Bears–Lions rivalry

The Bears–Lions rivalry is a National Football League (NFL) rivalry between the Chicago Bears and Detroit Lions. The franchises first met in 1930 when the Lions were known as the Portsmouth Spartans and based in Portsmouth, Ohio. They moved to Detroit for the 1934 season. The Bears and Lions have been division rivals since 1933 and have usually met twice a season since the Lions franchise began. The two teams play in the two largest metropolitan areas in the Midwest. Chicago and Detroit’s home stadiums, Soldier Field and Ford Field, are 280 miles apart and both are easily accessible from I-94.

This rivalry is the longest-running annual series in the NFL as both teams have met at least once a season since 1930.[1] (Due to the 1982 strike, the Bears–Packers rivalry, which began in 1921, was not played that season.)

The Bears lead the overall series 99–74–5. The Bears won the only playoff meeting between the two teams, the 1932 NFL Championship Game, 9–0.

Chicago Bears wordmark
Chicago Bears
Detroit Lions wordmark
Detroit Lions
Detroit Lions wordmark

Notable rivalry moments

  • The 1932 regular season ended with the Spartans (6–1–4) and Bears (6–1–6) tied atop the NFL standings (at the time, ties were not considered in a team's win percentage). There were no playoffs at the time and the champion was simply the team with the better win percentage with head-to-head results serving as the only tiebreaker. As both teams had the same record and they tied both of their meetings during the season, the NFL staged its first ever playoff game. The teams were set to meet at Wrigley Field, but the game was instead moved to the indoor Chicago Stadium due to severe weather, and modified rules were used because the stadium was smaller than regulation size. The Bears won the game, 9–0, to claim the NFL title. The championship game proved to be popular, so the league split into two divisions beginning in 1933 and staged a championship game between the two division winners at the end of the season. To date, this is the two teams' only playoff meeting (although the game officially counted in the regular season standings).
  • The Lions, having just moved to Detroit, decided to schedule an annual game on Thanksgiving in an attempt to draw fans. This idea proved to work as the game was played in front of a sellout crowd. The Bears entered the game with a perfect 11–0 record, while the Lions were 10–1. The Lions built a 16–7 lead at halftime, but the Bears would score 12 unanswered points in the second half to come away with the 19–16 to clinch the NFL Western Division title. The Bears and Lions have met a total of 17 times on Thanksgiving, all in Detroit, with the Bears holding a 9–8 record in the Thanksgiving meetings.
  • Lions WR Chuck Hughes collapsed on the field and was rushed to the hospital, where he was pronounced dead. He remains the only player in NFL history to have died on the field.
  • The Bears come back from 14 points down in the fourth quarter to force overtime. Bears' RB Dave Williams returned the opening kickoff of overtime 95 yards for a touchdown as the Bears left Detroit with a stunning 23–17 win.
  • Lions WR Calvin Johnson appeared to catch a touchdown pass late in the game that would have given the Lions the lead, but it was controversially ruled to not be a catch after Johnson was ruled to not have completed the process of catching the ball. Johnson had the ball in both hands, got both feet down, rolled over on his backside and put his hand with the ball in it on the ground. The call was reviewed on the instant replay review, but the "no catch" ruling was upheld. The rule for what defines a catch was updated in 2015, with this play (along with other similar plays) being a large reason for the change.

See also

Other sports rivalries involving the same cities:

Other rivalries involving the two teams:

References

  1. ^ http://static.nfl.com/static/content/public/image/history/pdfs/History/AT_Tm_v_Tm_2011.pdf
2014 NFL season

The 2014 NFL season was the 95th season in the history of the National Football League (NFL). The season began on Thursday, September 4, 2014, with the annual kickoff game featuring the defending Super Bowl XLVIII champion Seattle Seahawks hosting the Green Bay Packers, which resulted with the Seahawks winning, 36-16. The season concluded with Super Bowl XLIX, the league's championship game, on Sunday, February 1, 2015, at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Arizona, with the New England Patriots defeating the Seattle Seahawks, 28–24.

2016 Chicago Bears season

The 2016 Chicago Bears season was the franchise's 97th season in the National Football League and the second under head coach John Fox.

The Bears looked to improve upon their 6–10 record from 2015; however, they suffered a second consecutive 0–3 start and were plagued by injuries with an NFL-high 19 players on the injured reserve list by the end of the season. Multiple injuries to quarterback Jay Cutler resulted in backups Brian Hoyer and Matt Barkley playing much of the season. They finished with a 3–13 record, the worst record for the team since the NFL's move to 16-game seasons in 1978. The Bears also went 0–8 on the road for the first time in franchise history. After the season, Cutler was released, and initially announced his retirement from the NFL, but he later signed with the Miami Dolphins.

2018 Chicago Bears season

The 2018 Chicago Bears season was the franchise's 99th season in the National Football League, as well as the first under head coach Matt Nagy, who took over the job after John Fox was fired in 2017 following a three-year tenure.

2018 marked their first winning season since 2012 and their first playoff appearance since 2010. The Bears ensured improvement over their 5–11 record from the previous season in Week 10 when they defeated their division rival Detroit Lions. In week 12, they scored their eighth win of the season, also against the Lions, ensuring that the Bears would not have a losing season for the first time since 2013. With a Week 14 win over the Los Angeles Rams, the Bears clinched their first winning season since 2012. With their Week 15 win over the rival Green Bay Packers, the Bears clinched their first playoff berth and division title since 2010. The season ended in disappointment as they lost to the defending Super Bowl champion Philadelphia Eagles, who they had helped get into the playoffs on the last game of the season, in the NFC Wild Card Game 15–16 on January 6, 2019 at Soldier Field.

2018 NFL season

The 2018 NFL season was the 99th season of the National Football League (NFL). The season began on September 6, 2018, with the NFL Kickoff Game with the defending Super Bowl LII champion Philadelphia Eagles defeating the Atlanta Falcons 18–12. The season concluded with Super Bowl LIII, the league's championship game, on February 3, 2019, at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia between NFC Champions Los Angeles Rams and AFC Champions New England Patriots. The Patriots defeated the Rams 13–3 for their sixth Super Bowl championship and their third in their last five seasons.

Bears–Packers rivalry

The Bears–Packers rivalry is a National Football League (NFL) rivalry between the Chicago Bears and the Green Bay Packers. The two clubs have won a combined 22 NFL championships (13 for Green Bay and 9 for Chicago), including five Super Bowl championships (four for Green Bay and one for Chicago) and have 65 members in the Pro Football Hall of Fame (Chicago with 34 and Green Bay with 31).

The rivalry began in 1921 and is the league's most played, with 198 regular-season and post-season games. The rivalry is not the league's longest continuous rivalry, as the 1982 strike-shortened NFL season did not include a Bears–Packers game. That title goes to the rivalry between the Packers and the Detroit Lions, who have played each other at least twice a year since 1932. The Packers and Bears have played in the same conference or division since the NFL went to a conference format in 1933; they played in the NFL's Western Conference from 1933 to 1970, and have been in the NFC North since 1970 (known as the NFC Central from 1970–2001). As such, they usually play each other twice every regular season.

The Packers surpassed the Bears in the overall series in 2017 for the first time since 1932 and now lead, 97–95–6. The Bears had previously led the series by as many as 24 games both in 1960 and in 1992. The two teams have met twice in the NFL playoffs, with each team winning one game.

Bears–Vikings rivalry

The Bears–Vikings rivalry is an NFL rivalry between the Chicago Bears and Minnesota Vikings.

It began when the Vikings entered the league as an expansion team in 1961. The first time these two teams met, the Vikings stunned the Bears 37–13 in Minnesota. Both teams are members of the NFC North, and play at least twice a year. The rivalry is known for having had many offensive-oriented contests, and also several surprising results. The Vikings lead the overall series 60–54–2. The teams have met once in the postseason, a 35–18 Bears win in the 1994 Wild Card Round.

Blackhawks–Red Wings rivalry

The Blackhawks–Red Wings rivalry is a historic rivalry in the National Hockey League (NHL) between the Chicago Blackhawks and Detroit Red Wings. Prior to the 2013–14 league-wide divisional realignment, it was the most intense rivalry in the Central Division during the post-lockout era. They represent the two largest metro areas in the Midwest and are only separated by a 280-mile stretch of road, mostly covered by I-94. The clubs began playing each other in 1926–27, during the inaugural season for both franchises.

Bulls–Pistons rivalry

The Bulls–Pistons rivalry is an NBA rivalry between the Chicago Bulls and Detroit Pistons. The rivalry began in the late 1980s and was one of the most intense in NBA history for a couple of years, when Michael Jordan evolved into one of the league's best players and the Pistons became a playoff contender. They represent the two largest metro areas in the Midwest and are only separated by a 280-mile stretch of road, mostly covered by I-94.

Lions–Packers rivalry

The Lions–Packers rivalry is an NFL rivalry between the Detroit Lions and Green Bay Packers. They first met in 1930 when the Lions were known as the Portsmouth Spartans and based in Portsmouth, Ohio. The team eventually moved to Detroit for the 1934 season.

The Lions and Packers have been division rivals since 1933, having both played in the NFL's Western Conference from 1933 to 1970 and in the NFC North since 1970 (known as the NFC Central from 1970 to 2001). They have met at least twice a season since 1932, without any cancelled games. This is therefore the longest continuously-running rivalry in the NFL.

Green Bay is one of three teams with a winning record against all of their divisional opponents with 100-plus head-to-head games played (along with the Dallas Cowboys and the Kansas City Chiefs). Detroit is one of only two teams with a losing record against all of their divisional opponents with 100-plus head-to-head games played (along with the Los Angeles Chargers). This holds true as of the end of the 2018 season.

Lions–Vikings rivalry

The Lions–Vikings rivalry is an American football rivalry between the Detroit Lions and Minnesota Vikings.The Lions and Vikings have played twice annually since the Vikings entered the league in 1961. The Vikings joined the Lions in the NFL's Western Conference in 1961. The two teams moved to the NFC Central in after the AFL-NFL merger in 1970 and the NFC North after the NFL's 2002 realignment. The Vikings lead the overall series 74–39–2. The two teams have not met in the postseason.

NFC North

The National Football Conference – Northern Division or NFC North is one of the four divisions of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). Nicknamed the "Black & Blue Division" for the rough and tough rivalry games between the teams, it currently has four members: the Chicago Bears, Detroit Lions, Green Bay Packers, and Minnesota Vikings. The NFC North was previously known as the NFC Central from 1970 to 2001. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers were previously members, from 1977, one year after they joined the league as an expansion team, until 2001 when they moved to the NFC South.

The division was created in 1967 as the Central Division of the NFL's Western Conference and existed for three seasons before the AFL–NFL merger. After the merger, it was renamed the NFC Central and retained that name until the NFL split into eight divisions in 2002. The four current division teams have been together in the same division or conference since the Vikings joined the league in 1961. The Bears, Lions and Packers have been in the same division or conference since the NFL began a conference format in 1933. Largely because the four teams have played each other at least twice a year, with the exception of the strike-shortened 1982 season, for more than half a century (more than 80 years in the case of the Bears, Lions and Packers), the entire division is considered one very large rivalry.

Based on the combined ages of its current teams, the NFC North is the oldest division in the NFL, at a combined 344 years old. The Bears are 99 years old (founded in 1919 in Decatur, Illinois; moved to Chicago in 1921), the Packers are also 99 years old (founded in 1919, but turned professional in 1921), the Lions are 89 years old (founded 1929 in Portsmouth, Ohio; moved to Detroit in 1934), and the Vikings are 57 years old (founded 1961). The division has a total of 11 Super Bowl appearances. The Packers have the most appearances in the Super Bowl with 5, the most recent happening at the conclusion of the 2010 season. The Bears and the Packers have the only Super Bowl wins of this division, a total of 5 (4 for the Packers and 1 for the Bears). Of the top 10 NFL teams with the highest winning percentage throughout its franchise history, three of them are in the NFC North (the Bears, the Packers, and the Vikings). The Lions however, have one of the lowest winning percentages in the NFL, including the first winless 16-game season in NFL history, in 2008.Entering 2018 the Bears led the division with an overall record of 752–581–42, victory in Super Bowl XX and eight pre-Super Bowl league titles; Chicago's overall playoff record is 17–18. The Packers hold an overall record of 740–564–38 with an overall playoff record of 34–22, four Super Bowl titles in five Super Bowl appearances, and nine pre-Super Bowl league titles - bringing the Packers to a total of 13 World Championships, currently the most in the NFL. The Lions hold a record of 555–651–32, four league championships, and a 7–13 playoff record. As the youngest (in terms of franchise age) team in the division, the Vikings hold a record of 473–392–11, a playoff record of 20-29, and had won a league title the season before the merger (although they subsequently lost Super Bowl IV).

This division earned the moniker "Black and Blue Division" due to its intense rivalries and physical style of play, and this nickname is still used regularly today. It is also known as the "Frostbite Division" as all teams played home games in late season winter cold until the mid-1970s. The division is also humorously called the "Frozen North", although Detroit has played its home games indoors since 1975, and Minnesota also did so from 1982 to 2013 and returned to indoor home games at U.S. Bank Stadium in 2016. ESPN sportscaster Chris Berman often refers to this division as the "NFC Norris" because of its geographical similarity to the National Hockey League's former Norris Division.

National Football League rivalries

As with all sports leagues, there are a number of significant rivalries in the National Football League (NFL). Rivalries are occasionally created due to a particular event that causes bad blood between teams, players, coaches, or owners, but for the most part, they arise simply due to the frequency with which some teams play each other, and sometimes exist for geographic reasons.

Rivalries in the NFL are commonly recognized as such by fans and players alike. While many rivalries are well established, others are of more recent vintage, accepted as existing by the nature of the competition and history between the two teams. Other rivalries have fallen by the wayside due to league realignment and reduction in frequencies of meetings.

Chicago Bears vs. Detroit Lions Season-by-Season Results

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.