Barry Wilburn

Barry Todd Wilburn (born December 9, 1963 in Memphis, Tennessee) is a former professional American football player who was drafted by the Washington Redskins in the eight round (219th overall) of the 1985 NFL Draft. A 6'3", 186-lb. cornerback from the University of Mississippi, Wilburn played in eight NFL seasons from 1985 to 1996 (he missed two seasons due to injury) and in two CFL seasons for the Saskatchewan Roughriders and the British Columbia Lions. He played in one final season in 1999 for the Winnipeg Blue Bombers before retiring.

Barry Wilburn
No. 45, 47
1988 Redskins Police - 15 Barry Wilburn (crop)
Wilburn playing for the Redskins in the 1987-88 NFC Championship game
Born:December 9, 1963 (age 55)
Memphis, Tennessee
Career information
StatusRetired
CFL statusInternational
Position(s)CB
CollegeMississippi
NFL draft1985 / Round: 8 / Pick: 219
Drafted byWashington Redskins
Career history
As player
1985–1989Washington Redskins
1992Cleveland Browns
1993Saskatchewan Roughriders
1994BC Lions
1995–1996Philadelphia Eagles
1999Winnipeg Blue Bombers
Career stats

Professional career

Wilburn started in Super Bowl XXII for the Redskins, and recorded two interceptions in their 42-10 victory. Wilburn retired with 20 career interceptions and five fumble recoveries. He also won a Grey Cup title as a member of the 1994 BC Lions, making him one of only ten players[1] to have won football championships on both sides of the border (Super Bowl and Grey Cup).

Wilburn holds the Redskins record for the longest interception return after scoring on a 100-yard return against the Minnesota Vikings in 1987.[2]

Personal life

Wilburn is the son of Olympic great, Margaret Matthews Wilburn and the father of Jordan and Dominique Wilburn, named for his two favorite NBA basketball players.

References

  1. ^ http://www.canadianfootballfantasy.com/GREYCUPSUPERBOWL.html
  2. ^ "Reed rumbles 108 yards for NFL record | Longest interception returns by team". Pro Football Hall of Fame. November 24, 2008. Retrieved June 2, 2014.
1985 Washington Redskins season

The 1985 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 54th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 49th in Washington, D.C.. The team failed to improve on their 11–5 record from 1984 and finished 10-6. The biggest moment of the year occurred on a November 18 Monday Night Football game, which witnessed Joe Theismann's career-ending injury after a sack by New York Giants outside linebacker Lawrence Taylor. The tackle resulted in a serious leg injury, and Theismann never played in the NFL again. Though the team failed to make the playoffs, they remained in contention for the entire regular season.

1986 Washington Redskins season

The 1986 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 55th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 51st in Washington, D.C.. The team improved on their 10–6 record from 1985 and returned to the playoffs after missing them the previous year, finishing with a 12–4 record, a second place finish in the NFC East, and qualified for the playoffs as a wild card. They defeated the Los Angeles Rams in the NFC Wild Card Game at RFK Stadium, then upset the defending champion Chicago Bears in the Divisional Playoffs. The season came to an end in the NFC Championship Game when the Redskins were defeated by their division rivals, the New York Giants.

1987 All-Pro Team

The 1987 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly and The Sporting News in 1987. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1987 NEA went with a 3-4 format for their All-Pro defense.

1988 Washington Redskins season

The 1988 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 57th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 53rd in Washington, D.C. They failed to improve on their 11–4 record from 1987, when they won Super Bowl XXII and finished 7-9. The Redskins failed to qualify for the playoffs for the first time since 1985. They were the seventh team in NFL history to enter a season as the defending Super Bowl champion and miss the playoffs.The Week 8 meeting against Green Bay at Lambeau Field would be the two teams' final meeting for 13 years.

1989 Washington Redskins season

The 1989 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 58th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 53rd in Washington, D.C. They improved on their 7–9 record from 1988 to 10-6 in 1989, finishing third in the NFC East. However, they failed to qualify for the playoffs for a second consecutive season.

1993 CFL season

The 1993 Canadian Football League season is considered to be the 40th season in modern-day Canadian football, although it is officially the 36th Canadian Football League season.

1993 Saskatchewan Roughriders season

The 1993 Saskatchewan Roughriders competed in the Canadian Football League, finishing in 3rd place in the West Division with an 11–7–0 record. The Roughriders qualified for the playoffs, but lost the West Semi-Final game to the Edmonton Eskimos.

1994 BC Lions season

The 1994 BC Lions finished in third place in the West Division with an 11–6–1 record. They won all of their playoff games and won the 82nd Grey Cup at home in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Angelo Snipes

Angelo Bernard Snipes (born January 11, 1963) is a former American football linebacker in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins, the San Diego Chargers, and the Kansas City Chiefs. He later played six seasons in the Canadian Football League for four teams. He played college football at the University of West Georgia.

Dave Chaytors

Dave Chaytors (born October 12, 1969) is a former Canadian football defensive lineman in the Canadian Football League who played for the Ottawa Rough Riders and BC Lions. He played college football for the Utah Utes.

Doug Petersen (Canadian football)

Doug Petersen (born November 28, 1969) is a former Canadian football defensive lineman in the Canadian Football League who played for the BC Lions, Montreal Alouettes, and Edmonton Eskimos. He played for the Simon Fraser Clan.

Gene Gaines

Gene Gaines (born June 26, 1938) was a football player in the CFL sixteen years. He starred as a defensive back for the Ottawa Rough Riders and Montreal Alouettes. He is a member of the Canadian Football Hall of Fame.In 1970, he was both a player and one of the defensive backfield coaches for the Alouettes.

Ian Sinclair (Canadian football)

Ian Sinclair (born 1960 in Toronto, Ontario) is a former professional Canadian football offensive lineman who played eleven seasons in the Canadian Football League for the BC Lions. He played college football at the University of Miami where he was part of the 1983 Miami Hurricanes football team national champions. He also was a part of the Lions Grey Cup victories in 1985 and 1994.

James Jefferson (gridiron football)

James Andrew Jefferson III (born November 18, 1963) is a former American and Canadian football defensive back in the National Football League (NFL) and Canadian Football League (CFL). He played for the Seattle Seahawks of the NFL and the Winnipeg Blue Bombers and BC Lions of the CFL, and also won two Grey Cup championships, one with the Blue Bombers in 1988 and another with the Lions in 1994. Jefferson played college football at Texas A&M-Kingsville.

Jamie Taras

Jamie Taras (born January 31, 1966, in Acton, Ontario) is a former professional Canadian football player with the Canadian Football League British Columbia Lions, and current Director of Community Relations with the BC Lions. Taras spent his entire 16-year career with the Lions as a fullback and offensive lineman, and played on two Grey Cup championship teams with the club.Taras played Canadian college football at the University of Western Ontario. In 2003, Taras was voted a member of the B.C. Lions All-Time Dream Team as part of the club’s 50th anniversary celebration. Taras' number 60 jersey is one of eleven numbers retired by the B.C. Lions.

Less Browne

Less Browne (born December 7, 1959) was a United States Football League and Canadian Football League defensive back for the Pittsburgh Maulers (USFL), the Hamilton Tiger-Cats, the Winnipeg Blue Bombers, the Ottawa Rough Riders and the BC Lions.

Rob Smith (Canadian football)

Robert Smith is a former Canadian football offensive lineman who won a Grey Cup championship with the British Columbia Lions in 1994.

Spencer McLennan

Spencer McLennan (born October 10, 1966 in Kelowna, British Columbia) is a former Canadian football player in the Canadian Football League for ten years. McLennan played safety and slotback for the three teams, the British Columbia Lions, Montreal Alouettes and Winnipeg Blue Bombers from 1991-2000. He also occasionally played cornerback. He was a CFL East All-Star in 1996.

Super Bowl XXII

Super Bowl XXII was an American football game between the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Washington Redskins and American Football Conference (AFC) champion Denver Broncos to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1987 season. The Redskins defeated the Broncos by the score of 42–10, winning their second Super Bowl. The game was played on January 31, 1988 at Jack Murphy Stadium in San Diego, the first time that the Super Bowl was played in that city.

This Super Bowl came at the end of a season that was shortened by a players' strike. Each team only missed one regular season game due to the labor dispute, but three games were played mostly with replacement players until the dispute was settled. The Broncos were making their second consecutive (and third overall) Super Bowl appearance, after posting a 10–4–1 regular season record, largely through the strength of their quarterback, John Elway. The Redskins, who were making their fourth Super Bowl appearance, posted an 11–4 regular season record. Washington was led by quarterback Doug Williams, who entered the season as a backup, and was 0-2 as a starter during the regular season. He ended up leading Washington to their two playoff victories. In doing so, he became the first African American quarterback ever to start in an NFL league championship game, let alone a Super Bowl.

After trailing 10–0 at the end of the first quarter of Super Bowl XXII, the Redskins scored 42 unanswered points, including a record-breaking 35 points in the second quarter, and setting several other Super Bowl records. Williams, who was named the Super Bowl MVP, completed 18 of 29 passes for a Super Bowl record 340 yards and four touchdowns, with one interception. He also became the first player in Super Bowl history to pass for four touchdowns in a single quarter, and four in a half. And thus Williams became the first African American starting quarterback to also win a Super Bowl.

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