Ball badminton

Ball badminton is a sport native to India. It is a racket game, played with a yellow ball made of wool, on a court of fixed dimensions (12 by 24 metres) divided by a net. The game was played as early as 1856 by the royal family in Tanjore, the capital of Thanjavur district in Tamil Nadu, India. It enjoys the greatest popularity in India. Ball badminton is a fast-paced game; it demands skill, quick reflexes, good judgment, agility, and the ability to control the ball with one's wrist.[1]

Games are usually played outdoors during the day. As a result, weather conditions wield a considerable influence, and ball badminton's rules allow the effects of weather conditions to be distributed more-or-less evenly between both teams. More recently, indoor versions of the game have been played under artificial lighting. All-India tournaments are conducted regularly using floodlights in Tamil Nadu, Puducherry, Andhra Pradesh, Telangana and Karnataka. Ball Badminton sport is managed by " Ball Badminton Federation of India" Now Ball badminton game is officially recognised game in India. Total 34 units are affiliated to "Ball badminton federation of India " in which 26 are States units including Bihar, jharkhand, Nagaland etc 5 Public sector units and 3 provisional affiliated units.

Ball Badminton, 2012

History

Ball badminton originated in Tanjore, in Tamil Nadu. It became popular, commanding the interest of the Maharaja of Tanjore. The game has attracted many players from southern India.

Previously, ball badminton was an attractive game for rural boys since it required a minimum of equipment. The game drew a large number of students from South India, resulting in the formation of the Ball Badminton Federation of India in 1954. The BBF was among the first three sports federations—along with the Indian Athletic Federation and the Indian Hockey Federation—to form the Indian Olympic Association in 1961. Ball badminton eventually spread to Andhra Pradesh, and the first national championship was conducted at Hyderabad in 1956. It was later introduced at the junior and sub-junior levels.[2]

Types of incumbent The ball is yellow wool, from 27 to 30 grams in weight and from 5 to 5.5 cm in diameter. A standard ball-badminton racket usually weighs from 165 to 185 grams and is 63 to 70 cm in length. The strung oval area of the racket should be 20 to 22 across and 24 to 27 cm in length. The net is made of fine cord to make a 2 cm square mesh along its length and is edged with red tape at the top. The entire net is red, white and blue, 100 cm wide and 13.5 metres in length. It is tied to a centre pole of 183 cm and two poles of 185 cm at the sides of the court to maintain the 183 cm height of the net at the centre. Two posts, each 180 cm high, are fixed one metre outside the court on either side at the end of the line to which the net is tied, strong enough to keep the net well stretched. A hook is fixed at 1.5 metres height to each pole to easily tighten the net whenever necessary. The size of the court for "fives" teams is 12 metres wide and 24 metres long. It is divided across the middle by a net line over which the net is hung, the ends of which are attached to the tops of the two posts. The serving crease lines are drawn one metre away from each side of the net line and parallel to it. The centre line is drawn halfway between the serving crease lines and parallel to the sidelines; this divides the space on each side of the crease line into two halves, known as the right and left courts. The boundary lines are marked with white tape, 10 mm thick. The centre and crease lines are to be marked so as to be visible, about 10 mm wide[3]

Rules

Ball badminton is a team sport. The ball is served (hit from the right or left court of one side to the diagonally opposite court of the other side). The server begins on the right court and moves to the left court each time a point is scored. The ball may be returned by any opposing player. After the first 9th, 18th, and 27nd point the teams change positions, with the server continuing to alternate between the right and left courts. The ball is served underhand below the waist, then it must go over the net and beyond the serving crease line on the other side. An overhand service—if the ball is above the server's waist when it is struck—is a fault. The ball must be returned before it touches the ground, and no player may strike the ball twice in succession. The server must not serve until the other side is ready; ordinarily, the players of the receiving side are expected to be ready. During the game the player must not leave the court except in the act of playing, if he has an accident, or with the referee's permission for activities such as changing a racket, tying a shoelace, or tightening a belt. The referee normally grants a player's request for such activities, unless the ball is in play; however, he has the final right to refuse if he deems such activities delaying tactics. In "fives" tournaments, a team consists of ten formally designated players, any five of whom play while the other five remain on the sidelines with the team manager, ready to play. Doubles tournaments use teams of three players. During a match of two or three games, three player substitutions are allowed. Substitutions may be made at any time during the game. The ball may not be changed during a three-game match set, unless it is damaged.

Faults

If a fault is made by the serving team, the serving player shall be replaced by a teammate. If all five players on a team commit a serving fault, the serve goes to the receiving team. If a fault is made by the receiving team, the serving team is awarded a point and continues to serve. It is a fault if:

  • The server is not stationary (both feet on the ground) while serving
  • The server misses his stroke
  • The ball is served overhand (hits the racket above the server's waist)
  • Service is delivered from the wrong court (right instead of left, or vice versa)
  • The ball touches the ground before it is returned
  • The ball served drops into the wrong court or on a line (center, serving crease, side or boundary)
  • A player serves out of turn (before the previous server is out)
  • Any part of the server’s body or racket crosses any of the lines when serving (even a foot on line is out of court)
  • A "double touch" is made (a player, while making a stroke, hits the ball more than once)
  • A "tip" is made (the ball is touched by two rackets of the same team in succession)
  • A "clash" is made (the rackets of two or more players clash in playing the ball before, during, or after striking the ball)
  • A player—or his racket—crosses the net line during the course of play (i.e. during a rally)
  • The ball is sent out of bounds (a player is free to hit a ball going out of bounds back in, but if he misses it he commits a fault)
  • The ball touches a player or his uniform, whether inside or outside the court
  • A player's racket, in the act of striking, crosses or touches the net
  • The ball fails to clear the net either in service or return
  • The ball touches the top of the net
  • The served ball falls on any line (a ball in rally, however, is faulted only if it fails on the boundary line; it can fall on the center or crease lines)
  • The ball is bounced on the ground after the server is warned by the umpire to play
  • Delay in serving is caused by passing the ball from one player to another after the umpire has requested play to begin

Match play

A match consists of three games. The team that wins two out of three games is the match winner. The team first scoring the 34th point wins a game. Teams start each game from the side opposite the one they played the previous game. There is a break of two minutes between the end of the first game and the start of the second game, and five minutes between the second and the third games. Choice of side and the right of first service is decided by a coin toss at the beginning of a match. If the team winning the toss chooses to serve, the other team has the choice of side and vice versa. At the beginning of a match the referee allows two trials, one from each side. After the trials are over, the umpire shall call "play" and regular play begins. A ball is in play from the time a player attempts to serve until it touches the ground or until a "fault" or "let" (a re-serve) is called by the umpire.

The officiating team consists of one umpire, two or more line referees and a scorer. When the umpire calls "play", if a team refuses to play it forfeits the match. The umpire is the sole judge on the fairness of a play, weather and lighting conditions. His decisions are final. It is the umpire's responsibility to call "fault" or "let", with (or without) an appeal from the players. If an umpire erroneously calls "fault" and immediately corrects himself and calls "play" but the striker fails to return the ball, a "let" is allowed. Umpires serve for an entire match, unless a change is authorized by the tournament committee. Each of the two (or more) line referees is responsible for one boundary line and one half of the side line opposite the umpire, in addition to any other duties assigned by the umpire. Referees signal the umpire in a code prescribed by the BFF. The scorer records the points scored and the number of hands on the score sheet. A ball may be replaced by an umpire if it is lost or damaged. The umpire can overrule a line referee's decision, if he feels that an error has been committed.

The umpire is also responsible for the net. He announces the score (for the benefit of the scorer) when a point is scored or a server is out. In announcing the score he calls the number of the serving hand, followed by the score of the serving team and the score of the other team. If a match is suspended by the umpire for any reason (e.g. weather and light), it is resumed from the point at which it was stopped. In case of a tie between two or more teams in any tournament, a match is not replayed. If the tie is unbroken, teams are ranked based on game and point scores. In a league tournament, if two (or more) teams have identical won/lost records their game scores are used to break the tie.

Game Scoring

The number of games won and lost by each team in each league match is recorded. Keeping in mind that each match is played as a best of three games, a team winning a match after three games has won two games and lost one. If a team wins a match in two straight games, its official won/lost record is 3–0. The losing team in each case has a record of 1–2 and 0–3, respectively. The difference between the number of games won and lost is a team's game score. The team with the highest game score is the winner in the event of a tie; if two or more teams have the same game score, their point scores will also break the tie.

Point Score

Points scored in each game by each team in all league matches are recorded. A team winning a match in two straight games, after recording the points scored for and against in the two games played also receives 35 points in favour and zero points against for the third (unplayed) game. Correspondingly, zero points in favour and 35 points against are recorded for the losing team. The difference between total points in favour and against in all the matches is a team's point score. The team scoring the most net points (for minus against) is the winner.

Discipline

The umpire can warn a player if the player behaves on-court in a manner bringing discredit to the referee, other players or the officials, or otherwise lowering the image of the game. A second warning triggers a yellow card. A third warning triggers a red card and ejection from the game; following a red card, the player's team continues with four players. A team manager substitute for a player shown a yellow card, if a sufficient number of substitutions remain.

Umpire duties

  • Since the umpire is the most important official, he should be well-versed in the rules of ball badminton
  • Before the play begins, he makes necessary entries on the score sheet and hands it to the scorer for use and obtaining signatures of each team captain when the match ends
  • Check net height and other ground arrangements
  • Instructs line referees and scorer
  • Instructs both the terms on discipline, major rules and recent rule changes
  • Carefully consider his decisions, since his judgments are final; a player may only appeal based on a rule
  • A line referee’s decision is final in all judgment calls on his own line; the umpire does not ordinarily overrule him. If a line referee's vision is blocked, the umpire may make the call if he can; otherwise a ‘let’ should be given
  • If a decision is impossible, the umpire gives a ‘let’. He should not consult the players or spectators
  • The umpire is responsible for all lines not covered by line referees
  • When the umpire is uncertain whether there has been an infringement of a rule, ‘fault’ should not be called. A ‘let’ should be given
  • The umpire should remember the game is for players, and keeps play in progress without unnecessary interruption
  • In summation, the umpire should control the game firmly

See also

References

  1. ^ http://ballbadmintonfederationofindia.com/about_game.html
  2. ^ "Game history" on Ball Badminton Federation of India website
  3. ^ "Rules and regulations" on Ball Badminton Federation website

External links

Arjuna Award

The Arjuna Awards are given by the Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports, Government of India to recognize outstanding achievement in sports. Started in 1961, the award carries a cash prize of ₹ 5,00,000, a bronze statue of Arjuna and a scroll.Over the years the scope of the award has been expanded and a large number of sports persons who belonged to the pre-Arjuna Award era were also included in the list. Further, the number of disciplines for which the award is given was increased to include indigenous games and the physically handicapped category.

The Government revises the criteria for the Arjuna Award over the years. As per the revised guidelines, to be eligible for the Award, a sportsperson should not only have had good performance consistently for the previous four years at the international level with excellence for the year for which the Award is recommended, but should also have shown qualities of leadership, sportsmanship and a sense of discipline the total amount awarded is 35,00,00,000.

Badminton

Badminton is a racquet sport played using racquets to hit a shuttlecock across a net. Although it may be played with larger teams, the most common forms of the game are "singles" (with one player per side) and "doubles" (with two players per side). Badminton is often played as a casual outdoor activity in a yard or on a beach; formal games are played on a rectangular indoor court. Points are scored by striking the shuttlecock with the racquet and landing it within the opposing side's half of the court.

Each side may only strike the shuttlecock once before it passes over the net. Play ends once the shuttlecock has struck the floor or if a fault has been called by the umpire, service judge, or (in their absence) the opposing side.The shuttlecock is a feathered or (in informal matches) plastic projectile which flies differently from the balls used in many other sports. In particular, the feathers create much higher drag, causing the shuttlecock to decelerate more rapidly. Shuttlecocks also have a high top speed compared to the balls in other racquet sports. The flight of the shuttlecock gives the sport its distinctive nature.

The game developed in British India from the earlier game of battledore and shuttlecock. European play came to be dominated by Denmark but the game has become very popular in Asia, with recent competitions dominated by China. Since 1992, badminton has been a Summer Olympic sport with four events: men's singles, women's singles, men's doubles, and women's doubles, with mixed doubles added four years later. At high levels of play, the sport demands excellent fitness: players require aerobic stamina, agility, strength, speed, and precision. It is also a technical sport, requiring good motor coordination and the development of sophisticated racquet movements.

Ball game

Ball games (or ballgames), also ball sports, are any form of game or sport which feature a ball as part of play. These include games such as football, cricket, baseball, basketball, and American football. Such games have diverse rules and histories and are of mostly unrelated origins. Ball games can be defined in several broad types:

Bat-and-ball games, such as cricket and baseball.

Racquet and ball games, such as tennis, squash and ball badminton.

Hand and ball-striking games, such as various handball codes, rebound handball and four square.

Goal sports, usually team sports such as basketball and all forms of football, lacrosse, and hockey (except ice hockey which is a goal sport but is played with a hockey puck).

Non-racquet net sports, such as volleyball and sepak takraw.

Target sports or precision sports, such as bowling, lawn bowls, croquet, and golf, as well as cue sports, including snooker, pool, and other forms of billiards (the sport of curling, which uses a stone rather than a ball, is classified with target or precision sports for some purposes).

Cambrian Hall

Cambrian Hall is a private schools located in the district of Dehradun, now the capital of Uttarakhand state in India. Cambrian Hall is a residential-cum day, co-educational English Medium School. It is certified by the Council for the Indian School Certificate Examinations (ISCE), New Delhi.

Cambrian Hall is located close to the Indian Military Academy and Forest Research Institute of India. Founded in 1954 by Col. Shashi Shumshere Jung Bahadur Rana, the school is now run by a board, which comprises members of the founding family, educators, and prominent citizens.

Today, the School has 1500 boys and girls studying in Cambrian School and has attached hostels, hospital, sports arena's and grounds.

The school has two academic blocks, Jodha Block and Doutre Block. Jodha block houses 8th to 12th grades and has fully equipped modern laboratories for Computer Sciences, Chemistry, Biology and Home Sciences. The Doutre Block houses 3rd to 7th grades, an Art room, Junior Library and a computer sciences lab. There is a separate block for 1st and 2nd grade.

There is also an Experimental block has Open Air Theatre, Dance room and music rooms and the Senior Library. The school has a large auditorium that can accommodate almost 1000 students.

The hostel for boarders is called the Shashi Block. The hostel have modern dining halls and a hygienic kitchen. Students are provided accommodation in dormitories according to their age and House Colours. The Principal, Vice-Principal, Bursar, Estate Supervisor, Kitchen in-charges and house masters live in the same campus but in separate quarters.

Sports play an integral role in the manifestation of a child's character. School arranges for a wide range of games for students like Hockey, Football, Cricket, Basket Ball, Volley Ball, Badminton, Cross Country, Athletics, P.T., Gymnastics and Table Tennis.

Delhi Public School, Bathinda

Delhi Public School, Bathinda (or DPS) was established in 2003 at Goniana Road, Bathinda in the state of Punjab in India. It is a day residential senior secondary school on a campus of 14 acres (57,000 m2) with facilities for swimming, football, basketball, hockey and also cricket. It is affiliated to Central Board of Secondary Education New Delhi. The school had 1429 students and 90 staff as of September 2009. It also has two single-sex hostels.

The founder principal was Dr. T C Williams. The present principal is Dr. Arun Jee.

Guru Tegh Bahadur Khalsa Senior Secondary School, Malout

Guru Tegh Bahadur Khalsa Senior Secondary School (Punjabi: ਗੁਰੂ ਤੇਗ਼ ਬਹਾਦੁਰ ਖ਼ਾਲਸਾ ਸੀਨੀਅਰ ਸੈਕੰਡਰੀ ਸਕੂਲ gurū tēg. bahādur kh.ālasā sīnīar saika°ḍarī sakūl) is in the city of Malout in the Punjab state of India.

It was established on 23 July 1973 to provide education to the children of the town and neighboring areas. The school is affiliated to the Punjab School Education Board, Mohali.The school is named after Guru Tegh Bahadur ji, the 9th Guru of Sikhism.

Karu Jain

Karuna Vijaykumar Jain (born 9 September 1985 in Bangalore, India) is a Test and One Day International cricketer who represents India. She is a right hand batter and wicket-keeper. She has scored a century and eight fifties in ODIs.

Kī-o-rahi

Kī-o-rahi is a ball sport played in New Zealand with a small round ball called a 'kī'. It is a fast-paced game incorporating skills similar to rugby union, netball and touch. Two teams of seven players play on a circular field divided into zones, and score points by touching the 'pou' (boundary markers) and hitting a central 'tupu' or target. The game is played with varying rules (e.g. number of people, size of field, tag ripping rules etc.) depending on the geographic area it is played in. A process called Tatu, before the game, determines which rules the two teams will use.

In 2005 kī-o-rahi was chosen to represent New Zealand by global fast-food chain McDonald's as part of its 'Passport to Play' programme to teach physical play activities in 31,000 American schools.

The programme will give instruction in 15 ethnic games to seven million primary school children.The New Zealand kī-o-rahi representative organisation, Kī-o-Rahi Akotanga Iho, formed with men's and women's national teams, completed a 14 match tour of Europe in September and October 2010. The men's team included 22-test All Black veteran Wayne Shelford who led the team to a 57–10 test win against Kī-o-Rahi Dieppe Organisation, the French Kī-o-Rahi federation.

Shelford's kī-o-rahi test jersey made him the first kī-o-rahi/rugby double international for NZ. The women's team coached by Andrea Cameron (Head of PE at Tikipunga High School) also won by 33–0. These were the first historic test matches between NZ and France.

List of Tamil recipients of the Arjuna Award

The Arjuna Award was instituted in 1961 by the Government of India to recognize outstanding achievement in National sports.

This may NOT be a complete list, please add/modify.

List of ball games

This is a list of ball games which are popular games or sports involving some type of ball or similar object. Ball sports are not sports in the true sense, but are instead considered to be games. These ball games can be grouped by the general objective of the game, sometimes indicating a common origin either of a game itself or of its basic idea:

Bat-and-ball games, such as cricket and baseball.

Racquet and ball games, such as tennis, squash, racquetball and ball badminton.

Hand and ball-striking games, such as various handball codes, rebound handball and 4 square.

Goal games, such as forms of hockey (except ice hockey which uses a hockey puck), basketball and all forms of football or lacrosse.

Net games, such as volleyball and sepak.

List of racket sports

Racket sports are games in which players use rackets to hit a ball or other object.

Badminton

Ball badminton

Basque pelota

Frontenis

Xare

Beach tennis

360Ball

Matkot

Miniten

Padel

Paleta Frontón

Pelota mixteca

Pickleball

Platform tennis

Qianball

Racketlon

Racquetball

Racquets

Real tennis

Soft tennis

Speed-ball

Crossminton (previously "Speedminton")

Squash

Hardball squash

Squash tennis

Stické

Table tennis

Tennis

Eclipse Ball

Tennis polo

List of sports

The following is a list of sports/games, divided by category.

According to the World Sports Encyclopedia (2003), there are 8,000 indigenous sports and sporting games.

Maharaja's College Stadium

Maharaja's College Stadium is a multi-use stadium in Kochi, India. It is the home ground of the Maharajas College. The stadium has a capacity of 15,000. It hosted some of the 1960 AFC Asian Cup qualifying matches as well as the 2009 National Schools Athletics Championship.

The facilities available for sports activities include a 400-meter synthetic track, a football field-cum-cricket ground, a stadium pavilion and courts for games like hockey, volleyball, basketball, kho-kho, kabady, and ball badminton. Facilities are available for indoor games like table-tennis, carom, chess, wrestling, weightlifting and power lifting.

Maharaja Engineering College

Maharaja Engineering College is situated at Palankarai village in Avinashi taluk on the NH 47. Avinashi is a town 43 kilometers from Coimbatore, India. It is an education institution run by Paramasivam Palaniswamy trust.

R. Gundu Rao

Rajesh Gundu Rao (8 April 1937–22 August 1993) was the Chief Minister of Karnataka state from 1980 to 1983.

Rao was born in Kushalanagara in the erstwhile Coorg Province (now in Kodagu district of Karnataka) of British India on 8 April 1937. His parents were K. Rama Rao and Chinnamma. His father was a Headmaster in a local school. He studied in Ammathi High school. He was a well-known Ball Badminton Player in Kodagu and had won numerous trophies.Rao began his political career as Town Municipality President of Kushalanagar, a position in which he served for ten years. Later, he was elected as MLA from Somwarpet in 1972 and 1978. He served as minister in the government of D. Devaraj Urs and also as a Leader of Opposition for a brief period.

He became Chief minister of Karnataka after the collapse of the Urs government. As Chief Minister, Gundu Rao was responsible for the construction of the Majestic bus station in Bangalore, which is today known as Kempegowda Bus Station. He also sanctioned numerous Medical and Engineering Colleges in Karnataka. The Cauvery IInd Stage was completed within a year and half during his tenure. He was also responsible for the construction of the "Kala Mandira" in Mysore.The Gokak agitation seeking supremacy for Kannada in the administration and education of Karnataka as well as the police firing on farmers at Nargund and Navalgund were the low points during his tenure as Chief minister. While he was acknowledged as an efficient administrator, he was more well known for his flamboyance, boldness and outspokenness.Gundu Rao was also elected as a Member of Parliament from Bangalore South Constituency from 1989 to 1991. He died of leukemia in London on 22 August 1993, aged 57. His son Dinesh Gundu Rao is currently serving as a legislator from Gandhinagar constituency in Bangalore and minister for food and civil supplies.

Sanskar International School

Sanskar is a day boarding, co-educational and English speaking educational institution in India. The school takes children from 3 years plus to 18 years i.e. Nursery to 10+2 CBSE and International Syllabus.

Sport in Pakistan

Sport in Pakistan is a significant part of Pakistan culture. Cricket is the most popular sport in Pakistan, while field hockey, polo, and squash are also popular. Traditional sports like kabaddi and other well-known games are also played. The Pakistan Sports Board was created in 1962 by the Ministry of Education as a corporate body for the purposes of promoting and developing uniform standards of competition in sports in Pakistan comparable to the standards prevailing internationally, and regulating and controlling sports in Pakistan on a national basis. The Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism, now has control over the Pakistan Sports Board. The PSB controls all 39 sporting federations. The Pakistan Sports Board is supported by the Pakistan Sports Trust, which assists hard up players and associations so they can continue participating in sports.

Over recent years there has been an increase in sporting activity in Pakistan, with Pakistani sportsmen and women participating at many national and international events. Also, more international tournaments now take place in Pakistan. The size of the teams Pakistan sends, and the number of events they participate in, such as the Olympic Games, Asian Games, World Games, and Commonwealth Games has increased since the turn of the century.

Zarf (festival)

Zarf is the annual college fest which was first started in the year 2011 organized by the students of Zakir Husain College Of Engineering and Technology which comes under Aligarh Muslim University stationed at Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh. It is the largest annual Cultural, Literary and Technical festival of students in Aligarh Muslim University.

Academy
Venues
Team
Notable players
Tournaments
List
See also
Basket sports
Football codes
Bat-and-ball games
Stick and ball sports
Net sports
Other sports

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