Barony (county division)

A barony is an administrative division of a county in Scotland, Ireland and outlying parts of England. It has a lower rank and importance than a county.

Origin

A geographic barony is a remnant from mediaeval times of the area of land held under the form of feudal land tenure termed feudal barony, or barony by tenure, either an English feudal barony, a Scottish feudal barony or an Irish feudal barony, which all operated under different legal and social systems. Just as modern counties are no longer under the administrative control of a noble count or earl, geographic baronies are generally no longer connected with feudal barons, certainly not in England where such tenure was abolished with the whole feudal system by the Tenures Abolition Act 1660. The position in Scotland is more complex, although the legal force of the Scottish feudal baron was abolished early in the 21st century.[1]

Surviving examples

England

Two divisions of the county of Westmorland in England:

Scotland

Ireland

Norway

See also

References

  1. ^ P. G. B. McNeill and H. L. MacQueen, eds, Atlas of Scottish History to 1707 (University of Edinburgh: Edinburgh, 1996), pp. 201-7
Barony

Barony may refer to:

Barony, the peerage or office of a baron

Barony, the title and land held in fealty by a feudal baron

Barony (county division), a geographical region

Barony (Ireland), a historical subdivision of the Irish counties

Barony, Lanarkshire, the parish of Barony Hall, now part of Glasgow

Callan (barony)

Callan (Irish: Callainn, meaning "Callow land") is a barony in the western part of County Kilkenny, Ireland.It is one of 12 baronies in County Kilkenny. The size of the barony is 22.9 square kilometres (8.8 sq mi). Unusually for a barony, it contains only two civil parishes which together comprise 65 townlands. The chief town is Callan. The barony is bordered by the baronies of Shillelogher to the north (whose chief town is Bennettsbridge) and by Kells to the south (whose chief town is Kells). Notable features of the barony include Callan Motte and Callan Augustinian Friary. The N76 road bisects the barony.

Cranagh (barony)

Crannagh (Irish: Crannach, meaning "Abounding in Trees, or Woodland"), sometimes written Cranagh or Granagh, is a barony in the north west of County Kilkenny, Ireland. The size of the barony is 210.8 square kilometres (81.4 sq mi). There are 19 civil parishes in Crannagh, made up of 182 townlands. The chief town Freshford, with highest point at Clomantagh Hill.

Crannagh lies at the north west of the county, with the baronies of Galmoy and Fassadinin to the north (whose chief towns are Galmoy and Castlecomer), and the barony of the Kilkenny to the east (whose chief town is Kilkenny) and Shillelogher to the south (whose chief town is Bennettsbridge). It is buffers County Tipperary on the west. The R693 road crosses the barony.

Fassadinin

Fassadinin (Irish: Fásach an Deighnín, meaning "Wilderness along the River Dinin"), sometimes written Fassadining, is a barony in the north of County Kilkenny, Ireland. The size of the barony is 276.2 square kilometres (106.6 sq mi). There are 19 civil parishes in Fassadinin. The chief town today is Castlecomer. Foulksrath Castle and Kells Priory are located in Fassadinin. The N78 Kilkenny/Athy road bisects the barony.

Fassadinin lies at the north of the county, with the baronies of Galmoy and Crannagh to the west (whose chief towns is are Galmoy and Freshford), and the baronies of the Kilkenny and Gowran to the south (whose chief towns is are Kilkenny and Gowran). It is surrounded on two sides by counties Laois to the north and Carlow to the east.

Feudal baron

A feudal baron is a vassal holding a heritable fief called a barony, comprising a specific portion of land, granted by an overlord in return for allegiance and service. Following the end of European feudalism, feudal baronies have largely been superseded by baronies held as a rank of nobility, without any attachment to a fief. However, in Scotland, the feudal dignity of baron remains in existence, and may be bought and sold independently of the land to which it was formerly attached.

Galmoy (barony)

Galmoy (Irish: Gabhalmhaigh) is a barony in County Kilkenny, Ireland. It had been established by 1672. A barony is an historical geographical unit of land and Galmoy is one of 12 baronies that make up the county. While it is named after the village of Galmoy, today the chief town of the barony is Urlingford. It lies at the north-western corner of the county between Fassadinin to the east (whose chief town is Castlecomer), and Crannagh to the south (whose chief town is Freshford). It is surrounded on two sides by counties Tipperary to the west and Laois to the north. The M8 Dublin/Cork motorway bisects the barony. It is situated 121 kilometres (75 mi) from Dublin city and 131 kilometres (81 mi) from Cork city.

The barony was part of in the historic kingdom of Osraige (Ossory). Today it is part of the Roman Catholic Church diocese of Ossory and the Church of Ireland diocese of Cashel and Ossory. Galmoy is currently administered by Kilkenny County Council.

Ida (barony)

Ida (Irish: Uí Dheá) is a barony in the south-east of County Kilkenny, Ireland. It is one of 12 baronies in County Kilkenny. There are 16 civil parishes made up of 191 townlands in Ida. The chief town is Slieveroe. The size of the barony is 249.8 square kilometres (96.4 sq mi) with highest point at Tory Hill.

Ida lies at the south-east of the county, with the barony of Gowran to the north (whose chief town is Gowran ), Iverk and Knocktopher to the west (whose chief towns are Piltown and Knocktopher), and the barony of Kilculliheen to the south. County Waterford is located to the east of the barony. The N25 crosses the barony.

Kells (County Kilkenny barony)

Kells (Irish: Ceanannas, meaning "head fort, seat or residence") is a barony in the south-west of County Kilkenny, Ireland. It is one of 12 baronies in County Kilkenny. The size of the barony is 155.6 square kilometres (60.1 sq mi). There are 10 civil parishes in Kells, made up of 167 townlands. The chief town is Kells.Kells lies to the south-west of the county, with the baronies of Callan and Shillelogher to the north (whose chief towns are Callan and Bennettsbridge), and the baronies of Iverk and Knocktopher to the south (whose chief towns are Piltown and Knocktopher). It has a border with County Tipperary on the west.

The barony was part of the territory of the Ua Glóiairn clan of Callann, and in the historic kingdom of Osraige (Ossory). Kells Priory is located in the barony. Today it is part of the Roman Catholic Church diocese of Ossory and the Church of Ireland diocese of Cashel and Ossory. Kells is currently administered by Kilkenny County Council.

Kilculliheen

Kilculliheen (Irish: Cill Choilchín) is a civil parish, electoral division and barony in Ireland, on the north bank of the River Suir across from the centre of Waterford City. Historically, it has been transferred several times between the county of the city of Waterford and the counties of Kilkenny and Waterford. It now contains the only part of Waterford city on the left bank of the River Suir. The Parliamentary Gazetteer of 1846 states "as it lies on the left bank of the Suir, which, for the most part, divides co. Waterford from co. Kilkenny, most topographists mistakingly assign it to the barony of Ida, co. Kilkenny". It is now partly in County Kilkenny and partly in Waterford City. Of the barony's eleven townlands, five (Belmount, Ballinvoher, Newtown, Ballyrobin, and Rathculliheen) are entirely in Kilkenny and six (Abbeylands, Christendom, Mountmisery, Mountsion, Newrath, and Rockshire) are split between Kilkenny and Waterford. The city portion contains the former village of Ferrybank, which gives its name to a wider suburb which has spread across the county boundary.

Lists of baronies

Lists of baronies include:

List of baronies in the peerages of Britain and Ireland

List of Polish noble families with the title of Baron

List of baronies in Portugal

Designations for types of administrative territorial entities

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