Bantam Spectra

Bantam Spectra is the science fiction division of American publishing company Bantam Books, which is owned by Random House.

According to their website, Spectra publishes "science fiction, fantasy, horror, and speculative novels from recognizable authors".[1] Spectra authors have collectively won 31 such awards in the fields of science fiction and fantasy, and been nominated on 132 occasions.[2] These authors include:[3]

Bantam Spectra
Parent companyBantam Books/Random House
Country of originUnited States
Headquarters locationNew York City, New York
Publication typesBooks
Fiction genresScience fiction, Fantasy
Official websitewww.unboundworlds.com

References

  1. ^ Random House
  2. ^ Worldswithoutend.com
  3. ^ Worldswithoutend.com

External links

Alternate Americas

Alternate Americas is an anthology of alternate history science fiction short stories edited by Gregory Benford and Martin H. Greenberg as the fourth volume in their What Might Have Been series. It was first published in paperback by Bantam Spectra in October 1992. It was later gathered together with Alternate Wars into the omnibus anthology What Might Have Been: Volumes 3 & 4: Alternate Wars / Alternate Americas (Bantam Spectra/SFBC, December 1992).The book collects fourteen novellas, novelettes and short stories by various science fiction authors, with an introduction by Benford.

Alternate Heroes

Alternate Heroes is an anthology of alternate history science fiction short stories edited by Gregory Benford and Martin H. Greenberg as the second volume in their What Might Have Been series. It was first published in paperback by Bantam Spectra in January 1990, and in trade paperback by BP Books in June 2004. It was also gathered together with Alternate Empires into the omnibus anthology What Might Have Been: Volumes 1 & 2: Alternate Empires / Alternate Heroes (Bantam Spectra/SFBC, July 1990).The book collects fourteen novellas, novelettes and short stories by various science fiction authors, with an introduction by Benford.

Alternate Wars

Alternate Wars is an anthology of alternate history science fiction short stories edited by Gregory Benford and Martin H. Greenberg as the third volume in their What Might Have Been series. It was first published in paperback by Bantam Spectra in December 1991. It was later gathered together with Alternate Americas into the omnibus anthology What Might Have Been: Volumes 3 & 4: Alternate Wars / Alternate Americas (Bantam Spectra/SFBC, December 1992).The book collects twelve novellas, novelettes and short stories by various science fiction authors, with an introduction by Benford.

Assemblers of Infinity

Assemblers of Infinity is a science-fiction novel by Kevin J. Anderson and Doug Beason. It first appeared in print in serialized form in the American magazine Analog Science Fiction and Fact from September to December 1992 and was published in 1993 by Bantam Spectra. In 1994 it was nominated for the Nebula Award for best science fiction novel: this was the only Nebula nomination that both Anderson and Beason ever had. It was also placed 25th SF Novel in the 1994 Locus Award. The book is currently out of print, but is still available as e-book.

Hammered (Bear novel)

Hammered is a science fiction novel by Elizabeth Bear first published on 28 December 2004 by Bantam Spectra. The book won the 2006 Locus Award for Best First Novel. It is the first book of a trilogy made of Hammered, Scardown, and Worldwired.

Hugo Award for Best Novel

The Hugo Award for Best Novel is one of the Hugo Awards given each year for science fiction or fantasy stories published or translated into English during the previous calendar year. The novel award is available for works of fiction of 40,000 words or more; awards are also given out in the short story, novelette, and novella categories. The Hugo Awards have been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing".The Hugo Award for Best Novel has been awarded annually by the World Science Fiction Society since 1953, except in 1954 and 1957. In addition to the regular Hugo awards, beginning in 1996 Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded for 50, 75, or 100 years prior. Retro Hugos may only be awarded for years in which a World Science Fiction Convention, or Worldcon, was hosted, but no awards were originally given. To date, Retro Hugo awards have been given for novels for 1939, 1941, 1943, 1946, 1951, and 1954.Hugo Award nominees and winners are chosen by supporting or attending members of the annual Worldcon, and the presentation evening constitutes its central event. The selection process is defined in the World Science Fiction Society Constitution as instant-runoff voting with six nominees, except in the case of a tie. The novels on the ballot are the six most-nominated by members that year, with no limit on the number of stories that can be nominated. The 1953, 1955, and 1958 awards did not include any recognition of runner-up novels, but since 1959 all final candidates have been recorded. Initial nominations are made by members in January through March, while voting on the ballot of six nominations is performed roughly in April through July, subject to change depending on when that year's Worldcon is held. Prior to 2017, the final ballot was five works; it was changed that year to six, with each initial nominator limited to five nominations. Worldcons are generally held in August or early September, and are held in a different city around the world each year.During the 70 nomination years, 145 authors have had works nominated; 48 of these have won, including co-authors, ties, and Retro Hugos. One translator has been noted along with the author whose works he translated. Robert A. Heinlein has received the most Hugos for Best Novel as well as the most nominations, with six wins (including two Retro Hugos) and twelve nominations. Lois McMaster Bujold has received four Hugos on ten nominations; the only other authors to win more than twice are Isaac Asimov (including one Retro Hugo), N. K. Jemisin, Connie Willis, and Vernor Vinge, who have each won three times. Nine other authors have won the award twice. The next-most nominations by a winning author are held by Robert J. Sawyer and Larry Niven, who have been nominated nine and eight times, respectively, and each have only won once, while Robert Silverberg has the greatest number of nominations without winning at nine. Three authors have won the award in consecutive years: Orson Scott Card (1986, 1987), Lois McMaster Bujold (1991, 1992), and N. K. Jemisin (2016, 2017, and 2018).

List of Gaylactic Spectrum Award winners and nominees for best novel

The Gaylactic Spectrum Awards are given to works of science fiction, fantasy and horror that explore LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender) topics in a positive way. They were founded in 1998, first presented by the Gaylactic Network in 1999, and in 2002 they were given their own organization, the Gaylactic Spectrum Awards Foundation.

Since their inception, awards have been given in categories for novels, short fiction and best other work. Other categories have also been added and removed in intervening years, and works produced before the inception of the awards are eligible to be inducted into the "Hall of Fame". The novels category is open to submissions of novels released during the prior calendar year in North America that includes "significant positive GLBT content". The results are decided by a panel of judges from the list of submitted nominees; the long list of nominees is reduced to a short list of finalists, and the results are generally announced and presented at Gaylaxicon, an annual convention devoted to LGBT-themed science fiction. This article lists all the "Best Novel" award nominees and winners and novels inducted into the Hall of Fame.Each award consists of an etched image on lucite on a stand, using a spiral galaxy in a triangle logo, based on the logo the Gaylactic Network. The award winner's name, work title, award year and award category are etched on a small plaque on the base or on the plexiglass itself. A small cash stipend is awarded to winners in the Best Novel category. The cost of the awards is met through individual donations and fundraising events.The only author to have won the best novel award more than once is Laurie J. Marks (with two wins); Elizabeth Bear holds the record for most nominations. Seven of her novels have been nominated (one of them winning). Tanya Huff and Lynn Flewelling have both been a finalists five times without winning.

Lou Aronica

Lou Aronica (born 1958) is an American editor and publisher, primarily of science fiction. He co-edited the Full Spectrum anthologies with Shawna McCarthy. As a publisher he began at Bantam Books and formed their Bantam Spectra science fiction and fantasy label. Later he moved on to Avon and helped create their Avon-Eos science fiction and fantasy label.

Lynn Flewelling

Lynn Flewelling (born Lynn Elizabeth Beaulieu on October 20, 1958) is an American fantasy fiction author.

M. K. Hobson

M. K. Hobson (born January 21, 1969) is an American speculative fiction and fantasy writer. In 2003 she was a Pushcart Prize nominee, and her debut novel The Native Star was nominated for the 2010 Nebula Award. She lives in Oregon City, Oregon.

Hobson's short fiction has appeared in magazines such as Sci Fiction, the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Realms of Fantasy, Strange Horizons, and ChiZine. Her work has also appeared in anthologies such as Polyphony 5 and Polyphony 6 and Medicine Show. Hobson's story "The Hand of the Devil on a String" appeared on the 2008 Best American Fantasy recommended reading list, and her other work has received Honorable Mentions in "Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror" and "Year’s Best Science Fiction."

She is the author of the Veneficas Americana historical fantasy series. The first novel in the series, The Native Star, was published by Bantam Spectra on August 31, 2010. The sequel, The Hidden Goddess, followed on April 26, 2011. The third novel, The Warlock's Curse, begins a new duology and follows characters from a new generation. Hobson has described the style of the first two novels as "Bustlepunk.".She is also a co-host of the fantasy podcast PodCastle, a sister podcast of Escape Pod. In the past, she was co-editor—with author Douglas Lain—of the surrealist/anarchist 'zine Diet Soap.

Nebula Award for Best Novel

The Nebula Award for Best Novel is given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) for science fiction or fantasy novels. A work of fiction is defined by the organization as a novel if it is 40,000 words or longer; awards are also given out for pieces of shorter lengths in the categories of short story, novelette, and novella. To be eligible for Nebula Award consideration a novel must be published in English in the United States. Works published in English elsewhere in the world are also eligible provided they are released on either a website or in an electronic edition. The Nebula Award for Best Novel has been awarded annually since 1966. Novels which were expanded forms of previously published short stories are eligible, as are novellas published by themselves if the author requests them to be considered as a novel. The award has been described as one of "the most important of the American science fiction awards" and "the science-fiction and fantasy equivalent" of the Emmy Awards.Nebula Award nominees and winners are chosen by members of the SFWA, though the authors of the nominees do not need to be members. Works are nominated each year between November 15 and February 15 by published authors who are members of the organization, and the six works that receive the most nominations then form the final ballot, with additional nominees possible in the case of ties. Members may then vote on the ballot throughout March, and the final results are presented at the Nebula Awards ceremony in May. Authors are not permitted to nominate their own works, and ties in the final vote are broken, if possible, by the number of nominations the works received. Beginning with the 2009 awards, the rules were changed to the current format. Prior to then, the eligibility period for nominations was defined as one year after the publication date of the work, which allowed the possibility for works to be nominated in the calendar year after their publication and then be awarded in the calendar year after that. Works were added to a preliminary list for the year if they had ten or more nominations, which were then voted on to create a final ballot, to which the SFWA organizing panel was also allowed to add an additional work.During the 53 nomination years, 183 authors have had works nominated; 40 of these have won, including co-authors and ties. Ursula K. Le Guin has received the most Nebula Awards for Best Novel with four wins out of six nominations. Joe Haldeman has received three awards out of four nominations, while nine other authors have won twice. Jack McDevitt has the most nominations at twelve, with one win, while Poul Anderson and Philip K. Dick have the most nominations without winning an award at five.

Paula Volsky

Paula Volsky is an American fantasy author.

The Crystal Star

The Crystal Star is a bestselling 1994 Star Wars novel written by Vonda McIntyre and published by Bantam Spectra. The novel is set ten years after the Battle of Endor in the Star Wars expanded universe.

The New Rebellion

The New Rebellion is a 1996 bestselling fictional Star Wars novel written by Kristine Kathryn Rusch and published by Bantam Spectra. The novel is set thirteen years after the Battle of Endor in the Star Wars expanded universe.

The Privilege of the Sword

The Privilege of the Sword is a fantasy novel by American author Ellen Kushner. First published in 2006 by Bantam Spectra, the novel won the 2007 Locus Award and was nominated for both the Nebula Award for Best Novel and the Gaylactic Spectrum Award in 2007. Although part of a series, the book also serves as a stand-alone.

Universe 1 (Silverberg anthology)

Universe 1 is an anthology of original science fiction short stories edited by American writers Robert Silverberg and Karen Haber, the first volume in a series of three, continuing an earlier series of the same name edited by Terry Carr. It was first published in hardcover and trade paperback by Doubleday Foundation in June 1990. A standard paperback edition was issued by Bantam Spectra in April 1991.The book collects twenty novelettes and short stories by various science fiction authors, together with an introduction by Silverberg.

Universe 2 (Silverberg anthology)

Universe 2 is an anthology of original science fiction short stories edited by Robert Silverberg and Karen Haber, the second volume in a series of three, continuing an earlier series of the same name edited by Terry Carr. It was first published in hardcover Bantam Books and trade paperback by Bantam Spectra in March 1992.The book collects twenty-two novelettes and short stories by various science fiction authors, together with an introduction by Silverberg.

Women of the Otherworld

Women of the Otherworld is the name of a fantasy series by Canadian author Kelley Armstrong.

The books feature werewolves, witches, necromancers, sorcerers, and vampires struggling to fit as "normal" in today's world. The series also includes novellas and short stories, published online (and one in an anthology).

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