Barbara Broccoli

Barbara Dana Broccoli OBE (born June 18, 1960) is an American film producer known for her work on the James Bond film series.

Barbara Broccoli
Daniel Craig and Barbara Broccoli (cropped)
Barbara Broccoli (right) with Daniel Craig at the premiere of Spectre
Born
Barbara Dana Broccoli

June 18, 1960 (age 58)[1]
ResidenceLondon, England, UK[2][3]
NationalityAmerican, British[2]
OccupationFilm producer

Personal life

Broccoli is the daughter of the James Bond producer Albert R. "Cubby" Broccoli and actress Dana Wilson Broccoli (born Dana Natol). In 1995, Cubby Broccoli handed over control of Eon Productions, the production company responsible for the James Bond series of films, to Barbara and her half-brother Michael G. Wilson; they continue to run the company as of 2018.[4] Barbara became President of the National Youth Theatre[5] after the success of their 60th Anniversary Diamond Gala at Shaftesbury Theatre in 2016.

Broccoli married and divorced director and film producer Frederick M. Zollo.[3] She was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth II in the 2008 New Year Honours. In 2014 she was selected as a member of the jury for the 64th Berlin International Film Festival.[6]

Career

James Bond franchise

Broccoli started in the Bond franchise at the age of 17, working in the publicity department of The Spy Who Loved Me. Six years later, she became an assistant director on 1983's Octopussy. Soon after, she progressed to become an associate producer of the film The Living Daylights in 1987.[7]

However, her most notable role has been as a producer of the Bond films starring Pierce Brosnan and later Daniel Craig.[8]

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang

Following her father's death in 1996, Broccoli worked with London theatre producer Michael Rose, to create the stage musical version of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang based on the 1968 musical film starring Dick Van Dyke and Sally Ann Howes. Broccoli rehired the original songwriters from the film to write the new material for the stage version. The Sherman Brothers wrote five new songs for the show which debuted on April 16, 2002. The show ran at the London Palladium and was the most financially successful show to have ever played there, breaking numerous other impressive records.

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang later transferred to Broadway, but was considered a failure, receiving poor reviews and playing just 319 performances, closing with the loss of a large proportion of the initial $15m investment. The musical has toured extensively in the UK and in Asia, with a revised version of the show touring the United States in 2008.

Chariots of Fire (2012 stage play)

Broccoli co-produced Chariots of Fire, the stage adaptation of the film of the same title. Broccoli's involvement with Chariots of Fire extends back to 1980, when she introduced her friend Dodi Fayed to the screenplay. He later co-financed the film and became its executive producer.[9] She co-produced the play along with Hugh Hudson, who directed the 1981 Oscar-winning film.

Other stage play productions

Filmography

Assistant director

Associate producer

Producer

References

  1. ^ "MI6: The Home of James Bond". MI6-HQ.com. Retrieved November 14, 2015.
  2. ^ a b "New Year's Honours 2008: CSV". GOV.UK. 25 March 2015.
  3. ^ a b Barnes, Brooks (November 6, 2015). "A Family Team Looks for James Bond's Next Assignment". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 14, 2015.
  4. ^ Barnes, Brooks (November 6, 2015). "A Family Team Looks for James Bond's Next Assignment". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 14, 2015.
  5. ^ National Youth Theatre
  6. ^ "Berlinale 2014: International Jury". Berlinale.de (in German). Retrieved December 31, 2013.
  7. ^ Priggé, Steven (2004). Movie moguls speak: interviews with top film producers. McFarland Publishing. p. 17. ISBN 9780786419296.
  8. ^ Masters, Tim (October 24, 2012). "Skyfall premiere is biggest and best – Daniel Craig". BBC. Barbara Broccoli, who co-produces the Bond films with Michael G. Wilson, said Skyfall was 'classic Bond but with a contemporary feel'
  9. ^ Jury, Louise. "Chariots of Fire Will Run in West End... to Honour Dodi Fayed". London Evening Standard, April 19, 2012.

External links

Albert R. Broccoli

Albert Romolo Broccoli (April 5, 1909 – June 27, 1996), nicknamed "Cubby", was an American film producer who made more than 40 motion pictures throughout his career. Most of the films were made in the United Kingdom and often filmed at Pinewood Studios. Co-founder of Danjaq, LLC and Eon Productions, Broccoli is most notable as the producer of many of the James Bond films. He and Harry Saltzman saw the films develop from relatively low-budget origins to large-budget, high-grossing extravaganzas, and Broccoli's heirs continue to produce new Bond films.

Aston Martin DB10

The Aston Martin DB10 is a bespoke two-door concept car specially created for the James Bond film Spectre by the British car manufacturer Aston Martin.

The car was unveiled by Sam Mendes and Barbara Broccoli, the director and producer of Spectre respectively, the 24th James Bond film from Eon Productions. The unveiling took place as part of the official press launch of the film on the 007 Stage at Pinewood Studios, near London, on 4 December 2014. Mendes introduced the car as "the first cast member." The film featured the Aston Martin DB10 as James Bond's car.

Shortly after the unveiling ceremony in Pinewood Studios, Aston Martin also took part in the launch of the Bond in Motion exhibition at the London Film Museum in Covent Garden, London. The car manufacturer celebrated their fifty-year partnership with Bond films franchise, which started with the DB5 being used in the 1964 film Goldfinger.The design of the DB10 was led by Aston Martin's chief creative officer Marek Reichman, with the film's director Mendes working closely with the team. The car was developed specifically for the film and ten units were hand-built in-house by the company's design and engineering teams in Gaydon. Eight of those 10 cars were featured in the movie, and two more were built for promotional purposes. Aston Martin stated that "the DB10 gives a glimpse to the future design direction for the next generation of Aston Martins." It was later revealed that the DB10 was based on the newly introduced V8 Vantage that made its debut in 2017.As of December 2014, Aston Martin had released few of the technical details of the car, but they have revealed that it will feature the company's 6-speed manual transmission unit that is used on their V8-engined cars. The car's chassis is based on a modified version of the VH Generation II platform that underpins the V8 Vantage. However the DB10 has a longer wheelbase and is nearly as wide as the One-77. It is powered by the same 4.7-litre AJ37 V8 engine found in the V8 Vantage S, which produces 430 bhp (321 kW; 436 PS) and 490 N⋅m (361 lb⋅ft) of torque. The DB10 can accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 4.3 seconds and has a top speed of 310 km/h (193 mph).On 19 February 2016, one of the two "show cars" aside the eight cars used in the film was sold at an auction for £2.4 million.

Broccoli (disambiguation)

Broccoli is a vegetable.

Broccoli may also refer to:

Broccoli (company), a Japanese media company

Albert R. Broccoli (1909–1996), producer of the James Bond film series

Barbara Broccoli (born 1960), Albert R. Broccoli's daughter

Annie Brocoli (born 1971), name of a popular children's character in Québec

"Broccoli", a song by McFly from the album Room on the 3rd Floor

"Broccoli", a song by American rapper DRAM featuring Lil Yachty

a nickname used for Star Trek character Reginald Barclay

Broccoli, a client-side asset builder written in JavaScript and Node.js

Broccoli (magazine), a cannabis lifestyle magazine

Casino Royale (2006 film)

Casino Royale is a 2006 spy film, the twenty-first in the Eon Productions James Bond film series, and the third screen adaptation of Ian Fleming's 1953 novel of the same name. Directed by Martin Campbell and written by Neal Purvis & Robert Wade and Paul Haggis, it is the first film to star Daniel Craig as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond, and was produced by Eon Productions for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Columbia Pictures, making it the first Eon-produced Bond film to be co-produced by the latter studio. Following Die Another Day, Eon Productions decided to reboot the series, allowing them to show a less experienced and more vulnerable Bond.Casino Royale takes place at the beginning of Bond's career as Agent 007, as he is earning his licence to kill. The plot sees Bond on an assignment to bankrupt terrorist financier Le Chiffre in a high-stakes poker game; Bond falls in love with Vesper Lynd, a treasury employee assigned to provide the money he needs for the game. The film begins a story arc that continues in the 2008 film, Quantum of Solace.

Casting involved a widespread search for a new actor to succeed Pierce Brosnan as James Bond; the choice of Craig, announced in October 2005, drew controversy. Location filming took place in the Czech Republic, The Bahamas, Italy and the United Kingdom with interior sets built at Barrandov Studios and Pinewood Studios.

Casino Royale premiered at the Odeon Leicester Square on 14 November 2006. It received an overwhelmingly positive critical response, with reviewers highlighting Craig's reinvention of the character and the film's departure from the tropes of previous Bond films. It earned almost $600 million worldwide, becoming the highest-grossing James Bond film until the release of Skyfall in 2012.

Craig Warner

Craig Warner (born 25 April 1964) is a multiple award-winning playwright and screenwriter who lives and works in Suffolk, England. His play Strangers on a Train, based on the novel by Patricia Highsmith, ran in London's West End in 2013–14, and starred Jack Huston, Laurence Fox, Miranda Raison, Imogen Stubbs, Christian McKay, and MyAnna Buring. It was directed by Robert Allan Ackerman and produced by Barbara Broccoli. He wrote The Queen's Sister for Channel 4, which was nominated for several BAFTA awards (including Best Single Drama), Maxwell for BBC2, which garnered a Broadcasting Press Guild Award nomination for Best Single Drama and won David Suchet an International Emmy for Best Actor, and The Last Days of Lehman Brothers , for which Warner was longlisted for a BAFTA Craft Award for Best Writer, and which won him the award for Best Writer at the Seoul International Drama Awards in 2010. He wrote the mini-series Julius Caesar for Warner Bros., which gained Warner a Writers Guild Award nomination for Best Original Long-Form Drama, and he performed an extensive uncredited rewrite on The Mists of Avalon, also for Warner Bros., which was nominated for a Writers Guild Award and nine Emmys, including Best Mini-series. Warner wrote the screenplay for Codebreaker, a film about Alan Turing.

Craig Warner started out writing for the theatre and for radio. His first radio play for BBC Radio 4, Great Men of Music, was performed by Philip Davis and was included in Radio 4's first Young Playwrights Festival. His second play By Where the Old Shed Used to Be, with Miranda Richardson, won the Giles Cooper Award for Best Radio Plays of the Year, and it was included in the volume of winners for 1989, published by Methuen. His play Figure With Meat also won a Giles Cooper Award and was published in the Methuen volume of 1991. Craig Warner is the award's youngest ever winner, having received it for the first time when he was 24. He is also a composer and has written music and songs for a number of his works, including a full-length musical for BBC Radio 3 about the legend of Cassandra, called Agonies Awakening.

Warner received a BA in Philosophy from King's College London and an MA in Creative Writing from the University of East Anglia. He was born in Los Angeles.

David G. Wilson

David Gregg Wilson is a British screenwriter and assistant producer for the James Bond movie series and an executive producer of the James Bond video games.

Die Another Day

Die Another Day is a 2002 spy film, the twentieth film in the James Bond series produced by Eon Productions, as well as the fourth and final film to star Pierce Brosnan as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. The film follows Bond as he leads a mission to North Korea, during which he is betrayed and, after seemingly killing a rogue North Korean colonel, is captured and imprisoned. Fourteen months later, Bond is released as part of a prisoner exchange. Surmising that the mole is within the British government, he attempts to earn redemption by tracking down his betrayer and all those involved.

The film, produced by Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli, and directed by Lee Tamahori, marked the James Bond franchise's 40th anniversary. The series began in 1962 with Sean Connery starring as Bond in Dr. No. Die Another Day includes references to each of the preceding films.The film received mixed reviews. Some critics praised the work of Tamahori, while others criticised the film's heavy use of computer-generated imagery, which they found unconvincing and a distraction from the film's plot. Nevertheless, Die Another Day was the highest-grossing James Bond film up to that time if inflation is not taken into account.

Eon Productions

Eon Productions (an abbreviation of "Everything or Nothing") is a British film production company that produces the James Bond film series. The company is based in London's Piccadilly and also operates from Pinewood Studios in the United Kingdom.

Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool

Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool is a 2017 biographical romantic drama film directed by Paul McGuigan and starring Annette Bening and Jamie Bell, with a cast that includes Vanessa Redgrave and Julie Walters. It is based on the memoir of the same name by Peter Turner, which tells of his relationship with aging Academy Award-winning American actress Gloria Grahame in 1970s Liverpool and, some years later, her death from breast cancer.

The film premiered at the Telluride Film Festival on 1 September 2017. It was released in the United Kingdom on 16 November by Lionsgate and in the United States on 29 December by Sony Pictures Classics. At the 71st British Academy Film Awards, it received three nominations: Best Actress (Bening), Best Actor (Bell) and Best Adapted Screenplay.

GoldenEye

GoldenEye is a 1995 spy film, the seventeenth in the James Bond series produced by Eon Productions, and the first to star Pierce Brosnan as the fictional MI6 officer James Bond. It was directed by Martin Campbell and is the first in the series not to utilise any story elements from the works of novelist Ian Fleming. The story was conceived and written by Michael France, with later collaboration by other writers. In the film, Bond fights to prevent an ex-MI6 agent, gone rogue, from using a satellite against London to cause a global financial meltdown.

The film was released after a six-year hiatus in the series caused by legal disputes, during which Timothy Dalton resigned from the role of James Bond and was replaced by Pierce Brosnan. M was also recast, with actress Judi Dench becoming the first woman to portray the character, replacing Robert Brown. The role of Miss Moneypenny was also recast, with Caroline Bliss being replaced by Samantha Bond; Desmond Llewelyn was the only actor to reprise his role, as Q. It was the first Bond film made after the dissolution of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War, which provided a background for the plot.

The film accumulated a worldwide gross of US$350.7 million, considerably better than Dalton's films, without taking inflation into account. It received positive reviews, with critics viewing Brosnan as a definite improvement over his predecessor. It also received award nominations for "Best Achievement in Special Effects" and "Best Sound" from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts.The name "GoldenEye" pays homage to James Bond's creator, Ian Fleming. While working for British Naval Intelligence as a lieutenant commander, Fleming liaised with the Naval Intelligence Division to monitor developments in Spain after the Spanish Civil War in an operation codenamed Operation Goldeneye. Fleming used the name of this operation for his estate in Oracabessa, Jamaica.

Michael G. Wilson

Michael Gregg Wilson, OBE (born January 21, 1942) is an American-British producer and screenwriter, best known for his association with the James Bond film series.

Nicholas Connor

Nicholas Connor (also known as Nick Connor) is an English filmmaker. Best known for his work on the film Cotton Wool.

In 2017 he was awarded the 'Ones to Watch' Award by Into Film at the Odeon Leicester Square. Presented by actor Charles Dance and producer Barbara Broccoli, sponsored by EON Productions. Connor presently lives in Oldham, Manchester, England.

Production of the James Bond films

The James Bond film series is a British series of spy films based on the fictional character of MI6 agent James Bond, "007", who originally appeared in a series of books by Ian Fleming. It is one of the longest continually-running film series in history, having been in on-going production from 1962 to the present (with a six-year hiatus between 1989 and 1995). In that time Eon Productions has produced 24 films, most of them at Pinewood Studios. With a combined gross of over $7 billion to date, the films produced by Eon constitute the fourth-highest-grossing film series. Six actors have portrayed 007 in the Eon series, the latest being Daniel Craig.

Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman co-produced most of the Eon films until 1975, when Broccoli became the sole producer. The single exception during this period was Thunderball, on which Broccoli and Saltzman became executive producers while Kevin McClory produced. From 1984 Broccoli was joined by his stepson Michael G. Wilson as producer and in 1995 Broccoli stepped aside from Eon and was replaced by his daughter Barbara, who has co-produced with Wilson since. Broccoli's (and until 1975, Saltzman's) family company, Danjaq, has held ownership of the series through Eon, and maintained co-ownership with United Artists since the mid-1970s. The Eon series has seen continuity both in the main actors and in the production crews, with directors, writers, composers, production designers, and others employed through a number of films.

From the release of Dr. No (1962) to For Your Eyes Only (1981), the films were distributed solely by United Artists. When Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer absorbed United Artists in 1981, MGM/UA Entertainment Co. was formed and distributed the films until 1995. MGM solely distributed three films from 1997 to 2002 after United Artists was retired as a mainstream studio. From 2006 to 2015, MGM and Columbia Pictures co-distributed the film series, following the 2004 acquisition of MGM by a consortium led by Columbia's parent company, Sony Pictures. In November 2010, MGM filed for bankruptcy. Following its emergence from insolvency, Columbia became co-production partner of the series with Eon. Sony's distribution rights to the franchise expired in late 2015 with the release of Spectre. In 2017, MGM and Eon offered a one-film contract to co-finance and distribute the upcoming 25th film worldwide, which was reported on 25 May 2018 to have been won by Universal Pictures.Independently of the Eon series, there have been three additional productions with the character of James Bond: an American television adaptation, Casino Royale (1954), produced by CBS; a spoof, Casino Royale (1967), produced by Charles K. Feldman; and a remake of Thunderball entitled Never Say Never Again (1983), produced by Jack Schwartzman, who had obtained the rights to the film from McClory.

Quantum of Solace

Quantum of Solace is a 2008 spy film, the twenty-second in the James Bond series produced by Eon Productions, directed by Marc Forster and written by Paul Haggis, Neal Purvis and Robert Wade. It is the second film to star Daniel Craig as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. The film also stars Olga Kurylenko, Mathieu Amalric, Gemma Arterton, Jeffrey Wright, and Judi Dench. In the film, Bond seeks revenge for the death of his lover, Vesper Lynd, and is assisted by Camille Montes, who is plotting revenge for the murder of her own family. The trail eventually leads them to wealthy businessman Dominic Greene, a member of the Quantum organisation, who intends to stage a coup d'état in Bolivia to seize control of their water supply.

Producer Michael G. Wilson developed the film's plot while the previous film in the series, Casino Royale, was being shot. Purvis, Wade, and Haggis contributed to the script. Craig and Forster had to write some sections themselves due to the Writers' Strike, though they were not given the screenwriter credit in the final cut. The title was chosen from a 1959 short story in Ian Fleming's For Your Eyes Only, though the film does not contain any elements of that story. Location filming took place in Mexico, Panama, Chile, Italy, Austria and Wales, while interior sets were built and filmed at Pinewood Studios. Forster aimed to make a modern film that also featured classic cinema motifs: a vintage Douglas DC-3 was used for a flight sequence, and Dennis Gassner's set designs are reminiscent of Ken Adam's work on several early Bond films. Taking a course away from the usual Bond villains, Forster rejected any grotesque appearance for the character Dominic Greene to emphasise the hidden and secret nature of the film's contemporary villains.

The film was also marked by its frequent depictions of violence, with a 2012 study by the University of Otago in New Zealand finding it to be the most violent film in the franchise. Whereas Dr. No featured 109 "trivial or severely violent" acts, Quantum of Solace had a count of 250—the most depictions of violence in any Bond film—even more prominent since it was also the shortest film in the franchise. Quantum of Solace premiered at the Odeon Leicester Square on 29 October 2008, gathering mixed reviews, which mainly praised Craig's gritty performance and the film's action sequences, but felt that the film was less impressive than its predecessor Casino Royale. As of September 2016, it is the fourth-highest-grossing James Bond film, without adjusting for inflation, earning $586 million worldwide, and becoming the seventh highest-grossing film of 2008.

Skyfall

Skyfall is a 2012 spy film, the twenty-third in the James Bond series produced by Eon Productions. The film is the third to star Daniel Craig as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond and features Javier Bardem as Raoul Silva, the villain. It was directed by Sam Mendes and written by Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, and John Logan, and features the theme song "Skyfall", written and performed by Adele. It was distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) and Columbia Pictures.The story centres on Bond investigating an attack on MI6; the attack is part of a plot by former agent Raoul Silva to discredit and kill M as revenge for having betrayed him. The film sees the return of two recurring characters after an absence of two films: Q, played by Ben Whishaw, and Moneypenny, played by Naomie Harris.

Mendes was approached to direct after the release of Quantum of Solace in 2008. Development was suspended when MGM ran into financial trouble, and did not resume until December 2010. The original screenwriter, Peter Morgan, left the project during the suspension. When production resumed, Logan, Purvis, and Wade continued writing what became the final version. Filming began in November 2011, primarily in the United Kingdom, with smaller portions shot in China and Turkey.

Skyfall premiered in London at the Royal Albert Hall on 23 October 2012 and was then released in the United Kingdom on 26 October and the United States on 9 November. It was the first James Bond film to be screened in IMAX venues, although it was not filmed with IMAX cameras. The release coincided with the 50th anniversary of the series, which began with Dr. No in 1962. Skyfall was very well-received by critics, who praised its screenplay, acting (particularly by Craig, Bardem, and Dench), Mendes' direction, cinematography, musical score, and action sequences. It was the 14th film to gross over $1 billion worldwide, and the first James Bond film to do so. It became the seventh-highest-grossing film at the time, the highest-grossing film in the UK, the highest-grossing film in the series, the highest-grossing film worldwide for both Sony Pictures and MGM, and the second highest-grossing film of 2012. The film won several accolades, including two Academy Awards, two BAFTA Awards and two Grammy Awards.

Spectre (2015 film)

Spectre is a 2015 spy film, the twenty-fourth in the James Bond film series produced by Eon Productions for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Columbia Pictures. It is the fourth film to feature Daniel Craig as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond, and the second film in the series directed by Sam Mendes following Skyfall. It was written by John Logan, Neal Purvis, Robert Wade and Jez Butterworth. It is the final James Bond film to be internationally distributed by Columbia Pictures, as Universal Pictures will become the international distributor of its future films.

The story sees Bond pitted against the global criminal organisation Spectre and their leader Ernst Stavro Blofeld (Christoph Waltz). Bond attempts to thwart Blofeld's plan to launch a global surveillance network, and discovers Spectre and Blofeld were behind the events of the previous three films. The film marks Spectre and Blofeld's first appearance in an Eon Productions film since 1971's Diamonds Are Forever; a character resembling Blofeld had previously appeared in the 1981 film, For Your Eyes Only, but, because of the Thunderball controversy, he is not named, nor is his face shown. Several James Bond characters, including M, Q and Eve Moneypenny return, with new additions Léa Seydoux as Dr. Madeleine Swann, Dave Bautista as Mr. Hinx, Andrew Scott as Max Denbigh and Monica Bellucci as Lucia Sciarra.

Spectre was filmed from December 2014 to July 2015 in Austria, the United Kingdom, Italy, Morocco and Mexico. The action scenes prioritised practical effects and stunts, while employing computer-generated imagery made by five different companies. Spectre was estimated to have cost around $245 million—with some sources listing it as high as $300 million—making it the most expensive Bond film and one of the most expensive films ever made.

Spectre was released on 26 October 2015 in the United Kingdom—fifty years after the release of Thunderball, thirty after A View to a Kill, and twenty after GoldenEye—on the night of the world premiere at the London Royal Albert Hall. It was followed by a worldwide release, including IMAX screenings. It was released in the United States on 6 November. Spectre received mixed reviews from critics who praised the film's action sequences, cinematography, acting and musical score, but criticised the runtime, screenplay and pacing. The theme song "Writing's on the Wall", performed and co-written by Sam Smith, won an Academy Award and Golden Globe for Best Original Song. Spectre grossed over $880 million worldwide, making it the sixth-highest-grossing film of 2015, the second-largest unadjusted total for the series after Skyfall.

The Living Daylights

The Living Daylights is a 1987 British spy film, the fifteenth entry in the James Bond film series produced by Eon Productions, and the first to star Timothy Dalton as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. Directed by John Glen, the film's title is taken from Ian Fleming's short story The Living Daylights the plot of which also forms the basis of the first act of the film. It was the last film to use the title of an Ian Fleming story until the 2006 instalment Casino Royale.

The film was produced by Albert R. Broccoli, his stepson Michael G. Wilson, and his daughter, Barbara Broccoli. The Living Daylights was generally well received by most critics and was also a financial success, grossing $191.2 million worldwide.

The World Is Not Enough

The World Is Not Enough is a 1999 spy film, the nineteenth in the James Bond series produced by Eon Productions, and the third to star Pierce Brosnan as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. The film was directed by Michael Apted, with the original story and screenplay written by Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, and Bruce Feirstein. It was produced by Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli. The title is taken from a line in the 1963 novel On Her Majesty's Secret Service.

The film's plot revolves around the assassination of billionaire Sir Robert King by the terrorist Renard, and Bond's subsequent assignment to protect King's daughter Elektra, who had previously been held for ransom by Renard. During his assignment, Bond unravels a scheme to increase petroleum prices by triggering a nuclear meltdown in the waters of Istanbul.

Filming locations included Spain, France, Azerbaijan, Turkey, and the UK, with interiors shot at Pinewood Studios. Despite receiving mixed reviews, with the plot and Denise Richards' casting being frequently targeted for criticism, The World Is Not Enough earned $361,832,400 worldwide. It was also the first Eon-produced Bond film to be officially released under the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer label instead of United Artists, the original owner and distributor of the film franchise.

Tomorrow Never Dies

Tomorrow Never Dies is a 1997 spy film, the eighteenth entry in the James Bond series to be produced by Eon Productions, and the second to star Pierce Brosnan as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. Directed by Roger Spottiswoode, with the screenplay written by Bruce Feirstein, the film follows Bond as he attempts to stop Elliot Carver, a power-mad media mogul, from engineering world events to initiate World War III.

The film was produced by Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli, and was the first James Bond film made after the death of producer Albert R. Broccoli, to whom the movie pays tribute in the end credits. Filming locations included France, Thailand, Germany, Mexico and the United Kingdom. Tomorrow Never Dies performed well at the box office and earned a Golden Globe nomination despite mixed reviews. While its performance at the domestic box office surpassed that of its predecessor, GoldenEye, it was the only Pierce Brosnan Bond film not to open at number one at the box office, as it opened the same day as Titanic, but instead at number two.

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