Bart Gets an "F"

"Bart Gets an "F"" is the first episode of The Simpsons' second season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on October 11, 1990. In the episode, Bart fails four consecutive history exams and the school psychiatrist recommends that Bart repeat the fourth grade. Bart vows that he will start to do better and attempts to get the resident class genius Martin Prince to help him, but after that backfires, Bart prays for help. That night, Springfield is hit with a massive blizzard and the school is closed, giving Bart another day to study.

The episode was written by David M. Stern and directed by David Silverman. Mayor Quimby makes his first appearance and the episode was the first to feature a new opening sequence. "Bart gets an 'F'" was the third episode produced for the second season, but it was chosen to be the season premiere because it prominently featured Bart.

Due to the success of the first season of The Simpsons, Fox decided to switch the show's time slot to Thursday at 8:00 p.m. EST where it would air opposite of NBC's The Cosby Show, the number one show at the time. Through the summer, several news outlets published stories about the supposed "Bill vs. Bart" rivalry and heavily hyped the first episode of the second season. Several critics predicted that "Bart gets an 'F'" would do considerably worse in the ratings than The Cosby Show. However, the final Nielsen rating for the episode was 18.4 and a 29% share of the audience, finishing second in its time slot behind The Cosby Show, which had an 18.5 rating and 29% share. It finished eighth in the weekly ratings, but was watched by an estimated 33.6 million viewers, making it the number one show in terms of actual viewers that week. It became the highest rated and most watched program in the history of the Fox network and remained in that position until January 1, 1995. Currently, it is still the highest rated episode in the history of The Simpsons.

The episode has received positive reviews from television critics and was ranked 31st on Entertainment Weekly's 1999 list of "The 100 Greatest Moments in Television".

"Bart Gets an "F""
The Simpsons episode
A scene involving Lisa, Marge, and Maggie ice skating during a snow day. The scene was one of the most difficult sequences to animate according to animator David Silverman
The "Snow Day" sequence was one of the most difficult sequences David Silverman had to animate, as it featured multiple panoramic shots and was hard to time coherently.
Episode no.Season 2
Episode 1 (14th overall)
Directed byDavid Silverman
Written byDavid M. Stern
Production code7F03
Original air dateOctober 11, 1990
Episode features
Chalkboard gag"I will not encourage others to fly".[1]
Couch gagThe couch falls through the floor as Homer says "D'oh!"[2]
CommentaryMatt Groening
James L. Brooks
Al Jean
Mike Reiss
David Silverman

Plot

Bart presents a book report at Springfield Elementary School on Treasure Island, but throughout his presentation, it is blatantly obvious that he did not read the book. After school, Mrs. Krabappel tells Bart his grades have steadily gotten worse and warns him about an upcoming exam on Colonial America, but Bart does not pay attention, and puts off studying. The next day at school, Bart feigns illness and that night, Lisa warns Bart he cannot evade his responsibilities forever, but Bart calls Milhouse for the test answers. After school the next day, an overconfident Bart hands in his test, only to get a poor score that is even worse than Milhouse's substandard test and have Mrs. Krabappel take remedial action.

Homer and Marge are called in to meet with Mrs. Krabappel and school psychiatrist Dr. J. Loren Pryor. Dr. Pryor says Bart is an underachiever and recommends that he repeat the fourth grade. Homer and Marge consider that holding Bart back might not be such a bad idea. However, Bart is against this idea, and vows that he will start to do better and will pass. In desperation, Bart asks Martin Prince to help him get a passing grade. Martin is initially reluctant to help Bart, but agrees to do so when Bart agrees to show him how to become more popular. The two boys initially help each other out, but Martin starts to take on some of Bart's poor character traits. He decides to quit being a bookworm and hang out with his new friends and go to the arcade, and abandons Bart. Left with little time to study on his own, Bart prays to God and asks that something miraculous happen to make him miss school the next day so he can have more time to study. That night, Springfield is hit with a massive blizzard, and the schools are closed.

After receiving word of the school closures, Bart prepares for a fun snow day. However, Lisa reminds him of his prayer, and Bart decides to make good with God by studying while everyone else is outside having fun. The next day, he finishes the test and asks Mrs. Krabappel to grade it immediately. She does so, giving him a 59, failing by just one point. Bart breaks down at having failed despite all his efforts. Mrs. Krabappel is initially stunned and tries to console him, but when Bart compares his failure to George Washington's surrender of Fort Necessity to the French in 1754, Mrs. Krabappel is impressed at this obscure historical reference, realizes that Bart has put more effort in and gives him an extra point for demonstrating applied knowledge, pushing his grade up to a D-, a barely passing grade. An ecstatic Bart runs throughout Springfield, exclaiming to people that he actually passed.

Production

Davidmstern
"Bart gets an 'F'" was the first episode written by David M. Stern

"Bart gets an 'F'" was the first episode of The Simpsons to be written by David M. Stern. It was directed by David Silverman. Over the summer of 1990, Bart's rebellious nature was characterized by some parents and conservatives as a poor role model for children,[3] while several American public schools banned T-shirts featuring Bart next to captions such as "I'm Bart Simpson. Who the hell are you?" and "Underachiever ('And proud of it, man!')".[4] Several critics thought that the episode was a response to these controversies.[5][6] However, executive producer James L. Brooks responded that it was not, but added, "we're mindful of it. I do think it's important for us that Bart does badly in school. There are students like that. Besides, I'm very wary of television where everybody is supposed to be a role model. You don't run across that many role models in real life. Why should television be full of them?"[7] Sam Simon commented that "there are themes to the shows we did last year, important themes, I think it's a tribute to how well we executed them that nobody realized we had a point."[8] Bart says "Cowabunga" for the second time (the first time being in "The Telltale Head"), which was commonly associated with Bart through its use as a T-shirt slogan.[9] Mayor Quimby makes his first appearance in this episode, without his trademark sash that says "Mayor".[2] The sash was later added because the writers feared that viewers would not recognize him.[10]

The episode was the first to feature a new opening sequence, which was shortened by fifteen seconds from its original length of roughly 90 seconds. The opening sequence for the first season showed Bart stealing a "Bus Stop" sign; whilst the new sequence featured him skateboarding past several characters who had been introduced during the previous season. Lisa's bike ride was also cut, replaced with a 1-second whiplash pan of Springfield, with various other characters, before Homer's car pulls up in the driveway. Starting with this season, there were three versions of the opening: a full roughly 75-second version, a 45-second version and a 25-second version. This gave the show's editors more leeway.[10] David Silverman believes that the animators began to "come into their own" as they had gotten used to the characters and were able to achieve more with character acting. During the scene where Bart delivers a speech where he states he is "dumb as a post", Silverman wanted to cut from several angles very quickly to give a sense of anxiety.[10] Martin Prince's design was changed several times during the episode. There was a different model that had larger eyes and wilder hair designed for the scene where Martin betrays Bart and runs off.[10] Silverman describes the "Snow Day" sequence as one of the hardest things he ever had to animate. It features several long pans that show many different characters engaging in various activities and was difficult to time correctly.[10] Bart's fantasy where he sees the founding fathers of the United States uses muted colors and variations of red, white and blue.[10] Silverman also had to work hard to make Bart cry without making his design look too off-putting, and this is the reason why he was shown covering his face with a piece of paper.[10]

First broadcast

Move to Thursday

Jameslbrooks
James L. Brooks opposed the moving of The Simpsons to a Thursday night

The first season of The Simpsons had finished as high as 4th in the weekly ratings[11] and was the Fox network's first series to rank among a season's top 30 highest-rated shows[12] and Bart quickly became one of the most popular characters on television in what was termed "Bartmania".[13][14][15] Due to the success of the first season of the show, the Fox network decided to switch The Simpsons' timeslot in hopes that it would steal ratings from NBC's "powerhouse" line up, generate more advertising revenue,[16] and result in higher ratings for Beverly Hills, 90210 and Babes, which would follow the show.[17][18] The show was moved from its from 8:00 p.m. EST Sunday night slot to the same time on Thursday, where it would compete with NBC's The Cosby Show, the number one show at the time.[17] Many of the producers of The Simpsons, including James L. Brooks, were against the move. The show had been in the top 10 while airing on Sunday and they felt the move would destroy its ratings.[19] He commented that "Suddenly a show that was a hit is fighting for its survival, [...] We're not fighting Cosby, we just want to get healthy ratings. There have been two weeks in my life when a show I was associated with was number one in the ratings, and on Sunday night, we had a chance to be the number one show in the country. I don't think we have a chance on Thursday night."[7]

"Two Cars in Every Garage and Three Eyes on Every Fish" was the first episode produced for the season, but "Bart gets an 'F'" aired first because Bart was popular at the time and the producers had wanted to premiere with an episode involving him.[9] It aired opposite the fourth episode of the seventh season of The Cosby Show titled "Period of Adjustment", which saw the addition of Erika Alexander to the cast.[20] The first 13 episodes of The Simpsons had been rerun several times through the summer, and Fox heavily promoted the first new episode since May,[21] and news outlets published stories about the supposed "Bill vs. Bart" rivalry.[19][22][23]

Nielsen rating

Reruns of The Simpsons that aired in the Thursday time slot against new episodes of The Cosby Show were ranked as low as 73rd in the weekly ratings (compared with third place for The Cosby Show).[24][25] Several critics predicted that "Bart gets an 'F'" would do considerably worse in the ratings than The Cosby Show.[11] Greg Dawson of the Orlando Sentinel wrote that he would "bet dollars to plain-cake doughnuts (a Homer pet peeve) that even a fresh Simpsons won't come within five rating points of Cosby, which could get a 30 share in a power blackout."[23] Fox executive Peter Chernin said they were hoping to establish a foothold on Thursday night and that "if we're really lucky and very fortunate, we're going to come in second place".[26]

Early overnight ratings figures for the original broadcast of the episode in 24 cities projected that The Simpsons had a 19.9 Nielsen Rating and 30% share of the audience while The Cosby Show had a 19.3 Nielsen Rating and 29% share.[27][28] However, the final rating for "Bart gets an 'F'" was an 18.4 and a 29% share of the audience, finishing second in its time slot behind The Cosby Show, which had an 18.5 rating and 29% share.[29] At the time, NBC had 208 television stations, while Fox had only 133.[30] It finished eighth in the weekly ratings, tied with Who's the Boss?, while The Cosby Show finished seventh.[31] The rating is based on the number of household televisions that were tuned into the show, but Nielsen Media Research estimated that 33.6 million viewers watched the episode, making it the number one show in terms of actual viewers that week (The Cosby Show was watched by 28.5 million, finished seventh).[32] It became the highest rated and most watched program in the history of the Fox Network.[32] It remained in that position until January 1, 1995, when a National Football League playoff game between the Minnesota Vikings and Chicago Bears achieved a Nielsen Rating of 21.0.[33] To date, it is still the highest rated episode in the history of The Simpsons.[34]

Cultural references

Bart's slapdash book report was on the Robert Louis Stevenson novel Treasure Island, while Martin presents Ernest Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea. Later on, Martin makes remarks about the forecastle of the Pequod in reference to Moby Dick.[1] During "Snow Day", the citizens of Springfield sing "Winter Wonderland".[1] The scene where everyone in Springfield gathers around the town circle, holds hands and begins singing is a reference to How the Grinch Stole Christmas![10] "Hallelujah", the chorus from George Frideric Handel's Messiah, can be heard when it starts snowing.[35]

Reception

The episode has received positive reviews from television critics. The authors of the book I Can't Believe It's a Bigger and Better Updated Unofficial Simpsons Guide, Warren Martyn and Adrian Wood, wrote, "A cracking opener to the second season – especially memorable for the sequence in which Bart prays for school to be cancelled the following day only to find himself exiled from the ensuing winter wonderland."[2] Virginia Mann of The Record felt it was "not as wildly funny as last season's best episodes, [but still] well-done, humorous, and, at times, poignant."[5] The episode was praised for its emotional scenes. Tom Shales wrote that the episode is "not only funny, it's touching" and praised it for its scenes where Bart prays, writing "There are few if any other entertainment shows on television that get into philosophical matters even this deeply. The Simpsons can be as thoughtful as a furrow-browed Bill Moyers pontification – yet infinitely more amusing."[36] Hal Boedeker of The Miami Herald felt it "pulls off a finale that's thoughtful without being preachy, tender without being sappy. Despite the tears, the show keeps its edge. And the way TV usually smears on the schmaltz, that's quite an achievement."[37] Phil Kloer of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution wrote "The episode does a good job of emphasizing the importance of studying without getting gooky. For all the talk about the anarchy of The Simpsons, the show sometimes has smuggled in an occasional message, as it does again."[38] In his book The Gospel According to the Simpsons, Mark I. Pinsky writes that "Bart gets an 'F'" offers the most detailed portrayal of the dynamic of prayer on The Simpsons."[35] Steve L. Case later included the episode in his book Toons That Teach, a list of 75 cartoons that help teach biblical lessons.[39]

The episode was ranked 31st on Entertainment Weekly's list of "The 100 Greatest Moments in Television", writing that it "stands as classic irreverent family TV".[40] In 2007, Larina Adamson, a supervising producer on The Simpsons, named "Bart Gets an 'F'" as her favorite episode of the series.[41] In 2010, the BBC named "Bart gets an 'F'" as one of the ten most memorable episodes of the show, calling it "insightful and poignant".[42]

References

  1. ^ a b c Groening, Matt (1997). Richmond, Ray; Coffman, Antonia (eds.). The Simpsons: A Complete Guide to Our Favorite Family (1st ed.). New York: HarperPerennial. ISBN 978-0-06-095252-5. LCCN 98141857. OCLC 37796735. OL 433519M.
  2. ^ a b c Martyn, Warren; Wood, Adrian (2000). "Bart Gets an F". BBC. Archived from the original on May 16, 2008. Retrieved September 3, 2008.
  3. ^ Rosenbaum, Martin (June 29, 2007). "Is The Simpsons still subversive?". BBC News. Archived from the original on August 25, 2007. Retrieved August 6, 2007.
  4. ^ Rohter, Larry (December 30, 1990). "Overacheiver – and Learning to Deal With It, Man". The New York Times. Retrieved September 18, 2008.
  5. ^ a b Mann, Virginia (October 11, 1990). "Rueful Bart retains old 'Simpsons Bite'". The Record.
  6. ^ Tucker, Ernest (October 10, 1990). "New 'Simpsons' episodes return – as smart as ever". Chicago Sun-Times.
  7. ^ a b Shales, Tom (October 11, 1990). "The Simpsons – they're scrapping again-but this time it's a ratings fight". The Washington Post.
  8. ^ Boss, Kit (October 10, 1990). "Family Feud – The Simpsons and Huxtables will fight it out on Thursdays". The Seattle Times.
  9. ^ a b Jean, Al. (2002). Commentary for "Bart gets an 'F'", in The Simpsons: The Complete Second Season [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h Silverman, David. (2002). Commentary for "Bart gets an 'F'", in The Simpsons: The Complete Second Season [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  11. ^ a b Drew, Mike (October 9, 1990). "Can Bart beat Bill on Thursdays?". The Milwaukee Journal.
  12. ^ "TV Ratings: 1989–1990". ClassicTVHits.com. Archived from the original on June 18, 2006. Retrieved July 3, 2006.
  13. ^ Cassidy, John (July 8, 1990). "Cartoon leads a revolt against apple-pie family – Simpsons". The Sunday Times.
  14. ^ "Simpsons set for big screen". The Daily Telegraph. July 15, 2007. Archived from the original on March 1, 2009. Retrieved April 15, 2009.
  15. ^ Kleinfield, N.R. (April 29, 1990). "Cashing in on a Hot New Brand Name". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 18, 2009. Retrieved April 15, 2009.
  16. ^ Lomartire, Paul (October 11, 1990). "Brat Bart vs. Cool Cos – FOX already has nabbed a share of Thursday's viewers". The Palm Beach Post.
  17. ^ a b Cerone, Daniel (May 9, 1991). "'Simpsons' steals away Cosby viewers". Los Angeles Times. p. 4.
  18. ^ Davies, Don (October 11, 1990). "'Simpsons'-'Cosby' duel needs VCR stat". Wisconsin State Journal.
  19. ^ a b Groening, Matt. (2002). Commentary for "Bart gets an 'F'", in The Simpsons: The Complete Second Season [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  20. ^ Holloway, Diane (October 11, 1990). "Have a cow, Bill: 'The Simpsons' have returned". Austin American-Statesman.
  21. ^ Marin, Rick (October 11, 1990). "Tonight Bart Simpson gets an 'A' – Season debut is sort of classy". The Washington Times.
  22. ^ "Bart Simpson–Defiant, Saw-Topped and Cheeky—the Brat Terrible Gave Underachievers a Good Name". People. Vol. 34 no. 26. December 31, 1990. Archived from the original on February 6, 2009. Retrieved September 18, 2008.
  23. ^ a b Dawson, Greg (October 11, 1990). "Barbs still pointed in new 'Simpsons' shows". Orlando Sentinel.
  24. ^ Dudek, Duane (October 10, 1990). "'The Simpsons' return to a fidgeting Fox". Milwaukee Sentinel.
  25. ^ Paeth, Greg (October 10, 1990). "Fox puts its bets on Simpsons". The Cincinnati Post.
  26. ^ Dawidziak, Mark (October 11, 1990). "Bart vs. Cosby: First real showdown is tonight". Lexington Herald-Leader.
  27. ^ Stein, Joe (October 12, 1990). "Bart beats Cos locally and in cities". The San Diego Union-Tribune.
  28. ^ The Associated Press (October 12, 1990). "NBC yawns as 'Simpsons' whips 'Cosby'". San Jose Mercury News.
  29. ^ Bickelhaupt, Susan (October 12, 1990). "Cosby beats Bart, but just barely". The Boston Globe.
  30. ^ Belcher, Walt (October 18, 1990). "'The Simpsons', 'Cosby' square off in second round". The Tampa Tribune. p. 6F.
  31. ^ The Associated Press (October 17, 1990). "'Cheers' is No. 1 show again". Houston Chronicle.
  32. ^ a b Pierce, Scott D. (October 18, 1990). "Don't have a cow, man! More viewers watch 'The Simpsons' than 'Cosby'!". Deseret News. p. C5.
  33. ^ The Associated Press (January 7, 1995). "Fox hits NFL playoff paydirt". Toronto Star.
  34. ^ Potts, Kimberly (2006). "'The Simpsons' Best Episodes: No. 15 – 11". AOL. Archived from the original on January 1, 2009. Retrieved September 3, 2008.
  35. ^ a b Pinsky, Mark I.; Tony Campolo (2001). The Gospel According to the Simpsons. Westminster John Knox Press. pp. 40–41. ISBN 0-664-22419-9.
  36. ^ Shales, Tom (October 11, 1990). "Bart's back". News & Record.
  37. ^ Boedeker, Hal (October 11, 1990). "The new family feud tonight, Bart and the Simpsons take on Cliff's clan for the ratings title". The Miami Herald.
  38. ^ Kloer, Phil (October 11, 1990). "TV review". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
  39. ^ Case, Steve L. (2005). Toons That Teach: 75 Cartoon Moments to Get Teenagers Talking. Zondervan. pp. 122–123. ISBN 0-310-25992-4.
  40. ^ Fretts, Bruce (1999). "The 100 Greatest Moments in Television/1990s". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on February 2, 2009. Retrieved May 7, 2009.
  41. ^ "'Simpsons' insiders pick their favorites". Idaho Statesman. May 29, 2007.
  42. ^ "The Simpsons: 10 classic episodes". BBC News. January 14, 2010. Retrieved March 3, 2010.

External links

1990 in animation

Events in 1990 in animation.

Bart Gets a 'Z'

"Bart Gets a 'Z'" is the second episode of The Simpsons' twenty-first season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on October 4, 2009.

In the episode, the fourth grade students of Springfield Elementary School decide to spike Edna Krabappel's coffee in order to teach her a lesson after she takes away their cell phones. She is fired by Principal Skinner, who hires a new teacher named Zachary Vaughn. Although Vaughn is a hip young teacher who impresses the students, Bart is plagued by guilt and tries to get Edna hired back.In its original airing, the episode had an estimated 9.32 million viewers and received a Nielsen rating of 5.1/8. The episode was written by Matt Selman, and directed by Mark Kirkland.

Bart Gets an Elephant

"Bart Gets an Elephant" is the seventeenth episode of The Simpsons' fifth season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on March 31, 1994. In this episode, Bart wins a radio contest and is awarded a full-grown African elephant that he names Stampy. After Stampy wrecks the Simpsons' house and eats all the food, Homer decides to sell Stampy to an ivory dealer. Bart runs away with Stampy to save his pet, but the family finds the two at a museum exhibit, where Homer sinks into a tar pit. Homer is saved by Stampy, and so gives the elephant away to an animal refuge instead.

The episode was written by John Swartzwelder, and directed by Jim Reardon. It introduced the fictional elephant Stampy, and marks the first appearance of the recurring character Cletus Spuckler. The episode features cultural references to the songs "Sixteen Tons" and "Do-Re-Mi", and the La Brea Tar Pits cluster of tar pits located in Hancock Park in Los Angeles, California.

Since airing, the episode has received mostly positive reviews from television critics. It acquired a Nielsen rating of 10.7, and was the highest-rated show on the Fox network the week it aired.

Bart Simpson

Bartholomew JoJo "Bart" Simpson is a fictional character in the American animated television series The Simpsons and part of the Simpson family. He is voiced by Nancy Cartwright and first appeared on television in The Tracey Ullman Show short "Good Night" on April 19, 1987. Cartoonist Matt Groening created and designed Bart while waiting in the lobby of James L. Brooks' office. Groening had been called to pitch a series of shorts based on his comic strip, Life in Hell, but instead decided to create a new set of characters. While the rest of the characters were named after Groening's family members, Bart's name is an anagram of the word brat. After appearing on The Tracey Ullman Show for three years, the Simpson family received its own series on Fox, which debuted December 17, 1989.

At ten years old, Bart is the eldest child and only son of Homer and Marge, and the brother of Lisa and Maggie. Bart's most prominent and popular character traits are his mischievousness, rebelliousness and disrespect for authority. He has appeared in other media relating to The Simpsons – including video games, The Simpsons Movie, The Simpsons Ride, commercials, and comic books – and inspired an entire line of merchandise.

In casting, Nancy Cartwright originally planned to audition for the role of Lisa, while Yeardley Smith tried out for Bart. Smith's voice was too high for a boy, so she was given the role of Lisa. Cartwright found that Lisa was not interesting at the time, so instead auditioned for Bart, which she thought was a better role.Hallmarks of the character include his chalkboard gags in the opening sequence; his prank calls to Moe; and his catchphrases "Eat my shorts", "¡Ay, caramba!", "Don't have a cow, man!", and "I'm Bart Simpson. Who the hell are you?". Although, with the exception of "Ay, caramba!", they have been retired or not often used.

During the first two seasons of The Simpsons, Bart was the show's breakout character and "Bartmania" ensued, spawning Bart Simpson-themed merchandise touting his rebellious attitude and pride at underachieving, which caused many parents and educators to cast him as a bad role model for children. Around the third season, the series started to focus more on the family as a whole, though Bart still remains a prominent character. Time named Bart one of the 100 most important people of the 20th century, and he was named "entertainer of the year" in 1990 by Entertainment Weekly. Nancy Cartwright has won several awards for voicing Bart, including a Primetime Emmy Award in 1992 and an Annie Award in 1995. In 2000, Bart, along with the rest of his family, was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

He has appeared in every Simpsons episode except "Four Great Women and a Manicure".

Bart of Darkness

"Bart of Darkness" is the first episode of The Simpsons' sixth season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on September 4, 1994. It was written by Dan McGrath, and directed by Jim Reardon. In the episode, Bart breaks his leg and becomes increasingly isolated in his room. He starts spying on neighbors with a telescope and begins to suspect that Ned Flanders has murdered his wife. The episode was produced during the 1994 Northridge earthquake, which delayed production by a month, and is largely a parody of the film Rear Window.

History of The Simpsons

The Simpsons is an American animated television sitcom starring the animated Simpson family, which was created by Matt Groening. He conceived of the characters in the lobby of James L. Brooks's office and named them after his own family members, substituting "Bart" for his own name. The family debuted as shorts on The Tracey Ullman Show on April 19, 1987. After a three-season run, the sketch was developed into a half-hour prime time show called The Simpsons, which debuted on December 17, 1989. The show was an early hit for Fox, becoming the first Fox series to land in the top 30 ratings in a season (1990).

The show was controversial from its beginning and has made the news several times. In the early seasons, some parents and conservatives characterized Bart as a poor role model for children and several United States public schools even banned The Simpsons merchandise and T-shirts. In January 1992, then-President George H. W. Bush made a speech during his re-election campaign in which he said: "We are going to keep on trying to strengthen the American family, to make American families a lot more like the Waltons and a lot less like the Simpsons." In 2002, the show was nearly sued by the Rio de Janeiro tourist board for creating an unreal image of the city on the show.

The Simpsons Movie, a feature-length film, was released in theaters worldwide on July 26 and July 27, 2007. Previous attempts to create a film version of The Simpsons failed due to the lack of a script of appropriate length and production crew members. Eventually, producers Brooks, Groening, Al Jean, Mike Scully, and Richard Sakai began development of the film in 2001. They conceived numerous plot ideas, with Groening's being the one developed into a film. The script was re-written over a hundred times, and this creativity continued after animation had begun in 2006. The film was a box office success, and received overwhelmingly positive reviews.

The Simpsons eventually became the longest-running American sitcom, the longest-running American animated program, and in 2009 it surpassed Gunsmoke as the longest-running American primetime, scripted television series. Since its debut on December 17, 1989, the show has broadcast 665 episodes and its 30th season started airing on September 30, 2018.

Jim Reardon

Jim Reardon (born 1965) is an American animation director and storyboard consultant best known for his work on the animated TV series The Simpsons. He has directed over 30 episodes of the series and was credited as a supervising director for seasons 9 through 15. Reardon attended the Character Animation program at the California Institute of the Arts in 1982, where one of his student projects, the satirical cartoon Bring Me the Head of Charlie Brown (1986), has become a cult classic through the likes of YouTube. He was hired by John Kricfalusi as a writer on Mighty Mouse: The New Adventures and later worked on Tiny Toon Adventures. He has been described by Ralph Bakshi as "one of the best cartoon writers in the business".Reardon supervised the storyboard department and co-wrote the Pixar film WALL-E with Andrew Stanton, which was released on June 27, 2008. He was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for WALL-E at the 81st Academy Awards.

Lisa's First Word

"Lisa's First Word" is the tenth episode of The Simpsons' fourth season. It was first broadcast on the Fox network in the United States on December 3, 1992. In the episode, as the Simpson family gathers around Maggie and tries to encourage her to say her first word, Marge reminisces and tells the story of Lisa's first word. Elizabeth Taylor appeared for the voicing of Maggie's first word.

The episode was directed by Mark Kirkland and written by Jeff Martin. After its initial airing on Fox, the episode was later released as part of a 1999 video collection: The Simpsons: Greatest Hits, and released again on the 2003 DVD edition of the same collection. The episode features cultural references to two chains of fast food restaurants, Wendy's and McDonald's, as well as a reference to the 1981 arcade video game Ms. Pac-Man.

"Lisa's First Word" received positive reception from television critics, and acquired a Nielsen rating of 16.6.

List of fictional pachyderms

This list of fictional pachyderms is a subsidiary to the List of fictional ungulates. Characters from various fictional works are organized by medium.

Outside strict biological classification, the term "pachyderm" is commonly used to describe elephants, rhinoceroses, and hippopotami; this list also includes extinct mammals such as woolly mammoths, mastodons, etc.

Mayor Quimby

Mayor Joseph Fitzgerald O'Malley Fitzpatrick O'Donnell The Edge Quimby, nicknamed Diamond Joe, is a recurring character from the animated television series The Simpsons. He is voiced by Dan Castellaneta, and first appeared in the episode "Bart Gets an F". Quimby is the mayor of Springfield, and is a composite parody of U.S. Senator Ted Kennedy and certain other members of the Kennedy family who have entered politics.

Religion in The Simpsons

Religion is one of many recurring themes on the American animated television series The Simpsons. Much of the series' religious humor satirizes aspects of Christianity and religion in general. However, some episodes, such as "Bart Sells His Soul" and "Alone Again, Natura-Diddily", can be interpreted as having a spiritual theme. The show has been both praised and criticized by atheists, agnostics, liberals, conservatives and religious people in general for its portrayal of faith and religion in society. The show can function as a mediator of biblical literacy among younger generations of irreligious viewers.In the series, the Simpson family attends services led by Reverend Lovejoy. The church's denomination is identified as the "Western Branch of American Reform Presbylutheranism" in the episode "The Father, the Son, and the Holy Guest Star." This is generally interpreted as representing the multitude of American Protestant traditions in general and not one specific denomination.

Simpson and Delilah

"Simpson and Delilah" is the second episode of The Simpsons' second season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on October 18, 1990. Homer uses the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant medical insurance plan to buy 'Dimoxinil', a miracle hair growth formula. Homer grows hair, and is given a promotion at work which allows him to hire a secretary named Karl. The episode was directed by Rich Moore and written by Jon Vitti, and guest starred Harvey Fierstein as Karl.

The Simpsons

The Simpsons is an American animated sitcom created by Matt Groening for the Fox Broadcasting Company. The series is a satirical depiction of working-class life, epitomized by the Simpson family, which consists of Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa, and Maggie. The show is set in the fictional town of Springfield and parodies American culture and society, television, and the human condition.

The family was conceived by Groening shortly before a solicitation for a series of animated shorts with producer James L. Brooks. Groening created a dysfunctional family and named the characters after his own family members, substituting Bart for his own name. The shorts became a part of The Tracey Ullman Show on April 19, 1987. After three seasons, the sketch was developed into a half-hour prime time show and became Fox's first series to land in the Top 30 ratings in a season (1989–90).

Since its debut on December 17, 1989, 665 episodes of The Simpsons have been broadcast. It is the longest-running American sitcom, and the longest-running American scripted primetime television series, both in terms of seasons and number of episodes. The Simpsons Movie, a feature-length film, was released in theaters worldwide on July 27, 2007, and grossed over $527 million. Then on October 30, 2007, a video game was released. Currently, The Simpsons finished airing its thirtieth season, which

began airing September 30, 2018. The Simpsons was renewed for a thirty-first and thirty-second season on February 6, 2019, in which the latter will contain the 700th episode. The Simpsons is a joint production by Gracie Films and 20th Century Fox Television and syndicated by 20th Television.The Simpsons received acclaim throughout its first nine or ten seasons, which are generally considered its "Golden Age". Time named it the 20th century's best television series, and Erik Adams of The A.V. Club named it "television's crowning achievement regardless of format". On January 14, 2000, the Simpson family was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. It has won dozens of awards since it debuted as a series, including 34 Primetime Emmy Awards, 30 Annie Awards, and a Peabody Award. Homer's exclamatory catchphrase "D'oh!" has been adopted into the English language, while The Simpsons has influenced many other later adult-oriented animated sitcoms. However, it has also been criticized for a perceived decline in quality over the years.

The Simpsons returned to Animation Domination on September 29, 2019.

The Simpsons (season 2)

The Simpsons' second season originally aired on the Fox network between October 11, 1990 and July 11, 1991, and contained 22 episodes, beginning with "Bart Gets an "F"". Another episode, "Blood Feud", aired during the summer after the official season finale. The executive producers for the second production season were Matt Groening, James L. Brooks, and Sam Simon, who had also been EPs for the previous season. The DVD box set was released on August 6, 2002 in Region 1, July 8, 2002 in Region 2 and in September, 2002 in Region 4. The episode "Homer vs. Lisa and the 8th Commandment" won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Animated Program (for Programming Less Than One Hour), and was also nominated in the "Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy Series or a Special" category.

The Simpsons (season 5)

The Simpsons' fifth season originally aired on the Fox network between September 30, 1993 and May 19, 1994. The showrunner for the fifth production season was David Mirkin who executive produced 20 episodes. Al Jean and Mike Reiss executive produced the remaining two, which were both hold overs that were produced for the previous season. The season contains some of the series' most acclaimed and popular episodes, including "Cape Feare", "Homer Goes to College" and "Rosebud". It also includes the 100th episode, "Sweet Seymour Skinner's Baadasssss Song". The season was nominated for two Primetime Emmy Awards and won an Annie Award for Best Animated Television Program as well as an Environmental Media Award and a Genesis Award. The DVD box set was released in Region 1 on December 21, 2004, Region 2 on March 21, 2005, and Region 4 on March 23, 2005.

Two Cars in Every Garage and Three Eyes on Every Fish

"Two Cars in Every Garage and Three Eyes on Every Fish" is the fourth episode of The Simpsons' second season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on November 1, 1990. In the episode, Bart catches a three-eyed fish in a river downstream of the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant. This prompts an inspection of the plant, and in order to prevent it from being shut down, Mr. Burns decides to run for governor. After a hard campaign that sees Burns rise from being universally despised to running neck and neck with popular incumbent Mary Bailey, it is decided that Burns will have dinner with a random employee the night before the election. Homer is chosen, much to Marge's chagrin.

The episode was written by Sam Simon and John Swartzwelder, and directed by Wes Archer. It was the first episode produced for season two and was intended to air as the season premiere, but was replaced with "Bart Gets an "F"" due to Bart's popularity in the early 1990s. The episode features cultural references to several American films, mostly the 1941 film Citizen Kane, with Burns in the role of the character Charles Foster Kane. Mary Bailey shares her name with George Bailey's wife in the 1946 film It's a Wonderful Life.

Journalists have described the episode as a satire on both American politics and environmentalism. It won an Environmental Media Award in 1991 for being the best television episode of the year with an environmental message. Since the episode first aired, the three-eyed fish Blinky has been mentioned several times in news articles regarding nuclear waste and mutation.

The episode was positively received by television critics for its satire on American politics. It acquired a Nielsen rating of 15.8, and was the highest-rated show on the Fox network the week it aired.

Yellow Subterfuge

"Yellow Subterfuge" is the seventh episode of the 25th season of the American animated sitcom The Simpsons, and the 537th episode of the series. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on December 8, 2013. It was written by Joel H. Cohen and directed by Bob Anderson. In the episode, when Principal Skinner promises that the most well-behaved at Springfield Elementary will get to ride in a submarine, Bart does everything possible to become a model student. Meanwhile, Krusty, on Lisa's advice, sells the foreign rights to his show in order to rake in more money, but the international Krustys soon become more popular than the domestic ones.

Season 2
Themed episodes
See also

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