 Chicago Bears 19–17–4
  • Bears outscore Packers 280–231

1940s (Bears 16–4–1)

Year Date Winner Result Loser Attendance Location Series Record
1940 Sunday, September 22 Chicago Bears 41–10 Green Bay Packers 22,557 Green Bay Bears 20–17–4
1940 Sunday, November 3 Chicago Bears 14–7 Green Bay Packers 45,434 Chicago Bears 21–17–4
1941 Sunday, September 28 Chicago Bears 25–17 Green Bay Packers 24,876 Green Bay Bears 22–17–4
1941 Sunday, November 2 Green Bay Packers 16–14 Chicago Bears 46,484 Chicago Bears 22–18–4
1941 Sunday, December 14* Chicago Bears 33–14 Green Bay Packers 43,425 Chicago Bears 23–18–4
1942 Sunday, September 27 Chicago Bears 44–28 Green Bay Packers 20,007 Green Bay Bears 24–18–4
1942 Sunday, November 15 Chicago Bears 38–7 Green Bay Packers 42,787 Chicago Bears 25–18–4
1943 Sunday, September 26 21–21 23,675 Green Bay Bears 25–18–5
1943 Sunday, November 7 Chicago Bears 21–7 Green Bay Packers 43,425 Chicago Bears 26–18–5
1944 Sunday, September 24 Green Bay Packers 42–28 Chicago Bears 24,362 Green Bay Bears 26–19–5
1944 Sunday, November 5 Chicago Bears 21–0 Green Bay Packers 45,553 Chicago Bears 27–19–5
1945 Sunday, September 30 Green Bay Packers 31–21 Chicago Bears 24,525 Green Bay Bears 27–20–5
1945 Sunday, November 4 Chicago Bears 28–24 Green Bay Packers 45,527 Chicago Bears 28–20–5
1946 Sunday, September 29 Chicago Bears 30–7 Green Bay Packers 25,049 Green Bay Bears 29–20–5
1946 Sunday, November 3 Chicago Bears 10–7 Green Bay Packers 46,321 Chicago Bears 30–20–5
1947 Sunday, September 28 Green Bay Packers 29–20 Chicago Bears 25,461 Green Bay Bears 30–21–5
1947 Sunday, November 9 Chicago Bears 20–17 Green Bay Packers 46,112 Chicago Bears 31–21–5
1948 Sunday, September 26 Chicago Bears 45–7 Green Bay Packers 25,546 Green Bay Bears 32–21–5
1948 Sunday, November 14 Chicago Bears 7–6 Green Bay Packers 48,113 Chicago Bears 33–21–5
1949 Sunday, September 25 Chicago Bears 17–0 Green Bay Packers 25,571 Green Bay Bears 34–21–5
1949 Sunday, November 6 Chicago Bears 24–3 Green Bay Packers 47,218 Chicago Bears 35–21–5
  • Bears outscore Packers 489–286 (this does not include the 1941 playoff game)

1950s (Bears 14–5–1)

Year Date Winner Result Loser Attendance Location Series Record
1950 Sunday, October 1 Green Bay Packers 31–21 Chicago Bears 24,893 Green Bay Bears 35–22–5
1950 Sunday, October 15 Chicago Bears 28–14 Green Bay Packers 51,065 Chicago Bears 36–22–5
1951 Sunday, September 30 Chicago Bears 31–20 Green Bay Packers 24,666 Green Bay Bears 37–22–5
1951 Sunday, November 18 Chicago Bears 24–13 Green Bay Packers 36,771 Chicago Bears 38–22–5
1952 Sunday, September 28 Chicago Bears 24–14 Green Bay Packers 24,656 Green Bay Bears 39–22–5
1952 Sunday, November 9 Green Bay Packers 41–28 Chicago Bears 41,751 Chicago Bears 39–23–5
1953 Sunday, October 4 Chicago Bears 17–13 Green Bay Packers 24,835 Green Bay Bears 40–23–5
1953 Sunday, November 8 21–21 39,889 Chicago Bears 40–23–6
1954 Sunday, October 3 Chicago Bears 10–3 Green Bay Packers 24,414 Green Bay Bears 41–23–6
1954 Sunday, November 7 Chicago Bears 28–23 Green Bay Packers 47,038 Chicago Bears 42–23–6
1955 Sunday, October 2 Chicago Bears 52–31 Green Bay Packers 48,890 Chicago Bears 43–23–6
1955 Sunday, November 6 Green Bay Packers 24–3 Chicago Bears 24,662 Green Bay Bears 43–24–6
1956 Sunday, October 7 Chicago Bears 37–21 Green Bay Packers 24,668 Green Bay Bears 44–24–6
1956 Sunday, November 11 Chicago Bears 38–14 Green Bay Packers 49,172 Chicago Bears 45–24–6
1957 Sunday, September 29 Green Bay Packers 21–17 Chicago Bears 32,132 Green Bay Bears 45–25–6
1957 Sunday, November 10 Chicago Bears 21–14 Green Bay Packers 47,153 Chicago Bears 46–25–6
1958 Sunday, September 28 Chicago Bears 34–20 Green Bay Packers 32,150 Green Bay Bears 47–25–6
1958 Sunday, November 9 Chicago Bears 24–10 Green Bay Packers 48,424 Chicago Bears 48–25–6
1959 Sunday, September 27 Green Bay Packers 9–6 Chicago Bears 32,150 Green Bay Bears 48–26–6
1959 Sunday, November 8 Chicago Bears 28–17 Green Bay Packers 46,205 Chicago Bears 49–26–6
  • Bears outscore Packers 492–374

1960s (Packers 15–5)

Year Date Winner Result Loser Attendance Location Series Record
1960 Sunday, September 25 Chicago Bears 17–14 Green Bay Packers 32,150 Green Bay Bears 50–26–6
1960 Sunday, December 4 Green Bay Packers 41–13 Chicago Bears 46,406 Chicago Bears 50–27–6
1961 Sunday, October 1 Green Bay Packers 24–0 Chicago Bears 38,669 Green Bay Bears 50–28–6
1961 Sunday, November 12 Green Bay Packers 31–28 Chicago Bears 49,711 Chicago Bears 50–29–6
1962 Sunday, September 30 Green Bay Packers 49–0 Chicago Bears 38,669 Green Bay Bears 50–30–6
1962 Sunday, November 4 Green Bay Packers 38–7 Chicago Bears 48,753 Chicago Bears 50–31–6
1963 Sunday, September 15 Chicago Bears 10–3 Green Bay Packers 42,327 Green Bay Bears 51–31–6
1963 Sunday, November 17 Chicago Bears 26–7 Green Bay Packers 49,166 Chicago Bears 52–31–6
1964 Sunday, September 13 Green Bay Packers 23–12 Chicago Bears 42,327 Green Bay Bears 52–32–6
1964 Saturday, December 5 Green Bay Packers 17–3 Chicago Bears 43,636 Chicago Bears 52–33–6
1965 Sunday, October 3 Green Bay Packers 23–14 Chicago Bears 50,852 Green Bay Bears 52–34–6
1965 Sunday, October 31 Chicago Bears 31–10 Green Bay Packers 45,664 Chicago Bears 53–34–6
1966 Sunday, October 23 Green Bay Packers 17–0 Chicago Bears 48,573 Chicago Bears 53–35–6
1966 Sunday, November 6 Green Bay Packers 13–6 Chicago Bears 50,861 Green Bay Bears 53–36–6
1967 Sunday, September 24 Green Bay Packers 13–10 Chicago Bears 50,861 Green Bay Bears 53–37–6
1967 Sunday, November 26 Green Bay Packers 17–13 Chicago Bears 47,513 Chicago Bears 53–38–6
1968 Sunday, November 3 Chicago Bears 13–10 Green Bay Packers 50,861 Green Bay Bears 54–38–6
1968 Sunday, December 15 Green Bay Packers 28–27 Chicago Bears 46,435 Chicago Bears 54–39–6
1969 Sunday, September 21 Green Bay Packers 17–0 Chicago Bears 50,861 Green Bay Bears 54–40–6
1969 Sunday, December 14 Green Bay Packers 21–3 Chicago Bears 45,216 Chicago Bears 54–41–6
  • Packers outscore Bears 416–233

1970s (Bears 11–9)

Year Date Winner Result Loser Attendance Location Series Record
1970 Sunday, November 15 Green Bay Packers 20–19 Chicago Bears 56,263 Green Bay Bears 54–42–6
1970 Sunday, December 13 Chicago Bears 35–17 Green Bay Packers 44,957 Chicago Bears 55–42–6
1971 Sunday, November 7 Green Bay Packers 17–14 Chicago Bears 55,049 Chicago Bears 55–43–6
1971 Sunday, December 12 Green Bay Packers 31–10 Chicago Bears 56,263 Green Bay Bears 55–44–6
1972 Sunday, October 8 Green Bay Packers 20–17 Chicago Bears 56,263 Green Bay Bears 55–45–6
1972 Sunday, November 12 Green Bay Packers 23–17 Chicago Bears 55,701 Chicago Bears 55–46–6
1973 Sunday, November 4 Chicago Bears 31–17 Green Bay Packers 56,267 Green Bay Bears 56–46–6
1973 Sunday, December 16 Green Bay Packers 21–0 Chicago Bears 55,701 Chicago Bears 56–47–6
1974 Monday, October 21 Chicago Bears 10–9 Green Bay Packers 55,453 Chicago Bears 57–47–6
1974 Sunday, November 10 Green Bay Packers 20–3 Chicago Bears 48,273 Milwaukee Bears 57–48–6
1975 Sunday, November 9 Chicago Bears 27–14 Green Bay Packers 57,455 Chicago Bears 58–48–6
1975 Sunday, November 30 Green Bay Packers 28–7 Chicago Bears 56,267 Green Bay Bears 58–49–6
1976 Sunday, November 14 Chicago Bears 24–13 Green Bay Packers 57,359 Chicago Bears 59–49–6
1976 Sunday, November 28 Chicago Bears 16–10 Green Bay Packers 56,267 Green Bay Bears 60–49–6
1977 Sunday, October 30 Chicago Bears 26–0 Green Bay Packers 56,267 Green Bay Bears 61–49–6
1977 Sunday, December 11 Chicago Bears 21–10 Green Bay Packers 57,359 Chicago Bears 62–49–6
1978 Sunday, October 8 Green Bay Packers 24–14 Chicago Bears 56,267 Green Bay Bears 62–50–6
1978 Sunday, December 10 Chicago Bears 14–0 Green Bay Packers 57,359 Chicago Bears 63–50–6
1979 Sunday, September 2 Chicago Bears 6–3 Green Bay Packers 56,515 Chicago Bears 64–50–6
1979 Sunday, December 9 Chicago Bears 15–14 Green Bay Packers 54,207 Green Bay Bears 65–50–6
  • Bears outscore Packers 326–311

1980s (Bears 11–7)

Year Date Winner Result Loser Attendance Location Series Record
1980 Sunday, September 7 Green Bay Packers 12–6 Chicago Bears 54,381 Green Bay Bears 65–51–6
1980 Sunday, December 7 Chicago Bears 61–7 Green Bay Packers 57,176 Chicago Bears 66–51–6
1981 Sunday, September 6 Green Bay Packers 16–9 Chicago Bears 62,411 Chicago Bears 66–52–6
1981 Sunday, November 29 Green Bay Packers 21–17 Chicago Bears 55,338 Green Bay Bears 66–53–6
1983 Sunday, December 4 Green Bay Packers 31–28 Chicago Bears 51,147 Green Bay Bears 66–54–6
1983 Sunday, December 18 Chicago Bears 23–21 Green Bay Packers 35,807 Chicago Bears 67–54–6
1984 Sunday, September 16 Chicago Bears 9–7 Green Bay Packers 55,942 Green Bay Bears 68–54–6
1984 Sunday, December 9 Green Bay Packers 20–14 Chicago Bears 59,374 Chicago Bears 68–55–6
1985 Monday, October 21 Chicago Bears 23–7 Green Bay Packers 65,095 Chicago Bears 69–55–6
1985 Sunday, November 3 Chicago Bears 16–10 Green Bay Packers 56,895 Green Bay Bears 70–55–6
1986 Monday, September 22 Chicago Bears 25–12 Green Bay Packers 55,527 Green Bay Bears 71–55–6
1986 Sunday, November 23 Chicago Bears 12–10 Green Bay Packers 59,291 Chicago Bears 72–55–6
1987 Sunday, November 8 Chicago Bears 26–24 Green Bay Packers 53,320 Green Bay Bears 73–55–6
1987 Sunday, November 29 Chicago Bears 23–10 Green Bay Packers 61,638 Chicago Bears 74–55–6
1988 Sunday, September 25 Chicago Bears 24–6 Green Bay Packers 56,492 Green Bay Bears 75–55–6
1988 Sunday, November 27 Chicago Bears 16–0 Green Bay Packers 62,026 Chicago Bears 76–55–6
1989 Monday, November 6 Green Bay Packers 14–13 Chicago Bears 56,556 Green Bay Bears 76–56–6
1989 Sunday, December 17 Green Bay Packers 40–28 Chicago Bears 44,781 Chicago Bears 76–57–6
  • Bears outscore Packers 373–268

1990s (Packers 13–7)

Year Date Winner Result Loser Attendance Location Series Record
1990 Sunday, September 16 Chicago Bears 31–13 Green Bay Packers 58,938 Green Bay Bears 77–57–6
1990 Sunday, October 7 Chicago Bears 27–13 Green Bay Packers 59,929 Chicago Bears 78–57–6
1991 Thursday, October 17 Chicago Bears 10–0 Green Bay Packers 58,435 Green Bay Bears 79–57–6
1991 Sunday, December 8 Chicago Bears 27–13 Green Bay Packers 62,353 Chicago Bears 80–57–6
1992 Sunday, October 25 Chicago Bears 30–10 Green Bay Packers 59,435 Green Bay Bears 81–57–6
1992 Sunday, November 22 Green Bay Packers 17–3 Chicago Bears 56,170 Chicago Bears 81–58–6
1993 Sunday, October 31 Green Bay Packers 17–3 Chicago Bears 58,945 Green Bay Bears 81–59–6
1993 Sunday, December 5 Chicago Bears 30–17 Green Bay Packers 62,236 Chicago Bears 82–59–6
1994 Monday, October 31 Green Bay Packers 33–6 Chicago Bears 47,381 Chicago Bears 82–60–6
1994 Sunday, December 11 Green Bay Packers 40–3 Chicago Bears 57,927 Green Bay Bears 82–61–6
1995 Monday, September 11 Green Bay Packers 27–24 Chicago Bears 64,855 Chicago Bears 82–62–6
1995 Sunday, November 12 Green Bay Packers 35–28 Chicago Bears 59,996 Green Bay Bears 82–63–6
1996 Sunday, October 6 Green Bay Packers 37–6 Chicago Bears 65,480 Chicago Bears 82–64–6
1996 Sunday, December 1 Green Bay Packers 28–17 Chicago Bears 59,682 Green Bay Bears 82–65–6
1997 Monday, September 1 Green Bay Packers 38–24 Chicago Bears 60,766 Green Bay Bears 82–66–6
1997 Sunday, October 12 Green Bay Packers 24–23 Chicago Bears 62,212 Chicago Bears 82–67–6
1998 Sunday, December 13 Green Bay Packers 26–20 Chicago Bears 59,813 Green Bay Bears 82–68–6
1998 Sunday, December 27 Green Bay Packers 16–13 Chicago Bears 58,393 Chicago Bears 82–69–6
1999 Sunday, November 7 Chicago Bears 14–13 Green Bay Packers 59,867 Green Bay Bears 83–69–6
1999 Sunday, December 5 Green Bay Packers 35–19 Chicago Bears 66,944 Chicago Bears 83–70–6
  • Packers outscore Bears 452–358

2000s (Packers 12–8)

Year Date Winner Result Loser Attendance Location Series Record
2000 Sunday, October 1 Chicago Bears 27–24 Green Bay Packers 59,869 Green Bay Bears 84–70–6
2000 Sunday, December 3 Green Bay Packers 28–6 Chicago Bears 66,994 Chicago Bears 84–71–6
2001 Sunday, November 11 Green Bay Packers 20–12 Chicago Bears 66,944 Chicago Bears 84–72–6
2001 Sunday, December 9 Green Bay Packers 17–7 Chicago Bears 59,869 Green Bay Bears 84–73–6
2002 Monday, October 7 Green Bay Packers 34–21 Chicago Bears 63,226 Champaign Bears 84–74–6
2002 Sunday, December 1 Green Bay Packers 30–20 Chicago Bears 64,196 Green Bay Bears 84–75–6
2003 Monday, September 29 Green Bay Packers 38–23 Chicago Bears 61,500 Chicago Bears 84–76–6
2003 Sunday, December 7 Green Bay Packers 34–21 Chicago Bears 70,458 Green Bay Bears 84–77–6
2004 Sunday, September 19 Chicago Bears 21–10 Green Bay Packers 70,688 Green Bay Bears 85–77–6
2005 Sunday, January 2 Green Bay Packers 31–14 Chicago Bears 62,197 Chicago Bears 85–78–6
2005 Sunday, December 4 Chicago Bears 19–7 Green Bay Packers 62,177 Chicago Bears 86–78–6
2005 Sunday, December 25 Chicago Bears 24–17 Green Bay Packers 69,757 Green Bay Bears 87–78–6
2006 Sunday, September 10 Chicago Bears 26–0 Green Bay Packers 70,918 Green Bay Bears 88–78–6
2006 Sunday, December 31 Green Bay Packers 26–7 Chicago Bears 62,287 Chicago Bears 88–79–6
2007 Sunday, October 7 Chicago Bears 27–20 Green Bay Packers 70,904 Green Bay Bears 89–79–6
2007 Sunday, December 23 Chicago Bears 35–7 Green Bay Packers 62,272 Chicago Bears 90–79–6
2008 Sunday, November 16 Green Bay Packers 37–3 Chicago Bears 71,040 Green Bay Bears 90–80–6
2008 Monday, December 22 Chicago Bears 20–17 Green Bay Packers 62,151 Chicago Bears 91–80–6
2009 Sunday, September 13 Green Bay Packers 21–15 Chicago Bears 70,920 Green Bay Bears 91–81–6
2009 Sunday, December 13 Green Bay Packers 21–14 Chicago Bears 62,214 Chicago Bears 91–82–6
  • Packers outscore Bears 439–362

2010s (Packers 15–4)

Year Date Winner Result Loser Attendance Location Series Record
2010 Monday, September 27 Chicago Bears 20–17 Green Bay Packers 62,179 Chicago Bears 92–82–6
2011 Sunday, January 2 Green Bay Packers 10–3 Chicago Bears 70,833 Green Bay Bears 92–83–6
2011 Sunday, January 23* Green Bay Packers 21–14 Chicago Bears 62,377 Chicago Bears 92–84–6
2011 Sunday, September 25 Green Bay Packers 27–17 Chicago Bears 62,339 Chicago Bears 92–85–6
2011 Sunday, December 25 Green Bay Packers 35–21 Chicago Bears 70,574 Green Bay Bears 92–86–6
2012 Thursday, September 13 Green Bay Packers 23–10 Chicago Bears 70,543 Green Bay Bears 92–87–6
2012 Sunday, December 16 Green Bay Packers 21–13 Chicago Bears 62,534 Chicago Bears 92–88–6
2013 Monday, November 4 Chicago Bears 27–20 Green Bay Packers 78,122 Green Bay Bears 93–88–6
2013 Sunday, December 29 Green Bay Packers 33–28 Chicago Bears 62,708 Chicago Bears 93–89–6
2014 Sunday, September 28 Green Bay Packers 38–17 Chicago Bears 61,736 Chicago Bears 93–90–6
2014 Thursday, November 6 Green Bay Packers 55–14 Chicago Bears 78,292 Green Bay Bears 93–91–6
2015 Sunday, September 13 Green Bay Packers 31–23 Chicago Bears 62,442 Chicago Bears 93–92–6
2015 Thursday, November 26 Chicago Bears 17–13 Green Bay Packers 78,488 Green Bay Bears 94–92–6
2016 Thursday, October 20 Green Bay Packers 26–10 Chicago Bears 78,217 Green Bay Bears 94–93–6
2016 Sunday, December 18 Green Bay Packers 30–27 Chicago Bears 61,137 Chicago Tied 94–94–6
2017 Thursday, September 28 Green Bay Packers 35–14 Chicago Bears 72,928 Green Bay Packers 95–94–6
2017 Sunday, November 12 Green Bay Packers 23–16 Chicago Bears 55,661 Chicago Packers 96–94–6
2018 Sunday, September 9 Green Bay Packers 24–23 Chicago Bears 78,282 Green Bay Packers 97–94–6
2018 Sunday, December 16 Chicago Bears 24–17 Green Bay Packers 62,372 Chicago Packers 97–95–6
  • Packers outscore Bears 478–324 (this does not include the 2011 playoff game)

* – Denotes a Playoff Game

Connections between the two teams

Name Pos. Years with Bears Years with Packers
Jim Flanigan DT 1994–2000 2001
John Thierry DE 1994–98 2000—01

See also

Other rivalries involving the two teams

References

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  2. ^ "History is special between old rivals". Foxsportswisconsin.com. Retrieved 2012-09-05.
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  4. ^ "1929 Green Bay Packers". Pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved 2012-09-05.
  5. ^ "1929 NFL Standings". Pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved 2012-09-05.
  6. ^ "1930 Green Bay Packers". Pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved 2012-09-05.
  7. ^ "1930 NFL Standings". Pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved 2012-09-05.
  8. ^ Pro-Football-Reference.com Game Finder Query. "1st Five Games". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved 2011-01-26.
  9. ^ "Myth is Broken". Sarasota Herald Tribune. Associated Press. Retrieved 2011-01-26.
  10. ^ "Don Hutson near last year mark". Milwaukee Journal. Associated Press. Retrieved 2011-01-26.
  11. ^ "Secret Defense". Milwaukee Journal. Associated Press. Retrieved 2011-01-26.
  12. ^ Pro-Football-Reference.com Game Finder. "Packers 16 at Bears 14". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved 2011-01-26.
  13. ^ Mayer, Larry (March 9, 2012). "Bears shocked Packers with last-minute free kick". Chicagobears.com. Retrieved 2012-09-05.
  14. ^ Taylor, Roy (December 7, 1980). "1980 Chicago Bears". Bearshistory.com. Retrieved 2012-09-05.
  15. ^ Mayer, Larry (2013-03-05). "Bears crushed Packers in memorable 1980 meeting". Chicago Bears. Retrieved 2013-03-05.
  16. ^ a b America's Game: The Super Bowl Champions, "#2. 1985 Chicago Bears." Premiered on CBS, February 3, 2007
  17. ^ a b Youtube. "1985 Chicago Bears vs Green Bay Packers". Youtube.com. Archived from the original on January 4, 2011. Retrieved 2011-02-01.
  18. ^ Haugh, David (February 1, 2005). "To Bears fans, Charles Martin will always be recalled for the body slam that ended Jim McMahon's season in 1986. But there was more to the man they buried Monday. – Chicago Tribune". Articles.chicagotribune.com. Retrieved 2012-09-05.
  19. ^ Michael Janofsky (November 26, 1986). "Martin of Packers Suspended". NYTimes.com. Retrieved 2012-09-05.
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  21. ^ a b "Brett Favre's memorable moments". USA Today. Associated Press. March 4, 2008. Retrieved 2011-01-24.
  22. ^ Vaughn McClure (March 5, 2008). "Chicago's very owned". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 2011-01-24.
  23. ^ Jay Taft (March 4, 2008). "Bears say hello playoffs, bye Brett". Lincoln Courier. Archived from the original on December 25, 2011. Retrieved January 24, 2011.
  24. ^ Brad Biggs (March 4, 2008). "All-time Bears killer Favre calls it a career". Chicago Sun Times. Archived from the original on December 25, 2011. Retrieved January 24, 2011.
  25. ^ "Favre held without TD pass as Bears win eighth straight". Sports.espn.go.com. December 4, 2005. Retrieved 2012-09-05.
  26. ^ ESPN Research. "Favre's top 10 career moments". ESPN.com. Retrieved 2011-01-24.
  27. ^ Pete Dougherty. "Packers 35 Bears 28". Packersnews.com. Archived from the original on December 3, 2007. Retrieved 2007-12-20.
  28. ^ Press Release. "'Packers Share Division Lead With 5–2 Record". Packers.com. Archived from the original on February 21, 2005. Retrieved 2007-12-20.
  29. ^ Taylor, Roy. "Soldier Field History". Bearshistory.com. Retrieved 2012-09-05.
  30. ^ "Bears shut out Favre, Packers". Usatoday.Com. September 10, 2006. Retrieved 2012-09-05.
  31. ^ "Packers vs. Bears – Game Recap – September 27, 2010 – ESPN". ESPN.com.
  32. ^ "Official Site of the National Football League - NFL.com". www.nfl.com.
  33. ^ a b "2010 NFC Championship: Green Bay Packers vs. Chicago Bears – NFL Playoffs – ESPN". Espn.go.com. Retrieved 2012-09-05.
  34. ^ a b "NFL Game Center: Pittsburgh Steelers at Green Bay Packers – 2010 Super Bowl". Nfl.com. Retrieved 2012-09-05.
  35. ^ "Fox's TD challenge results in Bears turnover". espn.com.
  36. ^ "Packers vs. Bears – Game Summary – November 12, 2017 – ESPN". ESPN.com.
  37. ^ http://www.espn.com/nfl/game?gameId=401030893
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  41. ^ Includes pre and post merger
  42. ^ All NFL Divisional titles between 1933 and 2007
  43. ^ All NFL Championship Games between 1933 and 1969
  44. ^ All Super Bowls from I through XLIV (1966–2009)
  45. ^ Includes the Unofficial 1932 NFL Championship.

Further reading

1982 Chicago Bears season

The 1982 Chicago Bears season was their 63rd regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 3–6 record under first year head coach Mike Ditka in a strike shortened season.

The strike also prevented the Bears–Packers rivalry from being played this year, making the Lions–Packers rivalry the longest-running annual series in the league.

1982 Green Bay Packers season

The 1982 Green Bay Packers season was their 64th season overall and their 62nd season in the National Football League and shortened due to a players strike. The club posted a 5–3–1 record under coach Bart Starr. Due to the strike, the NFL ignored division standing and placed eight teams from each conference into the playoffs. The Packers finished the season in third place which earned them a playoff berth. The Packers beat the Cardinals 41–16 in the first round, but lost to the Dallas Cowboys 37–26 in the second. Their playoff berth was the first for the Packers in ten seasons, and their only playoff win from 1968 to 1992.

The strike prevented both games of the Bears–Packers rivalry from being played this year, making the Lions–Packers rivalry the longest-running annual series in the league. It also led to Milwaukee becoming the Packers primary home by happenstance, as three of their four regular season home games were played at Milwaukee County Stadium.

1985 Chicago Bears season

The 1985 Chicago Bears season was their 66th regular season and 16th post-season completed in the National Football League (NFL). The Bears entered 1985 looking to improve on their 10–6 record from 1984 and advance further than the NFC Championship Game, where they lost to the 15–1 San Francisco 49ers. Not only did the Bears improve on that record, they put together one of the greatest seasons in NFL history.

The Bears won fifteen games, as the 49ers had the year before, and won their first twelve before losing. The Bears' defense was ranked first in the league and only allowed 198 total points (an average of 12.4 points per game). The Bears won the NFC Central Division by seven games over the second place Green Bay Packers and earned the NFC's top seed and home field advantage throughout the playoffs at Soldier Field. In their two playoff games against the New York Giants and Los Angeles Rams, the Bears outscored their opponents 45–0 and became the first team to record back-to-back playoff shutouts. Then, in Super Bowl XX in New Orleans against the New England Patriots, the Bears set several more records. First, their 46 points broke the record that had been set by the Los Angeles Raiders in 1984 with 38 and tied by the 49ers the following year. Their 36-point margin of victory topped the 29-point margin of victory that the Raiders had put up in Super Bowl XVIII and stood as a record until the 49ers won Super Bowl XXIV, also in New Orleans, by 45 points over the Denver Broncos. It was the Bears' first NFL World Championship title since 1963.

The 1985 Chicago Bears are one of the few teams to consistently challenge the undefeated 1972 Miami Dolphins for the unofficial title of the greatest NFL team of all time. In 2007, the 1985 Bears were ranked as the second greatest Super Bowl championship team on the NFL Network's documentary series America's Game: The Super Bowl Champions, ranking behind the 1972 Dolphins. Other sources rate the 1985 Chicago Bears as the greatest NFL team ever.

2015 NFL season

The 2015 NFL season was the 96th season in the history of the National Football League (NFL), and the 50th of the Super Bowl era. The season began on Thursday, September 10, 2015, with the annual kickoff game featuring the defending Super Bowl XLIX champion New England Patriots hosting the Pittsburgh Steelers. The season concluded with Super Bowl 50, the league's championship game, on Sunday, February 7, 2016, at Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, California, with the Denver Broncos defeating the Carolina Panthers 24–10.

During the 2015 season, the Oakland Raiders, the St. Louis Rams, and the San Diego Chargers announced their intentions to relocate back to Los Angeles in the ensuing offseason (all three teams had previously resided in the city at various points in their history). NFL owners eventually only approved the relocation of the Rams, by a vote of 30–2 on January 12, 2016. Thus, 2015 ended up being the Rams' last season in St. Louis.

Bears–Lions rivalry

The Bears–Lions rivalry is a National Football League (NFL) rivalry between the Chicago Bears and Detroit Lions. The franchises first met in 1930 when the Lions were known as the Portsmouth Spartans and based in Portsmouth, Ohio. They moved to Detroit for the 1934 season. The Bears and Lions have been division rivals since 1933 and have usually met twice a season since the Lions franchise began. The two teams play in the two largest metropolitan areas in the Midwest. Also, Chicago and Detroit’s home stadiums, Soldier Field and Ford Field, are 280 miles apart and easily accessible from I-94.

This rivalry is also the longest-running annual series in the NFL as both teams have met at least once a season since 1930. (Due to the 1982 strike, the Bears–Packers rivalry was not played that season.) However, one of the two meetings between both teams was cancelled during Week 3 of the 1987 season, which does not make this rivalry the longest-running continuous series in the NFL (that feat belongs to the Lions–Packers rivalry, who have met at least twice a season since 1932 without any cancelled meetings).

Bears–Vikings rivalry

The Bears–Vikings rivalry is an NFL rivalry between the Chicago Bears and Minnesota Vikings.

It began when the Vikings entered the league as an expansion team in 1961. The first time these two teams met, the Vikings stunned the Bears 37–13 in Minnesota. Both teams are members of the NFC North, and play at least twice a year. The rivalry has generally seen the home team win and has recently been the sight of thriller games with huge swings. The rivalry is known for having had many offensive-oriented contests, and also several surprising results.

Big East Conference rivalries

The Big East Conference, founded in 2013, features many ongoing rivalries among its members. Many deal with the basketball teams, the primary focus of the conference.

Brewers–Cubs rivalry

The Brewers–Cubs rivalry is a Major League Baseball (MLB) rivalry between the Milwaukee Brewers and Chicago Cubs. Both clubs are members of MLB's National League (NL) Central division. The rivalry is also sometimes known as the I-94 Rivalry, because the two teams' ballparks are located only 83.3 miles (134.1 km) from each other off Interstate 94 (I-94). Bob Uecker and Harry Caray have been sportscasters for their respective teams.

The Brewers and Cubs have been playing each other in spring training Cactus League games since the Brewers franchise began as the Seattle Pilots in 1969. However, this budding rivalry did not begin to grow until 1998, when the Brewers moved from the American League Central Division to the National League Central. Until then, the Brewers had a rivalry with Chicago's AL team, the White Sox.

Chicago Bears

The Chicago Bears are a professional American football team based in Chicago, Illinois. The Bears compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) North division. The Bears have won nine NFL Championships, including one Super Bowl, and hold the NFL record for the most enshrinees in the Pro Football Hall of Fame and the most retired jersey numbers. The Bears have also recorded more victories than any other NFL franchise.The franchise was founded in Decatur, Illinois, on September 17, 1920, and moved to Chicago in 1921. It is one of only two remaining franchises from the NFL's founding in 1920, along with the Arizona Cardinals, which was originally also in Chicago. The team played home games at Wrigley Field on Chicago's North Side through the 1970 season; they now play at Soldier Field on the Near South Side, next to Lake Michigan. The Bears have a long-standing rivalry with the Green Bay Packers.The team headquarters, Halas Hall, is in the Chicago suburb of Lake Forest, Illinois. The Bears practice at adjoining facilities there during the season. Since 2002, the Bears have held their annual training camp, from late July to mid-August, at Ward Field on the campus of Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais, Illinois.

Dick Barker

Richard William Barker Jr. (January 6, 1897 – December 17, 1964) was an American football player and coach, wrestler and coach, and athletic director. He played professional football for the Chicago Staleys. Barker served as the head football coach at Cornell College and Franklin & Marshall College as well as starting the wrestling programs at Michigan and Cornell College.

Don Kindt

Donald John "Don" Kindt, Sr. (July 2, 1925 – May 5, 2000) was an American defensive back and halfback who played nine seasons from 1947 to 1955 for the Chicago Bears in the National Football League. Kindt played college football for the University of Wisconsin Badgers primarily as a halfback from 1943–1946, missing the 1944 and half of the 1945 season because of World War II. He was the starting halfback for the Badgers for most of his college career.

Kindt decided to forgo his senior season at Wisconsin in order to be eligible for the 1947 NFL Draft. He was selected with the last pick of the first round (eleventh overall) by the Bears despite having an history with injuries, and recovering from an off-season knee surgery he suffered while playing a basketball game at Wisconsin. After playing dual positions in his first few seasons with the Bears, Kindt was used primarily on defense for his last six seasons in the league. Considered to be a defensive standout during his playing career, Kindt was selected to participate in one Pro Bowl, and led the team in interceptions several times.

His son Don Kindt, Jr. also played in the National Football League, as a tight end for the Bears during the 1987 season.

Green Bay Packers

The Green Bay Packers are a professional American football team based in Green Bay, Wisconsin. The Packers compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) North division. It is the third-oldest franchise in the NFL, dating back to 1919, and is the only non-profit, community-owned major league professional sports team based in the United States. Home games have been played at Lambeau Field since 1957.

The Packers are the last of the "small town teams" which were common in the NFL during the league's early days of the 1920s and '30s. Founded in 1919 by Earl "Curly" Lambeau and George Whitney Calhoun, the franchise traces its lineage to other semi-professional teams in Green Bay dating back to 1896. Between 1919 and 1920, the Packers competed against other semi-pro clubs from around Wisconsin and the Midwest, before joining the American Professional Football Association (APFA), the forerunner of today's NFL, in 1921. Although Green Bay is by far the smallest major league professional sports market in North America, Forbes ranked the Packers as the world's 26th most valuable sports franchise in 2016, with a value of $2.35 billion.The Packers have won 13 league championships, the most in NFL history, with nine pre–Super Bowl NFL titles and four Super Bowl victories. The Packers won the first two Super Bowls in 1967 and 1968 and were the only NFL team to defeat the American Football League (AFL) prior to the AFL–NFL merger. The Vince Lombardi Trophy is named after the Packers' coach of the same name, who guided them to their first two Super Bowls. Their two subsequent Super Bowl wins came in 1996 and 2010.The Packers are long-standing adversaries of the Chicago Bears, Minnesota Vikings, and Detroit Lions, who today comprise the NFL's NFC North division, and were formerly members of the NFC Central Division. They have played over 100 games against each of those teams through history, and have a winning overall record against all of them, a distinction only shared with the Kansas City Chiefs and Dallas Cowboys. The Bears–Packers rivalry is one of the oldest in NFL history, dating back to 1921.

History of the Chicago Bears

The Chicago Bears American football franchise is a charter member of the National Football League (NFL) and have played in all of the league's 99 seasons. The Bears have captured nine NFL championships – eight NFL championships and one Super Bowl – second most all time behind the Green Bay Packers. The franchise has also recorded more victories than any other franchise with 739, retired the most uniform numbers with fourteen, and have the most members in the Pro Football Hall of Fame with twenty-seven.

The club has played in over a thousand games since becoming a charter member of the NFL in 1920 through the 2016 season.

Lions–Packers rivalry

The Lions–Packers rivalry is an NFL rivalry between the Detroit Lions and Green Bay Packers. They first met in 1930 when the Lions were known as the Portsmouth Spartans and based in Portsmouth, Ohio. The team eventually moved to Detroit for the 1934 season.

The Lions and Packers have been division rivals since 1933, having both played in the NFL's Western Conference from 1933 to 1970 and in the NFC North since 1970 (known as the NFC Central from 1970 to 2001). They have always met at least twice a season since 1932, without any cancelled games between both rivals (as of today). This is therefore the longest continuously-running rivalry in the NFL.

Green Bay is one of three teams with a winning record against all of their divisional opponents with 100-plus head-to-head games played (along with the Dallas Cowboys and the Kansas City Chiefs). Detroit is one of only two teams with a losing record against all of their divisional opponents with 100-plus head-to-head games played (along with the Los Angeles Chargers). This holds true as of the end of the 2018 season.

Moline, Illinois

Moline ( moh-LEEN) is a city located in Rock Island County, Illinois, United States. With a population of 43,977 in 2010, it is the largest city in Rock Island County.

Moline is one of the Quad Cities, along with neighboring East Moline and Rock Island in Illinois and the cities of Davenport and Bettendorf in Iowa. The Quad Cities have an estimated population of 381,342. The city is the ninth-most populated city in Illinois outside the Chicago Metropolitan Area. The corporate headquarters of Deere & Company is located in Moline, as was Montgomery Elevator, which was founded and headquartered in Moline until 1997, when it was acquired by Kone Elevator, which has its U.S. Division headquartered in Moline. Quad City International Airport, Niabi Zoo, Black Hawk College, and the Quad Cities campus of Western Illinois University-Quad Cities. Moline is a retail hub for the Illinois Quad Cities, as South Park Mall and numerous big-box shopping plazas are located in the city.

In the mid-1990s, the city undertook major efforts to revitalize its central business district, which had declined after suburban growth and retail changes after the 1950s and 1960s. Today, Moline's downtown again serves as one of the civic and recreational hubs of the Quad Cities; many events take place at the 12,000-seat TaxSlayer Center (formerly known as The MARK of the Quad Cities and iWireless Center) and at John Deere Commons. Downtown Moline features hotels such as Radisson and Stoney Creek Inn, and commercial areas such as Bass Street Landing and the historic 5th Avenue.

Moline acquired its name after it was platted (surveyed and planned) in 1843. The name derives from the French moulin meaning "mill town".

NFC North

The National Football Conference – Northern Division or NFC North is one of the four divisions of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). Nicknamed the "Black & Blue Division" for the rough and tough rivalry games between the teams, it currently has four members: the Chicago Bears, Detroit Lions, Green Bay Packers, and Minnesota Vikings. The NFC North was previously known as the NFC Central from 1970 to 2001. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers were previously members, from 1977, one year after they joined the league as an expansion team, until 2001 when they moved to the NFC South.

The division was created in 1967 as the Central Division of the NFL's Western Conference and existed for three seasons before the AFL–NFL merger. After the merger, it was renamed the NFC Central and retained that name until the NFL split into eight divisions in 2002. The four current division teams have been together in the same division or conference since the Vikings joined the league in 1961. The Bears, Lions and Packers have been in the same division or conference since the NFL began a conference format in 1933. Largely because the four teams have played each other at least twice a year, with the exception of the strike-shortened 1982 season, for more than half a century (more than 80 years in the case of the Bears, Lions and Packers), the entire division is considered one very large rivalry.

Based on the combined ages of its current teams, the NFC North is the oldest division in the NFL, at a combined 344 years old. The Bears are 99 years old (founded in 1919 in Decatur, Illinois; moved to Chicago in 1921), the Packers are also 99 years old (founded in 1919, but turned professional in 1921), the Lions are 89 years old (founded 1929 in Portsmouth, Ohio; moved to Detroit in 1934), and the Vikings are 57 years old (founded 1961). The division has a total of 11 Super Bowl appearances. The Packers have the most appearances in the Super Bowl with 5, the most recent happening at the conclusion of the 2010 season. The Bears and the Packers have the only Super Bowl wins of this division, a total of 5 (4 for the Packers and 1 for the Bears). Of the top 10 NFL teams with the highest winning percentage throughout its franchise history, three of them are in the NFC North (the Bears, the Packers, and the Vikings). The Lions however, have one of the lowest winning percentages in the NFL, including the first winless 16-game season in NFL history, in 2008.Entering 2018 the Bears led the division with an overall record of 752–581–42, victory in Super Bowl XX and eight pre-Super Bowl league titles; Chicago's overall playoff record is 17–18. The Packers hold an overall record of 740–564–38 with an overall playoff record of 34–22, four Super Bowl titles in five Super Bowl appearances, and nine pre-Super Bowl league titles - bringing the Packers to a total of 13 World Championships, currently the most in the NFL. The Lions hold a record of 555–651–32, four league championships, and a 7–13 playoff record. As the youngest (in terms of franchise age) team in the division, the Vikings hold a record of 473–392–11, a playoff record of 20-29, and had won a league title the season before the merger (although they subsequently lost Super Bowl IV).

This division earned the moniker "Black and Blue Division" due to its intense rivalries and physical style of play, and this nickname is still used regularly today. It is also known as the "Frostbite Division" as all teams played home games in late season winter cold until the mid-1970s. The division is also humorously called the "Frozen North", although Detroit has played its home games indoors since 1975, and Minnesota also did so from 1982 to 2013 and returned to indoor home games at U.S. Bank Stadium in 2016. ESPN sportscaster Chris Berman often refers to this division as the "NFC Norris" because of its geographical similarity to the National Hockey League's former Norris Division.

National Football League rivalries

As with all sports leagues, there are a number of significant rivalries in the National Football League (NFL). Rivalries are occasionally created due to a particular event that causes bad blood between teams, players, coaches, or owners, but for the most part, they arise simply due to the frequency with which some teams play each other, and sometimes exist for geographic reasons.

Rivalries in the NFL are commonly recognized as such by fans and players alike. While many rivalries are well established, others are of more recent vintage, accepted as existing by the nature of the competition and history between the two teams. Other rivalries have fallen by the wayside due to league realignment and reduction in frequencies of meetings.

National Hockey League rivalries

Rivalries in the National Hockey League have occurred between many teams and cities. Rivalries have arisen for many different reasons, the primary ones including geographic proximity, familiarity with opponents, on-ice incidents, and cultural, linguistic, or national pride.

The importance of these various factors has varied widely throughout the history of the league.

Packers–Vikings rivalry

The Packers–Vikings rivalry is an NFL rivalry between the Green Bay Packers and Minnesota Vikings.The rivalry began in 1961, when the Minnesota Vikings entered the league as an expansion team. The rivalry is known for its many close games and the parity of the all-time series. It is considered to be one of Minnesota's most intense rivalries, due to both teams being located in the same division since the Vikings' inception, and the fact that the two states (Minnesota and Wisconsin) are geographically located side by side, thereby allowing them to compete in multiple sports in other leagues such as the Big Ten Conference, although Green Bay's primary rival is the Chicago Bears.

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