Barry Switzer

Barry Layne Switzer (born October 5, 1937) is a former American football coach and player. He served for 16 years as head football coach at the University of Oklahoma and 4 years as head coach of the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). He won three national championships at Oklahoma, and led the Cowboys to win Super Bowl XXX against the Pittsburgh Steelers. He has one of the highest winning percentages of any college football coach in history,[1] and is one of only three head coaches to win both a college football national championship and a Super Bowl, the others being Jimmy Johnson and Pete Carroll.[2]

Barry Switzer
Barry Switzer
Biographical details
BornOctober 5, 1937 (age 81)
Crossett, Arkansas
Playing career
1956–1960Arkansas
Position(s)Center, linebacker
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1961–1965Arkansas (RB)
1966–1972Oklahoma (OC)
1973–1988Oklahoma
1994–1997Dallas Cowboys
Head coaching record
Overall157–29–4 (college)
40–24 (NFL regular season)
5–2 (NFL playoffs)
Bowls8–5
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Super Bowl XXX
3 National (1974–1975, 1985)
12 Big Eight (1973–1980, 1984–1987)
Awards
Sporting News College Football COY (1973)
Walter Camp Coach of the Year (1974)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2001 (profile)

Early life and career

Switzer was born on October 5, 1937, in Crossett, Arkansas, to parents Frank Mays Switzer and Mary Louise Switzer.[3] Barry and his younger brother, Donnie, were at home in rural Ashley County, Arkansas with their mother and father when, in early February 1954, it was raided by the Arkansas Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission and the Arkansas State Police. The Commission and the State Police found untaxed contraband liquor in the home. Frank made bond but was later tried and convicted of illegal trafficking in alcohol for purposes of re-sale ("bootlegging"). He was sentenced to a term of five years in prison, but that conviction was reversed upon appeal. Frank did serve five months of that term, and as a result, missed seeing Barry play his senior season of high school football.[4]

Barry and his brother Donnie were at home with their mother when on August 26, 1959, she took her life by her own hand with a .38 caliber pistol on the back porch. On November 16, 1972, after Barry and his brother had each commenced their professional careers, their father was murdered by a jealous lover.[5]

Barry accepted an athletic scholarship and played football at the University of Arkansas, where he joined Pi Kappa Alpha. During his senior season of 1959 (with a post-season game on January 1, 1960 against Georgia Tech) he was one of the Razorbacks' "Tri-Captains." After graduation, he did a brief stint in the U.S. Army and then returned to Arkansas as an assistant coach.[6]

University of Oklahoma

Following the 1966 season, Switzer moved to the University of Oklahoma as an assistant coach under new head coach and good friend, Jim Mackenzie. After Mackenzie died of a heart attack following spring practice of 1967, Switzer continued as an assistant under former University of Houston assistant and new Oklahoma head coach Chuck Fairbanks.

Switzer made a name for himself when he was OU's offensive coordinator by perfecting the wishbone offense and developing it into the most prolific rushing offense in college football history. Under Switzer, the Sooners set an NCAA rushing record of 472 yards per game in 1971 and scored over 500 points in two different seasons, 1971 and 1986.[7] When Fairbanks accepted the position of head coach of the New England Patriots following the 1972 season, Switzer was the obvious choice to succeed him.[2]

Switzer became head coach at Oklahoma in 1973. He was so successful that by his seventh season in 1979, the St. Petersburg Times wrote that Switzer was the high priest of what Billy Sims, who won the Heisman Trophy in 1978, described as the church of OU football.[8] Switzer led the team to undefeated seasons in 1973 and 1974. Oklahoma won national championships in 1974, 1975 and 1985 under Switzer's leadership. The team won or shared in the Big Eight Conference championship every year from 1973 to 1980. During his sixteen years as head coach at Oklahoma, his teams won eight of the thirteen post-season bowl games they played in, and 54 of his players were selected as All-Americans.

In 1983, Switzer was sued by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) for an alleged civil violation of the laws prohibiting "insider trading" of securities. He defended himself as having innocently overheard the information while lounging on the bleacher behind some corporate insiders—at a stadium where Switzer was watching his elder son compete in a track meet. The case was tried in Oklahoma City United States District Court (before a special U.S. District Judge appointed from Kansas). The case was dismissed at the conclusion of the Government's case for its failure to demonstrate that there had been any purposeful disclosure to Switzer.[9][10]

In 1989, Oklahoma was placed on probation by the NCAA [2] amidst several scandals involving Oklahoma players, including Charles Thompson's arrest for soliciting cocaine to undercover FBI agents.[11] In that same year, after sixteen years as Oklahoma's head coach, Switzer chose to resign. Switzer succeeded in getting the better of several famous contemporaries, including a 12–5 mark against Tom Osborne, 5–3 against Jimmy Johnson, 3–0 against Bobby Bowden, and 1–0 against Joe Paterno, Bo Schembechler, and Woody Hayes. Along with Bennie Owen, Bud Wilkinson, and Bob Stoops, he is one of four coaches to win over 100 games at the University of Oklahoma. No other college football program has had more than three coaches accomplish such a feat.

Switzer was known as an outstanding recruiter of high school talent, particularly in the neighboring state of Texas. His record against Texas in his sixteen seasons as Oklahoma's head coach is 9–5–2. The 1984 game between these two universities ended in a 15–15 tie by virtue of a field goal by Texas on the last play of the game. On the next to last play of the game, however, there had been an apparent interception of a Texas pass thrown into the end zone by Oklahoma's Keith Stansberry. The pass was, however, ruled incomplete and the interception waved off. Bruce Finlayson, Supervisor of Officials for the 1984 game later admitted, as reported in the Daily Oklahoman newspaper the following Monday, October 14, 1984, that the officiating crew had made an error in not confirming Oklahoma's interception. The correct call would have preserved a 15–12 Oklahoma victory and changed Switzer's record against Texas to 10–5–1.[12] Switzer has a 3–0–1 record against UT-Austin's Darrell Royal and a 2–0 mark against that university's David McWilliams.

Dallas Cowboys

Switzer resurfaced in coaching in 1994 with the Dallas Cowboys. Switzer stepped in following the departure of Jimmy Johnson, who as head coach had won the previous two Super Bowls. Johnson had clashed with owner Jerry Jones and many felt that Switzer was more apt to go along with Jones' ideas. Switzer was successful with the Cowboys, going 12–4 his first season in 1994 (losing to the 49ers in the NFC Championship). However, in the game he was criticized for making two critical errors. In the first half, with the Cowboys down 24–14, he opted not to run out the clock, giving the 49ers a chance to score one last touchdown before the half ended. Later, in the fourth quarter, with the Cowboys still down 38–28 and trying to rally, he was penalized for touching an official with his hip while demonstrating what he felt had been San Francisco's Deion Sanders committing pass interference against Dallas' Michael Irvin—which had not been called. This ended the Cowboys' chances of a comeback.

In Switzer's second season of 1995, the team went 12–4. Dallas won Super Bowl XXX over the Pittsburgh Steelers, 27–17, making Switzer one of only three coaches to win a college national championship and a Super Bowl, the others being Johnson and Pete Carroll.

In August 1997, Switzer was arrested after a loaded .38-caliber revolver was found in his luggage at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. Switzer, who was returning to the team's training camp facility in Austin, said there were children at his Dallas home and he put the gun in his bag to hide it from them. He said he accidentally forgot to remove the gun from the bag before heading to the airport.[13] Switzer pleaded guilty, was fined $3,500, and was given one year deferred adjudication. Two days later, he was fined $75,000 by Jones (equivalent to $117,055 in 2018).[14] After a disappointing 6–10 season in 1997, Switzer resigned as head coach of the Cowboys with a 40–24 career NFL coaching record.[2][15]

After coaching

In late 2000, Switzer was initiated as an honorary member of the Oklahoma Kappa chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Switzer was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2002.[1] In 2004, he received the Jim Thorpe Lifetime Achievement Award. Switzer still resides in Norman, Oklahoma with his wife Becky.[2] In August 2007, XMSN added Switzer[16] as a part of the channel's expanded college sports coverage. On September 9, 2007 Switzer joined the Fox NFL Pregame show. Switzer got into acting after coaching, playing the part of the head coach of the Prattville Pirates in the 1998 movie Possums. Switzer also guest-starred in an episode of TNT's Saving Grace titled "Do You Love Him?", which first aired August 11, 2008. In 2006, Switzer and Toby Keith helped found First Liberty Bank in Oklahoma City.[17] He owns Switzer's Locker Room, Switzer's Vineyards, and a number of other small businesses in the Norman area.

Head coaching record

College

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs Coaches# AP°
Oklahoma Sooners (Big Eight Conference) (1973–1988)
1973 Oklahoma 10–0–1 7–0 1st 2 3
1974 Oklahoma 11–0 7–0 1st 1
1975 Oklahoma 11–1 6–1 T–1st W Orange 1 1
1976 Oklahoma 9–2–1 5–2 T–1st W Fiesta 6 5
1977 Oklahoma 10–2 7–0 1st L Orange 6 7
1978 Oklahoma 11–1 6–1 T–1st W Orange 3 3
1979 Oklahoma 11–1 7–0 1st W Orange 3 3
1980 Oklahoma 10–2 7–0 1st W Orange 3 3
1981 Oklahoma 7–4–1 4–2–1 2nd W Sun 14 20
1982 Oklahoma 8–4 6–1 2nd L Fiesta 16 16
1983 Oklahoma 8–4 5–2 T–2nd
1984 Oklahoma 9–2–1 6–1 T–1st L Orange 6 6
1985 Oklahoma 11–1 7–0 1st W Orange 1 1
1986 Oklahoma 11–1 7–0 1st W Orange 3 3
1987 Oklahoma 11–1 7–0 1st L Orange 3 3
1988 Oklahoma 9–3 6–1 2nd L Florida Citrus 14 14
Oklahoma: 157–29–4 100–11–1
Total: 157–29–4
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

National Football League

Team Year Regular Season Post Season
Won Lost Ties Win % Finish Won Lost Win % Result
DAL 1994 12 4 0 .750 1st in NFC East 1 1 .500 Lost to the San Francisco 49ers in NFC Championship Game.
DAL 1995 12 4 0 .750 1st in NFC East 3 0 1.000 Super Bowl XXX champions.
DAL 1996 10 6 0 .625 1st in NFC East 1 1 .500 Lost to the Carolina Panthers in NFC Divisional Round.
DAL 1997 6 10 0 .375 4th in NFC East
Total[18] 40 24 0 .625 5 2 .714

Coaching tree

Head coaches under whom Switzer served:

Assistant coaches under Barry Switzer who became NCAA or NFL head coaches:

References

  1. ^ a b "Switzer Is Honored To Be Inducted". The New York Times. August 10, 2002. Retrieved April 17, 2007
  2. ^ a b c d e "Barry Switzer". The Arkansas Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Retrieved April 17, 2007.
  3. ^ Franks, Kenny. "Switzer, Barry Layne". Oklahoma Historical Society. Retrieved July 18, 2018.
  4. ^ Switzer v. Golden, 224 Arkansas 543; 274 S.W. 2d 769 (1955).
  5. ^ Bootlegger's Boy, William Morrow & Co., NYC, c. 1989, by Barry Switzer with Bud Shrake
  6. ^ Bootlegger's Boy, op. cit.
  7. ^ "Oklahoma Yearly Totals". Cfbdatawarehouse.com. Archived from the original on 2010-05-22. Retrieved 2012-10-07.
  8. ^ Martz, Ron (1979-11-28). "BIG RED: When OU fans go to games, it's like going to church". St. Petersburg Times. pp. 1C, 5C. Retrieved 2019-01-05.
  9. ^ https://www.sec.gov/news/speech/1986/062086grundfest.pdf#page=09
  10. ^ https://www.sec.gov/news/digest/1984/dig041084.pdf#page=02
  11. ^ Oklahoma has paid the price for anything goes Archived February 4, 2009, at the Wayback Machine, Sports Illustrated, 27 February 1989, retrieved 19 January 2009.
  12. ^ http://www.oklahomatexastickets.com/Okla-vs-texas-history-html
  13. ^ MIKE FREEMANPublished: August 05, 1997 (1997-08-05). "Switzer Arrested on Gun Charge". The New York Times. Retrieved 2012-10-07.
  14. ^ "Switzer enters guilty plea to gun charge 12/3/97 | Amarillo.com | Amarillo Globe-News". Amarillo.com. 1997-12-03. Retrieved 2012-10-07.
  15. ^ "Switzer out as Dallas coach Speculation centers on Seifert as next Cowboys field boss". The Baltimore Sun. 1998-01-10. Retrieved 2014-02-22.
  16. ^ "College Football Kicks Off on XM Satellite Radio with the ACC, Big East, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-10, and SEC" (Press release). XM Satellite Radio. 2007-02-15. Archived from the original on 2008-02-02. Retrieved 2007-09-19.
  17. ^ Don Mecoy (March 24, 2011). He also was in a scene of the 1999 movie Any Given Sunday."First Liberty Bank raises capital from some familiar names". NewsOK.com
  18. ^ "Barry Switzer Record, Statistics, and Category Ranks - Pro-Football-Reference.com". Pro-Football-Reference.com.

External links

1977 Oklahoma Sooners football team

The 1977 Oklahoma Sooners football team represented the University of Oklahoma in the 1977 NCAA Division I football season. Oklahoma was a member of the Big Eight Conference and played its home games in Oklahoma Memorial Stadium, where it has played its home games since 1923. The team posted a 10–2 overall record and a 7–0 conference record to earn the Conference title under head coach Barry Switzer who took the helm in 1973. This was Switzer's fifth conference title and third undefeated conference record in five seasons.The team was led by All-Americans George Cumby, Daryl Hunt, Reggie Kinlaw, and Zac Henderson Cumby was named Big Eight Defensive Player of the Year. After winning the conference title outright, it earned a trip to the Orange Bowl where it lost to Arkansas Razorbacks. During the season, it faced five ranked opponents (In order, #4 Ohio State, #5 Texas, #16 Iowa State, #11 Nebraska, and #6 Arkansas). Four of its opponents ended the season ranked. It endured its only regular season defeat in the Red River Shootout against Texas. The Sooners started the season with a four consecutive wins before losing to Texas and then won the next six before their unsuccessful bowl game.Elvis Peacock led the team in rushing with 812 yards, Dean Blevins led the team in passing with 385 yards, Steve Rhodes led the team in receiving with 272 yards, Uwe von Schamann led the team in scoring with 89 points, Hunt led the team in tackles with 159 tackles and Henderson posted 7 interceptions.

1979 Oklahoma Sooners football team

The 1979 Oklahoma Sooners football team represented the University of Oklahoma in the college football 1979 NCAA Division I-A season. Oklahoma Sooners football participated in the former Big Eight Conference at that time and played its home games in Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium where it has played its home games since 1923. The team posted an 11–1 overall record and a 7–0 conference record to earn the Conference title outright under head coach Barry Switzer who took the helm in 1973. This was Switzer's seventh conference title and fourth undefeated conference record in seven seasons.The team was led by All-Americans Billy Sims and George Cumby. After winning the conference title outright, it earned a trip to the Orange Bowl for a bout with Florida State. During the season, it faced three different ranked opponents (In order, #4 Texas, #3 Nebraska and #4 Florida State). All three of these opponents finished the season ranked. It endured its only defeat of the season against Texas in the Red River Shootout. The Sooners started the season with a four consecutive wins before losing to Texas and then won their remaining seven games. Sims and J.C. Watts both posted for 100-yard games in the Orange Bowl.Sims led the nation in scoring with 138 points (based on per game average of 12.0, which includes 132 in 11 games). Sims led the team in rushing with 1670 yards, Watts led the team in passing with 821 yards, Freddie Nixon led the team in receiving with 293 yards, Cumby led the team with 160 tackles and Bud Hebert posted 4 interceptions. Billy Sims set numerous Oklahoma offensive records that still stand including career 200-yard games, single-season rushing touchdowns (tied)

1980 Oklahoma Sooners football team

The 1980 Oklahoma Sooners football team represented the University of Oklahoma in the 1980 NCAA Division I-A football season. Oklahoma was a member of the Big Eight Conference and played its home games in Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium, where it has played its home games since 1923. The team posted a 10–2 overall record and a 7–0 conference record to earn the Conference title outright under head coach Barry Switzer who took the helm in 1973. This was Switzer's eighth conference title and fifth undefeated conference record in eight seasons.The team was led by All-Americans Terry Crouch, and Louis Oubre, After winning the conference title outright, it earned a trip to the Orange Bowl for a rematch with Florida State. During the season, it faced four ranked opponents (In order, #3 Texas, #6 North Carolina, #4 Nebraska and #2 Florida State). The last three of these opponents finished the season ranked. It endured two early season losses against Stanford and Texas in the Red River Shootout. The Sooners finished the season with an eight consecutive wins.David Overstreet led the team in rushing with 720 yards, J.C. Watts led the team in passing with 1037 yards, Bobby Grayson led the team in receiving with 389 yards, Watts led the team in scoring with 108 points, Mike Coats led the team with 126 tackles and Gary Lowell posted 4 interceptions.

The team set the current school records of 82 points and 875 total yards against Colorado.

1981 Oklahoma Sooners football team

The 1981 Oklahoma Sooners football team represented the University of Oklahoma during the 1981 NCAA Division I-A football season. They played their home games at Oklahoma Memorial Stadium and competed as members of the Big Eight Conference. They were coached by head coach Barry Switzer. The Sooners defeated the Houston Cougars 40–14 to win the 1981 Sun Bowl in El Paso, Texas.

1982 Oklahoma Sooners football team

The 1982 Oklahoma Sooners football team represented the University of Oklahoma during the 1982 NCAA Division I-A football season. They played their home games at Oklahoma Memorial Stadium and competed as members of the Big Eight Conference. They were coached by head coach Barry Switzer. The Sooners lost to Arizona State 21–32 in the Fiesta Bowl in Tempe, Arizona.

1983 Oklahoma Sooners football team

The 1983 Oklahoma Sooners football team represented the University of Oklahoma during the 1983 NCAA Division I-A football season. They played their home games at Oklahoma Memorial Stadium and competed as members of the Big Eight Conference. They were led by head coach Barry Switzer.

1988 Orange Bowl

The 1988 Orange Bowl was an American college football bowl game between the Miami Hurricanes and the Oklahoma Sooners. It was the 54th edition of the Orange Bowl and took place at the Orange Bowl stadium in Miami, Florida on January 1, 1988. Miami was coached by Jimmy Johnson and Oklahoma was coached by Barry Switzer. Miami won the game, 20–14. To date, it is the only time the opposing head coaches from a college national championship football game each later served as head coach of the same professional football team, and won the Super Bowl with that team, that team being the Dallas Cowboys.

1994 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1994 Dallas Cowboys season was the franchise's 35th season in the National Football League and was the first year under head coach Barry Switzer. Following their second consecutive Super Bowl title, the Cowboys would see a multitude of changes. In March, months of setbacks finally reached its climax as team owner Jerry Jones and head coach Jimmy Johnson held a press conference and announced Johnson's resignation.

After a continuous run of dominance in the regular season and finishing with a record of 12–4, the Cowboys fell short of a record third straight Super Bowl title with a loss to the 49ers in the NFC Championship game. The 1994 Cowboys draft yielded only one notable addition to the team, offensive guard Larry Allen and veteran linebacker Ken Norton Jr. left the team to sign with San Francisco.

This season was also the 75th anniversary of the NFL and was designated by a diamond-shaped patch worn on the left breast of every NFL team's uniform. The Cowboys celebrated the league's history by donning their inaugural white jerseys from the 1960–1963 seasons against the Detroit Lions. The team also later debuted a special white "Double-Star" jersey on Thanksgiving Day 1994. These uniforms celebrated the Cowboys' most recent back-to-back Super Bowl titles in the 1992 and 1993 seasons and were used in most of the Cowboys' remaining games of the season, including the playoffs.

1995 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1995 Dallas Cowboys season was the franchise's 36th season in the National Football League and was the second year under head coach Barry Switzer and final of the three Super Bowl titles they would win during 1992 to 1995. Dallas would be the first team to ever win three Super Bowls in a span of four seasons. Switzer guided the Cowboys to a fifth Super Bowl victory by defeating the Pittsburgh Steelers in Super Bowl XXX. As of 2018, this is the last time the Cowboys appeared in the NFC Championship Game, and in turn, their last Super Bowl appearance.

1995 Pro Bowl

The 1995 Pro Bowl was the NFL's all-star game for the 1994 season. The game was played on February 5, 1995, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final Score was AFC 41, NFC 13. This was the AFC's largest margin of victory since the AFL-NFL merger. Rookie Marshall Faulk of the Indianapolis Colts rushed for a Pro Bowl record 180 yards and was the game's MVP. Chris Warren added 127 yards rushing as the AFC posted records for rushing yards (400) and total yards (552). Both Warren and Faulk broke the Pro Bowl rushing record, formerly held by O.J. Simpson.The coaches were Dallas’ Barry Switzer and Bill Cowher of the Pittsburgh Steelers. The game was viewed by 49,121 at Aloha Stadium. The referee was Larry Nemmers.

1996 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1996 Dallas Cowboys season was the franchise's 37th season in the National Football League and was the third year under head coach Barry Switzer. Following their victory in Super Bowl XXX, the Cowboys endured a rough year failing to improve their 12-4 record from 1995 but still reached the playoffs with a 10-6 record. Star receiver Michael Irvin was suspended by the league for the first five games and before the playoffs were accused with lineman Erik Williams of sexual assault. Controversy also took place when writer Skip Bayless published a scathing account of the Cowboys' 1995 season. Longtime trainer Mike Woicik also left the team after the season following a sideline dispute with coach Barry Switzer although Woicik returned in 2011.

This season would be the last season the Cowboys won a playoff game until 2009, and since their Super Bowl win the previous season, the Cowboys never made it past the divisional round as of 2018.

1997 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1997 Dallas Cowboys season was the franchise's 38th season in the National Football League and was the fourth year under head coach Barry Switzer. The team failed to improve on their 10-6 record from 1996 and suffered a losing season and missed the playoffs for the first time since 1990, due to this they lost their last five games and finished at 6–10.

Barry Switzer Center

The Barry Switzer Center, on the University of Oklahoma campus in Norman, Oklahoma, houses football offices, the football locker room, equipment room, the Siegfried Strength and Conditioning Complex, the Freede Sports Medicine Facility and the Touchdown Club Legends Lobby. The Center is located at the south end of the Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium. The Barry Switzer Center, dedicated on April 24, 1999, was named after OU’s all-time winningest head football coach. During Summer 2015 the Switzer Center was demolished as part of the expansion of Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium. In Barry Switzer’s 16 seasons as the Oklahoma Sooners head football coach, the team won three national championships, 12 Big Eight Conference championships and eight bowl games in 13 appearances.

Jimmy Johnson (American football coach)

James William Johnson (born July 16, 1943) is an American football broadcaster and former player, coach, and executive.

He served as the head football coach at Oklahoma State University–Stillwater from 1979 to 1983 and the University of Miami from 1984 to 1988. Johnson then moved to the National Football League (NFL), serving as head coach of the Dallas Cowboys from 1989 to 1993, winning two Super Bowls with the team (both against the Buffalo Bills), and finally serving as head coach of the Miami Dolphins from 1996 to 1999. As of 2016, he is an analyst for Fox NFL Sunday, the Fox network's NFL pregame show for the NFL games.

Johnson was the first and one of only three football coaches to lead teams to both a major college football championship and a Super Bowl victory, the others being Barry Switzer and Pete Carroll.

Johnson's coaching tree includes a number of future head coaches such as Butch Davis, Norv Turner, Tommy Tuberville, Dave Campo, and Dave Wannstedt. In 1993, Johnson wrote Turning the Thing Around: My Life in Football, ghostwritten by Ed Hinton. Johnson Thomas Jefferson High School, later renamed Memorial High School, where two of his classmates were future rock icon Janis Joplin and actor G. W. Bailey.Johnson attended college at the University of Arkansas and played on the Arkansas Razorbacks football team, where he was an all-Southwest Conference defensive lineman for coach Frank Broyles and a teammate of future Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones. Other teammates included Ken Hatfield, Jim Lindsey, Ronnie Caveness, and Loyd Phillips. Several future head coaches were assistant coaches for Broyles and the Razorbacks during Johnson's career in Fayetteville: Hayden Fry, Johnny Majors, and Barry Switzer. The 1964 Razorbacks squad went undefeated and was recognized as a national champion by the Football Writers Association of America. Johnson was nicknamed "Jimmy Jumpup" because he never stayed down on the ground for long during football practices or games.

John Roush (American football)

John Roush (born January 7, 1953) is a former American football player. He attended the University of Oklahoma and played at the offensive guard position for the Oklahoma Sooners football team and was a member of the 1974 team coached by Barry Switzer that compiled an 11–0 record and won the national championship. He was also a consensus first-team selection to the 1974 College Football All-America Team. He was also an Academic All-America selection in 1974.

List of Dallas Cowboys head coaches

The Dallas Cowboys are a professional American football team based in Frisco, Texas. Their stadium is located in Arlington, Texas. They are members of the Eastern Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The Cowboys franchise was founded in 1960 as an expansion team. The team played their games in the Cotton Bowl from 1960 to 1970, then in Texas Stadium from 1971 to 2008, and AT&T Stadium from 2009 to present.

There have been eight head coaches for the Dallas Cowboys. Three coaches have won Super Bowls with the team: Tom Landry in Super Bowl VI and XII, Jimmy Johnson in Super Bowl XXVII and XXVIII, and Barry Switzer in Super Bowl XXX. Landry is the team's all-time leader in games coached and wins, and Switzer leads all coaches in winning percentage with .625. Dave Campo is the only Cowboys coach with a losing record (.313), and is also the only coach in franchise history to have never posted a winning season. The team's first coach, Tom Landry, has been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. The current coach is Jason Garrett who replaced Wade Phillips on November 8, 2010.

List of Oklahoma Sooners bowl games

The Oklahoma Sooners college football team competes as part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), representing the University of Oklahoma in the Big 12 Conference. Since the establishment of the team in 1895, OU has appeared in 50 bowl games and has a record of 29 victories, 22 losses, and one tie. Oklahoma is one of only two schools to have appeared in all five of the BCS era bowl games (2001 Orange, 2003 Rose, 2004 Sugar, 2007 Fiesta, 2009 BCS NCG), with the other being Ohio State. Oklahoma's 29 bowl victories currently ranks as 4th all time among college football programs for most bowl wins. Oklahoma also ranks 7th in most bowl appearances.

List of Oklahoma Sooners head football coaches

The Oklahoma Sooners football program is a college football team that represents the University of Oklahoma. The team has had 22 head coaches since organized football began in 1895. The Sooners have played in more than 1,200 games in its 121 seasons. In those seasons, nine coaches have led the Sooners to postseason bowl games: Thomas E. Stidham, Jim Tatum, Bud Wilkinson, Gomer Jones, Chuck Fairbanks, Barry Switzer, Gary Gibbs, Bob Stoops and Lincoln Riley. Nine coaches have won conference championships with the Sooners: Bennie Owen, Stidham, Dewey Luster, Tatum, Wilkinson, Fairbanks, Switzer, Stoops and Riley. Wilkinson, Switzer and Stoops have also won national championships with the Sooners. Stoops is the all-time leader in games coached and won, Owen is the all-time leader in years coached, while Switzer is the all-time leader in winning percentage. John Harts is, in terms of winning percentage, the worst coach the Sooners have had as he lost the only game he coached. John Blake has the lowest winning percentage of those who have coached more than one game with .353 in his 34 games.

Of the 22 Sooner coaches, Owen, Lawrence Jones, Tatum, Wilkinson and Switzer have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. Wilkinson, Switzer, and Stoops have each received National Coach of the Year honors from at least one organization. The current coach is Lincoln Riley, who replaced Bob Stoops when he stepped down on June 7, 2017.

Oklahoma Sooners football

The Oklahoma Sooners football program is a college football team that represents the University of Oklahoma (variously "Oklahoma" or "OU"). The team is a member of the Big 12 Conference, which is in Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (formerly Division I-A) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The program began in 1895 and is one of the most successful programs since World War II with the most wins (606) and the highest winning percentage (.762) since 1945. The program has 7 national championships, 48 conference championships, 162 First Team All-Americans (80 consensus), and seven Heisman Trophy winners. In addition, the school has had 23 members (five coaches and 18 players) inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame and holds the record for the longest winning streak in Division I history with 47 straight victories. Oklahoma is also the only program that has had four coaches with 100+ wins. They became the sixth NCAA FBS team to win 850 games when they defeated the Kansas Jayhawks on November 22, 2014. The Sooners play their home games at Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium in Norman, Oklahoma. Lincoln Riley is currently the team's head coach.

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