Barry Helton

Barry Bret Helton (born January 2, 1965) is a former American college and professional football player who was a punter in the National Football League (NFL) for four seasons during the 1980s and 1990s. He played college football for the University of Colorado, and earned All-American honors. He played professionally for the San Francisco 49ers and Los Angeles Rams of the NFL, and played in Super Bowl XXIII and Super Bowl XXIV for the 49ers.

Helton was born in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He attended the University of Colorado, where he played for the Colorado Buffaloes football team from 1984 to 1987.

Helton's son Bret is also a professional athlete, pitching in the Pittsburgh Pirates' minor league system.[1]

Barry Helton
No. 9
Position:Punter
Personal information
Born:January 2, 1965 (age 54)
Colorado Springs, Colorado
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:205 lb (93 kg)
Career information
High school:Simla High School
Simla, Colorado
College:Colorado
NFL Draft:1988 / Round: 4 / Pick: 102
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Punts:213
Punting yards:8,285
Longest punt:56
Average punt:38.9
Player stats at PFR

References

  1. ^ Summers, Danny. "Faces to Follow: Luke Martin and Bret Helton", Cheyenne Edition, 2/27/2019.
1985 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1985 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1985 NCAA Division I-A football season. The selectors for the 1985 season included the Associated Press (AP) and United Press International (UPI).

1985 College Football All-America Team

The 1985 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1985. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes five selectors as "official" for the 1985 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA); (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers; and (5) the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC). Other selectors included Football News (FN), Gannett News Service (GNS), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), Pro Football Weekly, Scripps Howard (SH), and The Sporting News (TSN).

Ten players were unanimously selected as first-team All-Americans by all five official selectors. They are:

Bo Jackson, Auburn running back who rushed for 1,786 yards and won the 1985 Heisman Trophy;

Chuck Long, Iowa quarterback who won the 1985 Davey O'Brien Award and Maxwell Award and placed second in the 1985 Heisman Trophy voting;

Lorenzo White, Michigan State running back who became the first Big Ten Conference player to rush for over 2,000 yards and placed fourth in the 1985 Heisman Trophy voting;

Brian Bosworth, Oklahoma linebacker who won the 1985 Dick Butkus Award;

David Williams, Illinois wide receiver who caught 85 passes for 1,047 yards and finished his college career as the second leading receiver in NCAA history;

Larry Station, Iowa linebacker who led the team in tackles for the fourth straight season with 129;

John Lee, UCLA placekicker who set the NCAA record for highest percentage of extra points and field goals made in a career with 93.3% (116 of 117 PATs, 79 of 92 FGs);

Jim Dombrowski, Virginia offensive tackle;

Leslie O'Neal, Oklahoma defensive end; and

Tim Green, Syracuse defensive end.

1985 Freedom Bowl

The 1985 Freedom Bowl was a college football postseason bowl game played on December 30, 1985, in Anaheim, California. It matched the Washington Huskies of the Pacific-10 Conference and the Colorado Buffaloes of the Big Eight Conference.

1986 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1986 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1986 NCAA Division I-A football season. The selectors for the 1986 season included the Associated Press (AP) and the United Press International (UPI).

1986 College Football All-America Team

The 1986 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1986. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes five selectors as "official" for the 1986 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA); (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers; and (5) the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC). Other notable selectors included Football News the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), Scripps Howard (SH), and The Sporting News (TSN).

1987 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1987 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1987 NCAA Division I-A football season. The selectors for the 1987 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1987 College Football All-America Team

The 1987 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1987. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes five selectors as "official" for the 1987 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA); (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers; and (5) the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC). Other notable selectors included Football News the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), Scripps Howard (SH), and The Sporting News (TSN).

1987 Colorado Buffaloes football team

The 1987 Colorado Buffaloes football team represented the University of Colorado at Boulder during the 1987 NCAA Division I-A football season.

1988 NFL Draft

The 1988 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 24–25, 1988, at the Marriot Marquis in New York City, New York. The league also held a supplemental draft after the regular draft and before the regular season.

Notably, the first player selected at the quarterback position did not come until the third round (76th overall), which is the last draft in which this has occurred. In fact, only one draft since – 1996 – has gone without a quarterback being drafted in the first round.

1988 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1988 San Francisco 49ers season was their 43rd season in the National Football League. The season was highlighted by their third Super Bowl victory. In 1988, the 49ers struggled. At one point, they were 6–5 and in danger of missing the playoffs but rose to defeat the Washington Redskins on a Monday night, eventually finishing the season at 10–6. They gained a measure of revenge by thrashing the Minnesota Vikings 34–9 in the first round. The 49ers then traveled to Chicago's Soldier Field, where the chill factor at gametime was 26 degrees below zero. They defeated the Chicago Bears 28–3 in the NFC Championship.

For the 49ers, it was their first Super Bowl appearance since they defeated the Miami Dolphins in Super Bowl XIX. They had made the playoffs in the three seasons between Super Bowl XIX and Super Bowl XXIII, but were eliminated each time in the first round, primarily because of the poor performances by their offensive stars in those games; quarterback Joe Montana, receiver Jerry Rice and running back Roger Craig all failed to produce a single touchdown.

The 49ers alternated quarterbacks as Montana and Steve Young both started at various points of the season. The broadcast booth of the 49ers radio network also saw change, as Joe Starkey substituted for longtime 49ers play by play announcer Lon Simmons during several games, mostly in October when Simmons called the Oakland Athletics 1988 American League Championship Series and 1988 World Series games for the Oakland A's flagship station, KSFO–AM. The 1988 season was the last for Simmons as 49ers broadcaster. With the regular season and postseason, the 49ers compiled a total of 13 victories (a .684 win percentage) on the season, a record-low for Super Bowl champions. In 2011, the New York Giants would tie this record (but with a .650 win percentage as they suffered seven losses as opposed to the 49ers six).

1990 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1990 San Francisco 49ers season was the franchise's 41st season in the National Football League and their 45th overall. the team entered the 1990 season heavily favoured to win their third consecutive Super Bowl. The season was highlighted by their defeat of the New York Giants on Monday Night Football in Week 13. Throughout the season, the 49ers and the Giants were the two best teams in the NFL. The two teams would meet again in the NFC Championship Game.

This was the season the 49ers debut the stitched up authentic name and numbers on jerseys.

Between 1988 and 1990, the 49ers set a league record with 18 consecutive road victories. Jerry Rice had a career year by becoming the fourth receiver in the history of American football to have at least 100 receptions in one season. The 49ers won their fifth consecutive NFC West Division Title. Dating back to 1989, the 49ers completed a fifteen-game unbeaten streak in the regular season (5 victories in the last 5 games of 1989 and 10 victories in the first ten games of 1990).

The 49ers were the closest team in NFL history to "three peat" in the Super Bowl, losing in the final seconds on a field goal by the Giants in the NFC Championship Game. The season ended on quite a haunting note, because the Giants' Leonard Marshall made a devastating hit on 49er quarterback Joe Montana, knocking him out of the game. Subsequent to this, Giant nose tackle Erik Howard fought through a double-team block by 49er center Jesse Sapolu and 49er guard Guy McIntyre to force 49er running back Roger Craig to fumble by getting his helmet on the football with only a few minutes left while the 49ers were driving to run out the game clock. Erik Howard dropped to one knee and managed to turn his shoulders perpendicular to the line of scrimmage in an effort to neutralize the double-team block. 49er guard Guy McIntyre released from the double-team block on Erik Howard in order to attempt a block on onrushing Giant inside linebacker Pepper Johnson allowing Erik Howard to knife through the protection and lay a hit on 49er running back Roger Craig. The ball was recovered by Giant outside linebacker Lawrence Taylor after he beat a block at the line of scrimmage by 49er tight end Brent Jones and a subsequent block by 49er fullback Tom Rathman to position himself just behind where Roger Craig was located along the line of scrimmage to catch the football after Giant nose tackle Erik Howard's hit forced it out of Craig's grasp. The Giants took over possession and began driving to kick the game-winning field goal. They ended up winning 15–13. The words of announcer Pat Summerall, "There will be no three-peat!" still haunt 49ers fans.

Following the 1990 season, the 49ers left team stalwarts Roger Craig and Ronnie Lott unprotected and let them go to the Los Angeles Raiders via Plan B free agency. Joe Montana would remain on the 49ers' roster for the next two seasons, but would never start another game for the 49ers.

1991 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1991 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 54th year with the National Football League and the 46th season in Los Angeles. The team was looking to improve on its 5-11 record from 1990. However, the Rams finished the 1991 season 3-13, tied for the second worst record in the NFL with the Cincinnati Bengals and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. After splitting their first 6 games, the Rams lost their final 10 games of the season, their longest losing streak to end a season since 1937, when the team was in Cleveland, when the team lost 9 in a row to end that season. The 3-13 record was the worst for the Rams in Los Angeles for a 16-game schedule and they tied the third-fewest posted by the team in its tenure in the city. This was also, at the time, the worst record for the Rams in a 16-game schedule overall (not including the 1982 strike-shortened season).

The 1991 Rams' pass defense surrendered 7.86 yards-per-pass attempt (including quarterback sacks), the fourth-most in the history of the league.

Big Eight Conference football

The Big Eight Conference is a defunct college athletic conference that was formerly affiliated with the NCAA's Division I-A (now known as FBS).

The Big Eight Conference was a successful football conference, with its member schools being recognized as consensus national champion on eleven occasions, including the last two football seasons the conference existed (1994 and 1995). Seven players from the Big Eight won the Heisman Trophy, the most prestigious national award for college football players.

Colorado Buffaloes football

The Colorado Buffaloes football program represents the University of Colorado Boulder in college football at the NCAA Division I FBS level. The team is currently a member of the Pac-12 Conference, having previously been a charter member of the Big 12 Conference. Before joining the Big 12, they were members of the Big Eight Conference. The CU football team has played at Folsom Field since 1924. The Buffs all-time record is 694–493–36 (.583 winning percentage) prior to the Valero Alamo Bowl at the end of the 2016 season. Colorado won a National Championship in 1990. The football program is 23rd on the all-time win list and 30th in all-time winning percentage.

List of Colorado Buffaloes in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Colorado Buffaloes football players in the NFL Draft.

List of San Francisco 49ers players

These players have appeared in at least one regular season or postseason game for the San Francisco 49ers NFL franchise.

List of people from Colorado Springs, Colorado

The city of Colorado Springs, the second-largest city in Colorado and the county seat of El Paso County, Colorado, United States, has been the birthplace and home of several notable individuals. This list of people from Colorado Springs includes people that were born or lived in the city or greater metropolitan area. Individuals included in this list are people presumed to be notable because they have received significant coverage in reliable sources that are independent of the subject.

Simla, Colorado

Simla is a statutory town in Elbert County, Colorado, United States. It is 48 miles (77 km) northeast of Colorado Springs. The population was 618 at the 2010 United States Census.

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Offense
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