Baseball glove

A baseball glove or mitt is a large leather glove worn by baseball players of the defending team, which assists players in catching and fielding balls hit by a batter or thrown by a teammate.

By convention, the glove is described by the handedness of the intended wearer, rather than the hand on which the glove is worn: a glove that fits on the left hand—used by a right-handed thrower—is called a right-handed (RH) or "right-hand throw" (RHT) glove. Conversely, a left-handed glove (LH or LHT) is worn on the right hand, allowing the player to throw the ball with the left hand.

MAYS THE CATCH
"Right-handed" baseball glove worn on the left hand of center fielder Willie Mays during the 1954 World Series.

History

BidMcPhee3
Bid McPhee simulating playing second base without a glove

Early baseball was a game played without gloves. During the slow transition to gloves, a player who continued to play without one was called a barehanded catcher; this did not refer to the position of catcher, but rather to the practice of catching with bare hands. The earliest glove was not webbed and not particularly well suited for catching but was used more to swat a ball to the ground so that it could be picked up.

Glove patent
An 1885 glove patent

One of the first players believed to use a baseball glove was Doug Allison, a catcher for the Cincinnati Red Stockings, in 1870, due to an injured left hand.[1] The first confirmed glove use was by Charlie Waitt, a St. Louis outfielder and first baseman who, in 1875, donned a pair of flesh-colored gloves. Glove use slowly caught on as more and more players began using different forms of gloves.

Many early baseball gloves were simple leather gloves with the fingertips cut off, supposedly to allow for the same control of a bare hand but with extra padding. First baseman Albert Spalding, originally skeptical of glove use, influenced more infielders to begin using gloves. Spalding later founded the sporting goods company Spalding, which still manufactures baseball gloves along with other sports equipment.[2] By the mid-1890s, it was normal for players to wear gloves in the field.

AdvertisementInfieldersBaseballGlovesSpalding1905
A.G. Spalding & Bros. advertisement for infielder gloves, 1905

In 1920, Bill Doak, a pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals, suggested that a web be placed between the first finger and the thumb in order to create a pocket. This design soon became the standard for baseball gloves. Doak patented his design and sold it to Rawlings. His design became the precursor to modern gloves, and enabled Rawlings to become the preferred glove of professional players.[3]

For many years it was customary for fielders to leave their gloves on the field when their team went in to bat. This practice was prohibited by the major leagues in 1954.[4]

Baseball gloves have grown progressively larger since their inception. While catching in baseball had always been two handed, eventually, gloves grew to a size that made it easier to catch the ball in the webbing of the glove, and use the off-hand to keep it from falling out. A glove is typically worn on the non-dominant hand, leaving the dominant hand for throwing the ball; for example, a right-handed player would wear a glove on the left hand.

The shape and size of the baseball glove is governed by official baseball rules. Section 3.00 - EQUIPMENT AND UNIFORMS specifies glove dimensions and materials in parts 3.04 through 3.07.

Modern Day

The structure and quality of the baseball glove has developed greatly over the past century. Today, the production of baseball gloves is much more precise and efficient. This has greatly increased the usefulness and accessibility of baseball gloves to the general population. Currently, Easton is "experimenting with combining leather and Kevlar (used in bullet-proof vests) in a new ultra-light weight glove line".[2] Manufacturers have also designed new, non-traditional types of gloves to suit non-traditional players. Also, manufacturers are personalizing gloves for high caliber players to help increase their exposure on national television. Even though there have been many advancements in the design and creation of the baseball glove, the greatest came in the invention of the catcher's mitt. However, as a Wake Forest University study demonstrated through 39 minor-league players, even though today's catcher's mitts are state-of-the-art, they still do not offer enough protection from long-term injury to the hand and wrist.

The highest-quality baseball gloves are typically made of heavy leather. These heavy leather gloves usually take more time for the player to break in. These gloves also provide a tighter, more personalized fit for the player. This is an improvement from youth and recreational gloves, which tend to feature palm pads and/or adjustable velcro wrist straps. These gloves take less time to break in or they are pre-broken in, and are less personal and more "one size fits all".

Rolin
A custom made Rolin baseball glove

Varieties

Baseball gloves are measured by starting at the top of the index finger of the glove and measuring down the finger, along the inside of the pocket and then out to the heel of the glove. Gloves typically range in size from 9 inches (youth starter size) to 12.75 inches for adult outfield play.[5] Catcher's mitts, unlike those of other gloves, are measured around the circumference, and they typically have 32- to 34-inch patterns.

The shape and size of a glove is described by its pattern. Modern gloves have become quite specialized, with position-specific patterns:

  • Catcher's mitts are called "mitts" because they lack individual fingers, like mittens. They have extra padding and a hinged, claw-like shape that helps them funnel fastballs into the pocket and provide a good target for pitchers. Some catchers use mitts with phosphorescent paint around the ridges to provide a clearer target for the pitcher. In addition, catcher's mitts come in single hinge and dual hinge varieties. If required to catch a knuckleball, a catcher will typically use an even larger mitt. Some knuckleball catchers have even experimented with using first baseman's mitts, as described below.
  • First baseman's mitts also lack individual fingers. They are generally very long and wide to help them pick or scoop badly thrown balls from infielders. These mitts usually have 12.5- to 12.75-inch patterns, measured from wrist to the tip. Because first basemen are often left-handed, first basemen's mitts are readily available to fit on a right hand. Hank Greenberg is often credited as the first to wear this style of glove in the field.[6] Some catchers, such as Victor Martinez, use a first base mitt while catching knuckleballers. The disadvantage of using a first baseman's mitt in this way is that because first basemen are rarely required to make a quick throw to another base, they tend to make the task of catching base stealers more difficult—a task already complicated by the knuckleball's slow speed and erratic behavior.
  • Infielders' gloves, unlike the first baseman's mitt, tend to be smaller. They have shallow pockets to allow fielders to remove the ball easily in order to make a quick throw to a base. Often the webbing will be open to allow dirt to move through the glove so that the infielder does not pull out a handful of dirt when trying to remove the ball from the glove. Infielder's gloves typically have 11- to 12-inch patterns.
  • Pitchers' gloves usually have a closed, opaque webbing to allow pitchers to conceal their grip on the ball (which, in part, determines the behavior of the pitch in flight) from the batter. Pitcher-specific gloves tend to have 11.75- to 12-inch patterns; some pitchers such as Gio González use gloves with patterns as large as 12.25 inches. Infield gloves with intricate webbing are also used by pitchers.
  • Outfielder's gloves are usually quite long with deep pockets to help with catching fly balls on the run or in a dive and to keep outfielders from having to bend down as far to field a ground ball. These gloves typically have 12- to 12.75-inch patterns, measured from wrist to the tip. They are frequently worn-in differently from those of infielders, with a flatter squeeze rather than the infielder's rounded style.
  • Switch-thrower's gloves are gloves with a second thumb pocket on the opposite side of the glove, to allow it to be worn on either side of the hand. At the major league level, this glove has been used only by switch-pitcher Pat Venditte.
  • Left-hand throw gloves are any of the gloves above, but designed to be worn on the right hand (for left-handed players). Players that utilize the left-hand throw gloves such as Tony Gwynn or Sandy Koufax are most frequently pitchers, first basemen, or outfielders.[7]

Major glove manufacturers

See also

References

  1. ^ "Baseball 'Glove Affairs'". NPR. 4 September 2008. 27 June 2008.
  2. ^ a b Bennett, R. (2006, March 31). Glovology TCS Daily.
  3. ^ Stamp, Jimmy. "The Invention of the Baseball Mitt". www.smithsonianmag.com. Smithsonian.com. Retrieved 27 April 2015.
  4. ^ Feldman, Jay (February 20, 1984). "Of Mice And Mitts, And Of A Rule That Helped To Clean Up Baseball". Sports Illustrated.
  5. ^ Baseball Glove Sizing Charts Archived February 20, 2010, at the Wayback Machine
  6. ^ "Hank Greenberg" by Ralph Berger, The Baseball Biography Project Archived March 29, 2010, at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ "Baseball Glove Features"

External links

Albert Spalding

Albert Goodwill Spalding (September 2, 1849 – September 9, 1915) was an American pitcher, manager, and executive in the early years of professional baseball, and the co-founder of A.G. Spalding sporting goods company. He was born and raised in Byron, Illinois yet graduated from Rockford Central High School in Rockford, Illinois. He played major league baseball between 1871 and 1878. Spalding set a trend when he started wearing a baseball glove.

After his retirement as a player, Spalding remained active with the Chicago White Stockings as president and part-owner. In the 1880s, he took players on the first world tour of baseball. With William Hulbert, Spalding organized the National League. He later called for the commission that investigated the origins of baseball and credited Abner Doubleday with creating the game. He also wrote the first set of official baseball rules.

Betty Jane Cornett

Betty Jane Cornett (November 24, 1932 – March 18, 2006) was an infielder and pitcher who played in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. Listed at 5' 5", 125 lb., she batted and threw right handed.Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Betty Jane Cornett was the youngest of 11 children of Francis T. and Stella (née Bentz) Cornett. She attended St. Ambrose, St. Mary's, Latimer and Allegheny high schools. In her spare time, she went to Cowley Recreation Center on Troy Hill enjoying basketball, softball, swimming and ice skating. As a teenager, she was a member of the Pittsburgh Rockets basketball team, even though her favorite pastime was playing softball. She joined the league in 1950 with the Rockford Peaches.After spring training camp, Rockford decided that Cornett was not ready for the league and sent her to the Springfield Sallies rookie touring team to acquire more experience. In 1951 she was promoted to the Kalamazoo Lassies and was dealt to the Battle Creek Belles before the 1952 season.Originally an infielder, the Belles turned her into a pitcher for a couple of games with little success, as she posted an 11.26 earned run average in eight innings of work. She was best suited for the third base job, but she hit a paltry .147 average in 47 games and Battle Creek did not offer her a contract the next season.″Curly″, as her teammates called her for her drooping hair, still wanted to play, so she had to wait five years to regain her amateur status again. Then she played successfully in Northwest Ohio, West Virginia and Pennsylvania softball leagues until 1970.Cornett also worked for H. J. Heinz Company in Pennsylvania during 24 years, retiring in 1987 after being diagnosed with CREST syndrome. After that, she was invited to several AAGPBL Players Association reunions. The association was largely responsible for the opening of Women in Baseball, a permanent display at the Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum at Cooperstown, New York, which was inaugurated in November 1988.In addition, a photograph of Cornett in her wheelchair is featured at the Western Pennsylvania Sports Museum next to an enlarged copy of her AAGPBL baseball card, while a second-floor display still holds her baseball glove, cap and spikes.Betty Jane Cornett died in 2006 in Reserve, Pennsylvania at the age of 73, following complications from pulmonary disease.

Bill Doak

William Leopold Doak (January 28, 1891 – November 26, 1954) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher who for three teams between 1912 and 1929. He spent portions of 13 seasons with the St. Louis Cardinals. He was nicknamed "Spittin' Bill" because he threw the spitball. He led the National League in earned run average in 1914, and he won 20 games in the 1920 season.

Dorothy Harrell

Dorothy Harrell (February 4, 1924 – September 15, 2011) was a shortstop who played in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. Listed at 5 4", 127 lb., Harrell batted and threw right-handed. After being married she played under the name of Dorothy Doyle.An All-Star Team member in five of her eight seasons, Dorothy Harrell was one of the premier shortstops of All-American Girls Professional Baseball League in its twelve years history. Harrell helped bring four championship titles to the Rockford Peaches, including back-to-back victories from 1947 to 1950, while leading her team in runs batted in several times. A classic slap hitter, she rarely tried to drive the ball and was able to put it in play very often, driving in a career 306 runs to rank 13th on the league's all-time list. Well respected for her keen eye for pitches, she garnered 203 walks and strike out only 95 times in 2,920 at-bats for a very solid 2.14 BB/K ratio.A native of Los Angeles, California, Dorothy Harrell was nicknamed ″Snookie″ by her grandmother when she was born. She had an interesting bloodline. Her father, William D. Harrell, was of Irish, Scottish and Cherokee heritage, while her mother, Catherine Harrell, was of Welsh and German ancestry. She received encouragement early in her life from her mother, a huge baseball fan, who gave her a baseball glove and a uniform for Christmas when she was five years old. Harrell graduated from John C. Fremont High School and played organized softball in the Los Angeles area before marrying in 1943 to Leonard Isbell. She remained married through 1946.Harrell was discovered in 1944 by Bill Allington, former minor league player and then a coach in the California leagues, who was also an active scout for the All-American League. She attended a tryout and made an immediate impact on Allington and her future Peaches teammates. Allington eventually would be named manager for the team in the summer of that year as a replacement for Jack Kloza.Entering her first season as the starting shortstop, Harrell was instrumental part of a solid and durable Rockford infield that included Dorothy Kamenshek at first base, Mildred Deegan at second and Alice Pollitt at third. After two losing seasons the Peaches led the circuit with a 67–43 record in 1945. During the playoffs, Rockford beat the Grand Rapids Chicks in the first round, three to one games, and defeated the Fort Wayne Daisies in the best-of-seven series, four to one games, behind a strong pitching effort from Carolyn Morris (3–0) and the opportune hitting of Kamenshek (6-for-21, .285, two RBI).In 1946 Rockford finished in fourth place (60-52) and disposed of Grand Rapids in the first round, three-to-two games, but lost the finals to the Racine Belles in six games. In the final contest, which ended with a score of 1–0, Morris hurled a no-hitter for nine innings but lost her gem because Rockford failed to score. She was not removed until the bottom of the twelfth inning. On the other hand, Racine ace Joanne Winter won her fourth game of the playoffs (third against Rockford), despite allowing 19 base runners. The scoreless game went into the bottom of fourteen, when Sophie Kurys hit a single off reliever Mildred Deegan; stole second base, and, in the midst of stealing third, saw her teammate Betty Trezza hit a single to right field. Kurys tagged and slid at home plate for the only run of the game.

Harrell earned her first All-Star selection in 1947. Starting that year, she led her team in runs batted during four consecutive seasons, batting a career-high .271 average in 1950, and joining the All-Star squad from 1948 to 1950. Rockford returned to the playoffs in 1948, to start a string of three straight championships.In 1948 Rockford beat Fort Wayne Daisies in the best-of-seven series, four to one games. Helen Nicol won all four playoff games she pitched, including the finale in the championship against Maxine Kline, by a 4–2 score. Throughout the finals Harrell was the best hitter, leading all players with a .432 average (7-for-17).In 1949, Harrell married David Doyle and played the rest of her career under her married name, Dorothy Doyle. Her husband died in 1963, and she never remarried.Meanwhile, Rockford continued their torrid pace in 1949, sweeping their longtime rival South Bend Blue Sox in the best-of-seven final series.

The defending champion Peaches won again in 1950, this time beating Fort Wayne in the maximum seven games. Notably, the Peaches and the Blue Sox were the only original teams to be active through the 12 years of existence of the circuit. South Bend would break the championship run of Rockford in 1951. In 58 postseason games, Dorothy batted an average of .281 (61-for-217) with four doubles, two triples and 15 stolen bases, driving in 21 runs while scoring 18 times.In 1951 Dorothy played with the Phoenix A-1 Queens in an Arizona independent league. She rejoined the Peaches in 1952, earning her fifth All-Star berth during what turned out to be her last AAGPBL season. After that she returned to the Queens for the 1953 and 1954 seasons, and also played for the Orange Linoettes fastpitch softball team of California from 1956 to 1960, participating in Major National Tournaments.Harrell graduated from Long Beach State University in 1958, earning her bachelor's degree after earning an associate degree from El Camino Junior College. Following her baseball retirement, she taught mathematics and worked as counselor and physical education teacher at Compton Unified School District in the Los Angeles area, retiring in 1984 after 26 years of service.After retiring, she joined the Golden Diamonds Girls, a group of former AAGPBL players who made frequent appearances at reunions, card shows and sign autographs. She also became an avid golfer and remained close friends with her infield teammates Deegan, Kamenshek and Pollitt.Since 1988 Dorothy Harrell Doyle is part of Women in Baseball, a permanent display based at the Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York, which was unveiled to honor the entire All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. She is also featured as one of the best shortstops to ever play the game with a 10-foot banner hanging at Safeco Field in Seattle, in between Roberto Clemente and Brooks Robinson banners.She was a longtime resident of Cathedral City, California, where she died at the age of 87.

Frank Thomas' Big Hurt

Frank Thomas' Big Hurt is a pinball machine designed by Bill Parker and released by Gottlieb in 1995. The game features a baseball theme and is named after Frank Thomas.

Glove (ice hockey)

There are three styles of gloves worn by ice hockey players. Skaters wear similar gloves on each hand, while goaltenders wear gloves of different types on each hand.

Gord Bamford discography

Gord Bamford is a Canadian country music artist. His discography comprises eight studio albums and thirty-nine singles. He has accumulated seventeen top ten hits on the Canada Country airplay chart, including two number one singles.

Julie Croteau

Julie Croteau is recognized as the first woman to play men's NCAA baseball, as well as the first woman to coach men's NCAA Division I baseball. She is one of two women to ever play in a Major League Baseball-sanctioned winter league, and her baseball glove and photo are on permanent display at the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York.

Lacrosse glove

Lacrosse gloves are heavily padded, protective gloves worn by men's lacrosse players. The gloves are designed to protect players' hands, wrists, and forearms from checks, or legal defensive hitting common in the sport. Gloves consist of thick padding on the back of the hand and forearm covered in leather or canvas material, and a palm area made of synthetic and mesh material. A goaltender's gloves may have extra padding for the thumb to protect against injury from shots. While NCAA collegiate rules require that men's gloves have palms covered, other leagues, including post-collegiate club lacrosse, the National Lacrosse League, Major League Lacrosse, and international play, permit players to cut out the palm area for greater grip and control of the lacrosse stick.

Women's lacrosse rules do not require glove use, except for goalies since hitting is not permitted, but some players use smaller gloves for increased grip and minor protection from incidental contact.

List of Gold Glove Award winners at second base

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985 and 2007), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in the entire league; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.Roberto Alomar leads second basemen in wins; he won 10 Gold Gloves in 11 years with three different American League teams. Ryne Sandberg has the second-highest total overall; his nine awards, all won with the Chicago Cubs, are the most by a National League player. Bill Mazeroski and Frank White are tied for the third-highest total, with eight wins. Mazeroski's were won with the Pittsburgh Pirates, and White won his with the Kansas City Royals. Joe Morgan and Bobby Richardson each won five Gold Glove Awards, and four-time winners include Craig Biggio (who won after converting to second base from catcher), Bret Boone, Bobby Grich, and Dustin Pedroia. Hall of Famers who won Gold Gloves at second base include Alomar, Sandberg, Mazeroski, Morgan, and Nellie Fox.Only one winning second baseman has had an errorless season; Plácido Polanco set a record among winners by becoming the first to post a season with no errors and, therefore, a 1.000 fielding percentage. The best mark in the National League was set by Sandberg in 1991, his final winning season. He committed four errors and amassed a .995 fielding percentage. Grich has made the most putouts in a season, with 484 in 1974. Fox made 453 putouts and the same number of assists in the award's inaugural season; this is more putouts than any National League player has achieved. Morgan set the National League mark, with 417 in 1973. Sandberg's 571 assists in 1983 are the most among winners in the major leagues; the American League leader is Grich, who made 509 in 1973. Mazeroski turned the most double plays by a winner, collecting 161 in 1966. The American League leader is Fox (141 double plays in 1957).

List of Gold Glove Award winners at shortstop

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985, 2007, and 2018), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in the entire league; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.Ozzie Smith, known as "the Wizard of Oz", has won the most Gold Glove Awards at shortstop; he captured 13 awards in his 19 seasons with the St. Louis Cardinals. Omar Vizquel is second among shortstops with 11 wins; he won two with the San Francisco Giants in the National League after winning nine with the Seattle Mariners and the Cleveland Indians in the American League. Luis Aparicio won nine times at shortstop for the third-highest total, followed by Mark Belanger with eight wins. Dave Concepción and Derek Jeter have won five awards; four-time winners at shortstop include Tony Fernández and Alan Trammell. Hall of Famers who have won Gold Glove Awards at shortstop include Smith, Aparicio, Ernie Banks, Robin Yount, Barry Larkin and Cal Ripken, Jr., whose 2,632 consecutive games played earned him his "Iron Man" nickname.Vizquel made the fewest errors during a shortstop's winning season, with three in 2000; his .995 fielding percentage that season leads American League and major league shortstops, and his 2006 total of four errors is tied for the National League lead with Rey Ordóñez (1999). Ordóñez' .994 fielding percentage in 1999 leads National Leaguers in that category. Aparicio leads winners in putouts, with 305 in 1960; Concepción (1976) and Smith (1983) are tied for the National League lead with 304. Smith's 621 assists are best among all shortstops, and Belanger (552 assists in 1974) is the American League leader. Gene Alley turned 128 double plays in 1966 to lead winners in that category; Ripken leads American Leaguers, with 119 turned in 1992.

List of Gold Glove Award winners at third base

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985, 2007 and 2018), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in the entire league; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.Brooks Robinson won 16 Gold Gloves with the Baltimore Orioles, leading both the American League and all third basemen in awards won. Mike Schmidt is second in wins at third base; he won 10 with the Philadelphia Phillies and leads National League third basemen in Gold Gloves. Scott Rolen has the third-highest total, winning eight awards with the Phillies, the St. Louis Cardinals, and the Cincinnati Reds. Six-time winners at third base are Buddy Bell, Nolan Arenado, Eric Chavez, and Robin Ventura. Ken Boyer, Doug Rader, and Ron Santo have each won five Gold Gloves at third base, and four-time winners include Adrián Beltré, Gary Gaetti, and Matt Williams. Hall of Famers who have won a Gold Glove at the position include Robinson, Schmidt, Santo, Wade Boggs, and George Brett.The fewest errors committed in a third baseman's winning season is five, achieved by Boggs in 1995 and Chavez in 2006. Two National League winners have made six errors in a season to lead that league: Mike Lowell in 2005, and Schmidt in 1986. Chavez' fielding percentage of .987 in 2006 leads all winners; Lowell leads the National League with his .983 mark. Robinson leads all winners with 410 assists in 1974, and made the most putouts in the American League (174 in 1966). The most putouts by a winner was 187, made by Santo in 1967. Schmidt leads the National League in assists, with 396 in 1977. The most double plays turned in a season was 44 by Robinson in 1974; he turned at least 40 double plays during three of his winning seasons. The National League leader is Nolan Arenado with 42 in 2015Ken Boyer and Clete Boyer are the only pair of brothers to have won Gold Glove Awards at third base. Older brother Ken won five Gold Gloves in six years with the Cardinals (1958–1961, 1963), and Clete won in 1969 with the Atlanta Braves.

Nocona Athletic Goods Company

Nokona Athletic Goods Company (originally known as Nocona Leather Goods Company and stylized as Nokona) was founded in 1926 by the Storey family in Nocona, Texas. In 1934, The Nokona baseball glove was trademarked (spelled with a "k" when the United States Patent and Trademark Office would not allow the name of an incorporated town to be registered). Today, Nocona Athletic Goods is one of a handful of companies that still manufacture baseball gloves in the United States.

Nocona Athletic Goods outfits slow pitch softball players all the way to professional baseball players with hand stitched and laced ball gloves. The company offers glove repair when a customer notices unusual wear and tear. Numerous major league professionals endorse the Nokona brand of glove. The company also produces many other types of athletic equipment, including football pads and helmets.

Rawlings Gold Glove Award

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as simply the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. It is also awarded to women fastpitch softball players in the National Pro Fastpitch as of 2016. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Additionally, a sabermetric component provided by Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) accounts for approximately 25 percent of the vote. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985, 2007, and 2018), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in Major League Baseball; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.

Save (goaltender)

In several sports with goalkeepers or goaltenders protecting nets or goals, a save is credited to a goaltender that stops the playing object from entering the goal. These sports include football, ice hockey, and lacrosse, among others.

In ice hockey, a goaltender is credited with a save when they prevent a shot by the opponent from entering the net. A goaltender's efficiency in stopping shots, the save percentage, is calculated as a percentage of shots stopped divided by the total number of shots on goal. If a goaltender makes all the saves within a game it is called a shutout. In association football this is called a clean sheet.

An ice hockey goaltender can use any part of their body to make a save. Typically goaltending equipment worn aids the goaltender in stopping the puck. An ice hockey goaltender typically wears two leg pads, a blocker, a glove, a chest protector, a helmet which is sometimes referred to as a mask as well as other ice hockey equipment.

A kick or a pad save is one where the goaltender uses their leg pads which are strapped to the legs to kick out and stop the puck from entering the net. These pads cover from the goaltenders feet all the way to their thighs. This kind of save is most useful against low shots where the goaltender is using the butterfly style. Commonly these type of saves will result in a rebound, allowing another player the opportunity to possess the puck after a shot. Pad saves were typically the most common type of save, especially before the creation of the butterfly style.

A glove save is a save made where the goaltender catches the puck in their glove. The goaltending glove is typically worn on the "weak" hand of an individual, much like a baseball glove. The goaltender uses their glove to snatch shots out of the air. These saves sometimes be quite dramatic as they can be quite exciting to see. Sometimes a glove save is seen as a "last resort" to keeping a puck out of the net.

A blocker save is one in which the goaltender uses a hard rectangular "block" which rests on the forearm of the persons "strong" hand. The blocker is worn on the same arm that which holds the goaltending stick. A blocker save is made when the goaltender uses the hard rectangular surface to deflect a shot away from the goal. This along with glove saves are two high skill abilities for a goaltender to be able to perform.

A final type of save is called the stick save. Like its name suggests it is a save made using the goaltending stick. The stick save is usually one of desperation or luck. A goaltender would rather use another part of their body to stop the puck but occasionally the stick can be used. A stick save will usually come as a goaltender desperately tries diving back into position to deflect the puck away from the goal.

Goaltenders also can freeze play by catching and swallowing up a shot that hits them and gets caught up in their chest protector. There is no official name for this kind of save.

At the end of the NHL season the Vezina Trophy is given to the goaltender that is "adjudged to be the best at his position" which often times is the goaltender with a very high save percentage (SV%) and a very low goals against average (GAA). The current holder of the Vezina Trophy is Pekka Rinne of the Nashville Predators.

In association football, a goalkeeper who does not concede any goals during a match is said to have "kept" a clean sheet. In certain competitions awards (such as the Premier League Golden Glove and the Football League Golden Glove) are given for the player who keeps the most clean sheets during the season or the tournament.

The Catch (baseball)

The Catch refers to a defensive play made by New York Giants center fielder Willie Mays on a ball hit by Cleveland Indians batter Vic Wertz on September 29, 1954, during Game 1 of the 1954 World Series at the Polo Grounds in Upper Manhattan, New York City.

The Rookie (painting)

The Rookie or The Rookie (Red Sox Locker Room) is a 1957 painting by American artist Norman Rockwell, painted for the March 2, 1957, cover of The Saturday Evening Post magazine.The painting depicts several Boston Red Sox baseball players in a locker room, joined by an apparent new player who is dressed in street clothes and carrying a suitcase, along with his baseball glove and baseball bat. The painting was sold in a 2014 auction for over twenty million dollars.

Trapper (ice hockey)

A trapper, also referred to as catch glove or simply glove, is a piece of equipment that an ice hockey goaltender wears on the non-dominant hand to assist in catching and stopping the puck.

Wilson Defensive Player of the Year Award

The Wilson Defensive Player of the Year Award is awarded annually to the best defensive player at each fielding position in Major League Baseball. One overall Defensive Player of the Year is also selected each year. Unlike the Rawlings Gold Glove Awards, which are voted on by major league managers and coaches, the Wilson Defensive Player of the Year Award winners are determined by statistics using sabermetrics. In 2012, the baseball glove manufacturer Wilson created the Defensive Player of the Year Award to honor the best defensive player on each team in Major League Baseball. One award winner was selected from each league as that league's overall Defensive Player of the Year. Starting in 2014, the awards are given to the best defensive player at each position, regardless of league, and the overall award is given to only one player, regardless of league. Also in 2014, a new award was created for the best Defensive Team of the Year, regardless of league.

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