Baseball America

Baseball America is a sports magazine that covers baseball at every level, with a particular focus on up-and-coming players in high school, college, Japan, and the minor leagues. It is currently published in the form of a bi-weekly newspaper, five annual reference book titles, a weekly podcast, and a website. It also regularly produces lists of the top prospects in the sport, and covers aspects of the game from a scouting and player-development point of view. The publication's motto is "Baseball news you can't find anywhere else."

Baseball America
CategoriesSports
Frequency26 per year
Year founded1981
CompanyBaseball America Enterprises
CountryUnited States
Based inDurham, North Carolina
LanguageEnglish
WebsiteBaseballAmerica.com
ISSN0745-5372

History

Baseball America was founded in 1981 and has since grown into a full-service media company. Founder Allan Simpson began writing the magazine from Canada, originally calling it the All-America Baseball News. By 1983, Simpson moved the magazine to Durham, North Carolina, after it was purchased by then-Durham Bulls owner Miles Wolff. Simpson left his position at the magazine in 2006.

Source Interlink (later TEN: The Enthusiast Network and the Motor Trend Group) purchased Baseball America in December 2011 and sold the publication in February 2017. The new Baseball America Enterprises includes Gary Green and Larry Botel of Alliance Baseball, owners of minor league franchises in Omaha, Neb., and Richmond, Va., in partnership with David Geaslen, founder and CEO of 3STEP Sports.[1] Today, Baseball America is led by publisher BJ Schecter. It also uses out-of-office correspondents.

Content

Baseball America is published bi-weekly in print and on the web. Every issue features coverage of the majors, minors, baseball's draft, college and high school baseball. Other features include reviews and analysis of prospects as well as tracking the progress of the best players in amateur baseball and the minors.[2]

Other annual publications produced by the company include Baseball America Almanac, Baseball America Prospect Handbook (a New York Times sports best-seller in March 2016), Baseball America Directory and the Super Register. Baseball America also has an active social media presence on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram, bringing its scouting and player-development point of view to 21st century media platforms.

All-Star Futures Game

Baseball America helps MLB select the players for the All-Star Futures Game.

Major League Baseball awards

See footnote[3]

Baseball America All-Rookie Team

Note: Each year's team consists of a varying number of pitchers and types of pitchers.
  • 2007
  • 2008
  • 2009 (a catcher, 4 infielders, 3 outfielders, one DH, and 5 pitchers)[4]
  • 2010 (a catcher, 4 infielders, 3 outfielders, one DH, 5 starting pitchers, 2 relief pitchers, and one closer)[5]
  • 2011 (a catcher, 4 infielders, 3 outfielders, one DH, 5 starting pitchers, 2 relief pitchers, and one closer)[6]

Baseball America Manager of the Year

Baseball America Major League Coach of the Year

See footnote[13]

Baseball America Major League Executive of the Year

See footnote[14]

Baseball America Roland Hemond Award

See footnote[27]

Baseball America Lifetime Achievement Award

See footnote[28]

Baseball America Organization of the Year

The "Organization of the Year" award was first presented in 1982.[29][30]

Minor League Baseball awards

See footnote[3]
  • Baseball America Minor League Player of the Year Award
  • Baseball America Independent Leagues Player of the Year[43]
  • Baseball America Minor League All-Star Team[3] (First team and Second team)[44]
  • Baseball America Triple-A Classification All-Star Team[45]
  • Baseball America Double-A Classification All-Star Team[46]
  • Baseball America High Class A Classification All-Star Team[47]
  • Baseball America Low Class A Classification All-Star Team[48]
  • Baseball America Rookie-Level Classification All-Star Team[49]
  • Baseball America Dominican Summer League Classification All-Star Team[50]
  • Baseball America Short-Season Classification All-Star Team[51]
  • Baseball America Minor League Manager of the Year[3]
  • Baseball America Minor League Team of the Year[52]
  • Baseball America Minor League Executive of the Year[53]
  • Baseball America Bob Freitas Awards (for outstanding minor-league operations at Triple-A, Double-A, Class A, and short-season) (first awarded in 1989)[54][55]
  • Baseball America Independent Organization of the Year (first awarded in 2006)[56]

College baseball awards

See footnote[3]

In addition to the awards below, Baseball America releases rankings of the top 25 teams in the nation, as voted by its staff. A preseason poll is compiled, in addition to a weekly poll during the season.

High-school baseball awards

See footnote[3]

Best baseball books

  • 2010 – The Last Boy: Mickey Mantle and the End of America's Childhood; by Jane Leavy (HarperCollins)[70]

See also

Footnotes

  1. ^ "Baseball America Sold | SGB Online". Retrieved 2019-03-14.
  2. ^ "Baseball America Media". Retrieved 2012-09-17.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Baseball America award winners. Includes MAJOR LEAGUES: Player of the Year (1998 to date), Rookie of the Year (1989 to date), Organization of the Year (1982 to date), Executive of the Year (1998 to date), Manager of the Year (1998 to date). MINOR LEAGUES: Player of the Year (1981 to date), Executive of the Year (2002 to date), Manager of the Year (1989 to date), Team of the Year (1993 to date). FREITAS AWARDS (top organizations in Triple A, Double A, Class A, Sort-Season). INDEPENDENT LEAGUES: Player of the Year (1996 to date). COLLEGE: Player of the Year (1981 to date), Coach of the Year (1981 to date), Assistant Coach of the Year (1999 to date), Freshman of the Year (1982 to date), Summer College Player of the Year (1984 to date). HIGH SCHOOL: Player of the Year (1992 to date), Youth Player of the Year (2002 to date), Team of the Year (1992 to date). Retrieved 2016-11-15.
  4. ^ "2009 All-Rookie Team: The 2009 rookie team as selected by Baseball America". Baseball America. October 28, 2009. Retrieved 2011-12-09.
  5. ^ Eddy, Matt (October 19, 2010). "Future Big League Stars Highlight All-Rookie Team". Baseball America. Archived from the original on 25 October 2010. Retrieved 2010-11-02.
  6. ^ Eddy, Matt (October 21, 2011). "Infield, Pitching Staff Highlight 2011 Rookie Team". Baseball America. Retrieved 2011-11-08.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p "Baseball America Awards". Baseball America. Retrieved 2014-03-10.
  8. ^ Majors: Awards: Manager Of The Year. Baseball America, Inc. Retrieved 2011-04-16.
  9. ^ "Major League Manager of the Year: Clint Hurdle". baseballamerica.com. Retrieved 17 March 2018.
  10. ^ "MLB Manager Of The Year: Buck Showalter". baseballamerica.com. Retrieved 17 March 2018.
  11. ^ http://www.baseballamerica.com/ba-awards-gala/terry-francona-nearly-put-indians-top/#CIiqkRJhSsPVHe68.97
  12. ^ Young, Matt (29 November 2017). "Astros' A.J. Hinch named Manager of Year by Baseball America". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved 2 July 2018.
  13. ^ Majors: Awards: Coach Of The Year. Baseball America, Inc. Retrieved 2010-09-26.
  14. ^ Majors: Awards: Executive Of The Year. Baseball America, Inc. Retrieved 2010-09-26. See also: The Sporting News Executive of the Year Award.
  15. ^ Morosi, Jon Paul (Detroit Free Press) (December 18, 2006). "Major League Executive Of The Year: Dave Dombrowski: Dombrowski molds Tigers into AL contenders". Baseball America. Retrieved September 26, 2010.
  16. ^ Haudricourt, Tom (December 3, 2007). "Zduriencik Named Top Executive: Brewers return as contenders". Baseball America. Retrieved September 26, 2010.
  17. ^ Speier, Alex (December 22, 2008). "Setting Up Success: Epstein is our Major League Exec of the Year". Baseball America. Retrieved September 26, 2010.
  18. ^ Ringolsby, Tracy (December 23, 2009). "Major League Executive Of The Year: Dan O'Dowd has built the Rockies for long-term success". Baseball America. Retrieved September 26, 2010.
  19. ^ Grant, Evan (December 8, 2010). "2010 Major League Executive Of The Year". Baseball America. Retrieved May 19, 2011.
  20. ^ Haudricourt, Tom (December 6, 2011). "2011 Major League Executive Of The Year: Doug Melvin: Melvin makes all the right moves for Brewers". Baseball America. Retrieved 2011-12-09.
  21. ^ "Major League Executive Of The Year: Brian Sabean". baseballamerica.com. Retrieved 17 March 2018.
  22. ^ "Executive of the Year: Oakland's Billy Beane". baseballamerica.com. Retrieved 17 March 2018.
  23. ^ "Major League Executive Of The Year: Duquette Puts Pieces Together". baseballamerica.com. Retrieved 17 March 2018.
  24. ^ "Major League Executive Of The Year: Sandy Alderson". baseballamerica.com. Retrieved 17 March 2018.
  25. ^ https://www.baseballamerica.com/majors/2017-mlb-executive-of-the-year-yankees-gm-brian-cashman/#eb4tlwG0PeFgXzc4.97
  26. ^ Remillard, Calli (November 27, 2018). "Dave Dombrowski was named Executive of the Year". Boston.com. Retrieved November 27, 2018.
  27. ^ The Roland Hemond Award is given long-term contributions to scouting and player development. Majors: Awards: Roland Hemond Award. Baseball America, Inc. Retrieved 2010-09-26. See also: Category:Major League Baseball farm directors and Category:Major League Baseball scouting directors.
  28. ^ Majors: Awards: Lifetime Achievement Award. Baseball America, Inc. Retrieved 2010-09-26.
  29. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y Organization of the Year Award. Baseball-Almanac. Retrieved 2011-08-18.
  30. ^ Majors: Awards: Organization Of The Year. Baseball America, Inc. Retrieved 2010-09-26.
  31. ^ Kline, Chris (December 14, 2006). "Organization Of The Year: Los Angeles Dodgers: Dodgers inject impact talent from within". Baseball America. Retrieved September 26, 2010.
  32. ^ Ringolsby, Tracy (December 6, 2007). "Organization Of The Year: Rockies Ride Winning Streak To The World Series". Baseball America. Retrieved September 26, 2010.
  33. ^ Topkin, Marc (December 22, 2008). "Built To Last: Our Organization of the Year should have staying power". Baseball America. Retrieved September 26, 2010.
  34. ^ Salisbury, Jim (December 7, 2009). "Organization Of The Year: Philadelphia Phillies: Philadelphia completes an amazing turnaround". Baseball America. Retrieved September 26, 2010.
  35. ^ Crasnick, Jerry (December 8, 2010). "2010 Major League Organization Of The Year". Baseball America. Retrieved May 19, 2011.
  36. ^ Goold, Derrick (December 5, 2011). "2011 Organization Of The Year: St. Louis Cardinals: Cards' unlikely surge reflects winning plan". Baseball America. Retrieved 2011-12-09.
  37. ^ "2012 Organization Of The Year: Cincinnati Reds". baseballamerica.com. Retrieved 17 March 2018.
  38. ^ "Organization of the Year: St. Louis Cardinals". baseballamerica.com. Retrieved 17 March 2018.
  39. ^ "Organization Of The Year: In K.C., Patience Finally Pays". baseballamerica.com. Retrieved 17 March 2018.
  40. ^ Sawchik, Travis (November 30, 2015). "Organization of the Year: Pirates Prove Building a Team Takes Blending". Baseball America. Retrieved 2016-10-28.
  41. ^ Glaser, Kyle (November 28, 2016). "2016 Organization of the Year: Cubs Build From Ground Up To Title". Baseball America. Retrieved 2016-12-03.
  42. ^ Glaser, Kyle (November 28, 2017). "2017 MLB Organization Of The Year: Los Angeles Dodgers". Baseball America. Retrieved November 29, 2017.
  43. ^ Cooper, J.J. (October 7, 2009). "Worth Sticking Around: Greg Porter is the 2009 Independent Leagues Player of the Year". Baseball America, Inc. Retrieved September 21, 2010.
  44. ^ Glaser, Kyle (September 8, 2017). "2017 Minor League All-Star Team: Precocious Young Hitters Lead The Way". BaseballAmerica.com. Baseball America Enterprises. Retrieved 2017-09-09.
  45. ^ "2017 Triple-A Classification All-Star Team". BaseballAmerica.com. Baseball America Enterprises. September 11, 2017. Retrieved 2017-09-19.
  46. ^ "2017 Double-A Classification All-Star Team". BaseballAmerica.com. Baseball America Enterprises. September 11, 2017. Retrieved 2017-09-19.
  47. ^ "2017 High Class A Classification All-Star Team". BaseballAmerica.com. Baseball America Enterprises. September 11, 2017. Retrieved 2017-09-19.
  48. ^ "2017 Low Class A Classification All-Star Team". BaseballAmerica.com. Baseball America Enterprises. September 12, 2017. Retrieved 2017-09-19.
  49. ^ "2017 Rookie-Level Classification All-Star Team". BaseballAmerica.com. Baseball America Enterprises. September 12, 2017. Retrieved 2017-09-19.
  50. ^ "2017 Dominican Summer League Classification All-Star Team". BaseballAmerica.com. Baseball America Enterprises. September 12, 2017. Retrieved 2017-09-19.
  51. ^ "2017 Short-Season Classification All-Star Team". BaseballAmerica.com. Baseball America Enterprises. September 12, 2017. Retrieved 2017-09-19.
  52. ^ Baseball America Minor League Team of the Year webpage
  53. ^ Baseball America Minor League Executive of the Year webpage
  54. ^ Baseball America Bob Freitas Awards webpage
  55. ^ Lingo, Will. "Freitas Awards Try To Spotlight Minors Top Operators", Baseball America, Nov. 9, 2006
  56. ^ Baseball America Independent Organization of the Year webpage
  57. ^ College: Awards: Player Of The Year webpage. Baseball America, Inc. Retrieved 2010-09-21.
  58. ^ College: Awards: All-America Teams webpage. Baseball America, Inc. Retrieved 2010-09-21.
  59. ^ College: Awards: Freshman Of The Year webpage. Baseball America, Inc. Retrieved 2010-09-21.
  60. ^ College: Awards: Freshman All-America Team webpage. Baseball America, Inc. Retrieved 2010-09-21.
  61. ^ Summer College Player of the Year (Baseball America Awards webpage). Baseball America, Inc. Retrieved 2010-12-30.
  62. ^ College: Awards: Coach Of The Year webpage. Baseball America, Inc. Retrieved 2010-09-21.
  63. ^ College: Awards: Assistant Coach Of The Year webpage. Baseball America, Inc. Retrieved 2010-09-21.
  64. ^ ABCA/Baseball America Assistant Coach of the Year. American Baseball Coaches Association website. Retrieved on 2016-12-02.
  65. ^ (Evan Harley )High School: Awards: Player Of The Year webpage. Baseball America, Inc. Retrieved 2010-09-21.
  66. ^ High School: Awards: Team Of The Year webpage. Baseball America, Inc. Retrieved 2010-09-21.
  67. ^ High School: Awards: All-America Teams webpage. Baseball America, Inc. Retrieved 2010-09-21.
  68. ^ High School: Awards: Youth Player Of The Year webpage. Baseball America, Inc. Retrieved 2010-09-21.
  69. ^ High School: Awards: Youth Coach Of The Year webpage. Baseball America, Inc. Retrieved 2010-09-21.
  70. ^ Bailey, James (December 16, 2010). "The Best Baseball Books Of 2010". Baseball America Inc. Retrieved December 31, 2010.

External links

Addison Russell

Addison Wayne Russell (born January 23, 1994) is an American professional baseball shortstop for the Chicago Cubs of Major League Baseball (MLB). In 2015, Baseball America listed Russell as the third-best prospect in professional baseball. He made his MLB debut in April 2015 and was an All-Star in 2016.

Atlanta Braves award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Atlanta Braves professional baseball franchise, including its years in Boston (1871–1952) and Milwaukee (1953–1965).

Baseball America College Coach of the Year

The Baseball America College Coach of the Year Award is an award given by Baseball America to the best college baseball coach of the year. The award has been given annually since 1981.

Baseball America College Player of the Year Award

The Baseball America College Player of the Year Award is an award given by Baseball America to the best college baseball player of the year. The award has been given annually since 1981.

Baseball America Minor League Player of the Year Award

Listed below in chronological order are the Minor League Baseball players chosen by Baseball America as recipients of the Baseball America Minor League Player of the Year Award. Since 1981 the award is given to a single minor league player and is judged by Baseball America panel experts as having had the most outstanding season.

Baseball awards

Professional baseball leagues, amateur-baseball organizations, sportswriting associations, and other groups confer awards on various baseball teams, players, managers, coaches, executives, broadcasters, writers, and other baseball-related people for excellence in achievement, sportsmanship, and community involvement.

General manager (baseball)

In Major League Baseball, the general manager (GM) of a team typically controls player transactions and bears the primary responsibility on behalf of the ballclub during contract discussions with players.

The general manager is also normally the person who hires and fires the coaching staff, including the field manager who acts as the head coach. In baseball, the term manager used without qualification almost always refers to the field manager, not the general manager.

Before the 1960s, and in some rare cases today, a person with the general manager title in sports has also borne responsibility for the non-player operations of the ballclub, such as ballpark administration and broadcasting. Ed Barrow, George Weiss and Gabe Paul were three baseball GMs noted for their administrative skills in both player and non-player duties.

Gregg Jefferies

Gregory Scott Jefferies (born August 1, 1967) is a retired infielder/outfielder in Major League Baseball who had a 14-year career from 1987 to 2000. He was a highly touted prospect who became the first two-time winner of the Baseball America Minor League Player of the Year Award. In 2017, Baseball America called them their most highly regarded prospect until Andruw Jones. He went on to become a two-time All-Star.

Jason Heyward

Jason Alias Heyward (born August 9, 1989), nicknamed "J-Hey" is an American professional baseball right fielder for the Chicago Cubs of Major League Baseball (MLB). Originally the Atlanta Braves' first-round selection in the 2007 MLB draft from Henry County High School in Georgia, he began his minor league career at age 17. Heyward soon became one of the top-rated prospects in all of baseball for batting, speed, and defense, and debuted in MLB as Atlanta's starting right fielder on Opening Day 2010. There, he played until being traded to the St. Louis Cardinals after the 2014 season. Standing 6 feet 5 inches (1.96 m) tall and weighing 245 pounds (111 kg), he throws and bats left-handed. He has worn uniform No. 22 throughout his major league career in honor of a high school friend and teammate who died in a traffic collision.

A three-time minor league All-Star game selection, Baseball America selected Heyward as the Braves' top overall prospect in 2007 and the organization's best power hitter; it cited Heyward as having the best strike zone discipline and excelling at multiple other skills. In 2009, he won a Minor League Player of the Year Award from both Baseball America and USA Today. That year, he batted .323 with 17 home runs (HR), 63 runs batted in (RBI), a .408 on-base percentage, and a .555 slugging percentage over 99 games. A consensus number-one MLB prospect entering the 2010 season, Baseball America, Keith Law of ESPN.com, and Jonathan Mayo of MLB.com all listed Heyward as baseball's top prospect.After making his MLB debut for Atlanta in 2010, Heyward was named to the National League (NL) All-Star team and finished second in the NL Rookie of the Year Award. Baseball America named him their MLB Rookie of the Year. Injuries limited his playing time in 2011 and 2013. With a breakout season in 2012, he hit 27 home runs with 82 RBI and 21 stolen bases while finishing tenth in the NL in runs scored with 93. Also recognized for his defense including coverage in the deepest parts of right field, he won both the Fielding Bible and NL Gold Glove Awards for right fielders in 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017 and Wilson's MLB Defensive Player of the Year in 2014. He is widely regarded as one of the best outfield defenders in baseball.

Jason Kipnis

Jason Michael Kipnis (born April 3, 1987; nicknamed "Kip") is an American professional baseball second baseman and center fielder for the Cleveland Indians of Major League Baseball (MLB). He attended Glenbrook North High School in the suburbs of Chicago, where he earned three letters playing baseball for the Glenbrook North Spartans. He attended the University of Kentucky, but transferred to Arizona State University after two years. In college, Kipnis was an All-American and the 2009 Pacific-10 Conference Player of the Year for the Sun Devils.

The Indians selected Kipnis in the second round of the 2009 Major League Baseball draft. In 2010, he was named the Indians' Minor League Player of the Year, and a Baseball America Minor League All Star. Prior to the 2011 season, Baseball Prospectus ranked him as the top Indians prospect and the 28th-highest prospect in baseball. At mid-season, Baseball America rated him as baseball's 31st-best prospect. He was called up from the minor leagues on July 22, 2011. In 2012, he became the starting second baseman for the Indians.

Joc Pederson

Joc Russell Pederson ( PEE-dər-sən; born April 21, 1992) is an American professional baseball outfielder for the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball (MLB). Pederson was drafted by the Dodgers in the 11th round of the 2010 MLB Draft, out of Palo Alto High School. His father, Stu Pederson, played for the Dodgers in 1985.

In 2011, he hit .353 while leading the Pioneer League in RBIs and outfield assists, and was both a Pioneer League and Rookie League All Star. In 2012, he was named the Dodgers' "Minor League Player of the Year". By virtue of his Jewish heritage, he played for the Israel national baseball team in the qualifying rounds of the 2013 World Baseball Classic.

In 2013, Pederson was both a mid-season and postseason Southern League All-Star, and led the league in slugging percentage. He was ranked the Dodgers' # 1 prospect by Baseball America after the 2013 season. In 2014, he became the first player in the Pacific Coast League (PCL) in 80 years, and the fourth all-time, to hit 30 homers and steal 30 bases in the same season. That year Pederson led the PCL in runs, home runs, walks, on-base percentage, and OPS, while stealing 30 bases. He was named the PCL Most Valuable Player, to both the mid-season and postseason PCL All-Star teams, and was selected as Baseball America's AAA Player of the Year. In 2015, he was named the 8th-best prospect in baseball by Baseball America.

He began the 2015 season as the Dodgers' starting center fielder, and the third-youngest player in the NL. Pederson was selected to the NL team in the 2015 Major League Baseball All-Star Game, and was chosen to start in left field. He made it to the final round of the 2015 Major League Baseball Home Run Derby, but lost to Cincinnati Reds third baseman Todd Frazier. In 2017, he set a record with a hit and a run scored in each of his first six World Series games.

Kris Bryant

Kristopher Lee Bryant (born January 4, 1992) is an American professional baseball third baseman for the Chicago Cubs of Major League Baseball (MLB). Prior to playing professionally, Bryant attended the University of San Diego, where he played college baseball for the Toreros.

Bryant starred in baseball for Bonanza High School. In college, he was named an All-American in 2012 and 2013, and won the Dick Howser Trophy and Golden Spikes Award in 2013. The Cubs selected him with the second overall selection in the 2013 MLB draft and he quickly became one of the top prospects in baseball, winning the USA Today Minor League Player of the Year Award and Baseball America Minor League Player of the Year Award in 2014.

Bryant made his major league debut in 2015. He was named an MLB All-Star and won the National League's (NL) Rookie of the Year Award. He was again named an All-Star in 2016, won a World Series championship with the Cubs, and was named the NL's Most Valuable Player.

List of Los Angeles Dodgers owners and executives

This is a list of Los Angeles Dodgers owners and executives.

List of Philadelphia Phillies award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Philadelphia Phillies professional baseball team.

Los Angeles Dodgers award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Los Angeles Dodgers professional baseball franchise, including its years in Brooklyn (1883–1957).

Minnesota Twins award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Minnesota Twins professional baseball team.

New York Mets award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the New York Mets professional baseball team.

Tampa Bay Rays award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Tampa Bay Rays professional baseball team.

Vladimir Guerrero Jr.

Vladimir Guerrero Ramos Jr. (born March 16, 1999) is a Canadian–Dominican professional baseball third baseman for the Toronto Blue Jays of Major League Baseball (MLB). He is considered the top prospect in all of professional baseball by both MLB and Baseball America.

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