Balázs Kiss

Balázs Kiss (Hungarian pronunciation: [ˈbɒlaːʒ ˈkiʃ]; born 21 March 1972) is a retired Hungarian hammer thrower. He is the 1996 Olympic champion and the 1998 European Championships silver medalist, and has two fourth places from World Championships. His personal best throw was 83.00 metres, achieved during the 1998 Golden League circuit.

Balázs Kiss
Personal information
NationalityHungarian
BornMarch 21, 1972 (age 47)
Veszprém, Hungary
Height1.88 m (6 ft 2 in)
Weight115 kg (254 lb)
Sport
Country Hungary
SportAthletics
Event(s)Hammer throw
Achievements and titles
Personal best(s)83.00 m (1998)

Early career

Kiss was born in Veszprém.[1] As a junior athlete he won the bronze medal at the 1991 European Junior Championships, with a throw of 68.40 metres.[2] The same year he had thrown 70.66 metres.[1]

Kiss then enrolled as a student in the United States. He won the 1993 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Outdoor Track and Field Championships with a throw of 75.24 metres, and later won three more titles in a row. In 1995 and 1996 he set new championship records with 79.62 metres and 80.86 metres respectively. He represented the University of Southern California[3] (USC) in the U.S. where in 1994 he became the first USC athlete in 26 years to win consecutive titles at the NCAA Track and Field Championships.[4]

International career

Kiss finished twelfth at the 1994 European Championships.[5] In 1995 he broke the 80-metre barrier for the first time, his season's best being 82.56 metres, achieved in Veszprém in August. He participated at the 1995 World Championships, and finished fourth.[1] Kiss was almost two metres short of the bronze medal, which was won by compatriot Tibor Gécsek.[6] However, Kiss won the gold medal at the 1995 Summer Universiade.[7]

In 1996 Kiss won the Olympic gold medal with a throw of 81.24 metres. He also finished fourth at the Grand Prix Final. His season's best throw was 81.76 metres, achieved in July in Nice. In 1997 Kiss competed at the World Championships, but finished fourth for the second time.[1] He did defend his Universiade gold medal, though, winning the 1997 Summer Universiade. Like in 1995, he finished ahead of a Ukrainian and a Russian.[7] His 82.90 metre throw from Veszprém in July was a new personal best. In June 1998 Kiss threw the hammer 83.00 metres in the Meeting Gaz de France Golden League meet. This would be his lifetime best performance.[1] He later won silver medals both at the European Championships, again behind Tibor Gécsek,[8] and the Grand Prix Final.[1]

Participations at the World Championships in 1999 and 2001 followed. In 1999 he failed to reach the final, whereas in 2001 he finished sixth. In 2002 he finished fourth at the European Championships and third at the Grand Prix Final. His best throw between 1999 and 2002 was 81.36 metres, achieved in July 2001 in Cottbus.[1] Kiss became the Hungarian champion in 1995, 1998 and 2000, rivalling with Tibor Gécsek, Adrián Annus and Zsolt Németh.[9]

He announced his retirement in July 2004. He stands 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) tall, and during his active career he weighed 117 kilograms (258 lb).[1]

Awards

Ribbon

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Balázs Kiss at IAAF. http://www.gbrathletics.com/ic/ejm.htm. Retrieved on 13 February 2009.
  2. ^ "European Junior Championships (Men)". GBR Athletics. Athletics Weekly. Archived from the original on 3 March 2009. Retrieved 13 February 2009.
  3. ^ "NCAA Division I Championships (Men)". GBR Athletics. Athletics Weekly. Archived from the original on 25 February 2009. Retrieved 13 February 2009.
  4. ^ USC's Kiss captures hammer throw 06/02/1994 | Archives | Chron.com - Houston Chronicle
  5. ^ Men 100m European Championships 1994 Helsinki (FIN) - Sunday 08.08 . Todor. Retrieved on 2012-06-21.
  6. ^ "Results - HAMMER THROW - Men - Final". IAAF. Archived from the original on 15 March 2009. Retrieved 13 February 2009.
  7. ^ a b "World Student Games (Universiade - Men)". GBR Athletics. Athletics Weekly. Archived from the original on 11 February 2009. Retrieved 13 February 2009.
  8. ^ "History of the European Athletics Championships". European Athletics Association. Archived from the original on 6 October 2009. Retrieved 13 February 2009.
  9. ^ "Hungarian Championships". GBR Athletics. Athletics Weekly. Retrieved 13 February 2009.
1998 European Athletics Championships – Men's hammer throw

These are the official results of the Men's hammer throw event at the 1998 European Championships in Budapest, Hungary. Thirty-six athletes took part. The qualification mark was set at 77.00 metres.

2009 World Wrestling Championships – Men's Greco-Roman 96 kg

The men's Greco-Roman 96 kg is a competition featured at the 2009 World Wrestling Championships, and was held at the Messecenter Herning exhibition center in Herning, Denmark on September 26.

2013 World Wrestling Championships – Men's Greco-Roman 96 kg

The men's Greco-Roman 96 kg was a competition at the 2013 World Wrestling Championships, held at the László Papp Budapest Sports Arena in Budapest, Hungary, on September 21.

2017 European Wrestling Championships – Men's Greco-Roman 98 kg

The Men's Greco-Roman 98 kg is a competition featured at the 2017 European Wrestling Championships, and was held in Novi Sad, Serbia on May 6.

2017 World Wrestling Championships – Men's Greco-Roman 98 kg

The men's Greco-Roman 98 kilograms is a competition featured at the 2017 World Wrestling Championships, and was held in Paris, France on August 21.

2018 European Wrestling Championships – Men's Greco-Roman 97 kg

The Men's Greco-Roman 97 kg is a competition featured at the 2018 European Wrestling Championships, and was held in Kaspiysk, Russia on May 1 and May 2.

2018 ICF Canoe Sprint World Championships – Men's C-4 500 metres

The men's C-4 500 metres competition at the 2018 ICF Canoe Sprint World Championships in Montemor-o-Velho took place at the Centro de Alto Rendimento de Montemor-o-Velho.

2018 World Wrestling Championships – Men's Greco-Roman 97 kg

The men's Greco-Roman 97 kilograms is a competition featured at the 2018 World Wrestling Championships, and was held in Budapest, Hungary on 27 and 28 October.

Athletics at the 1993 Summer Universiade

At the 1993 Summer Universiade, the athletics events were held at the University at Buffalo Stadium in Amherst, New York in the United States from July 14 to 18. A total of 43 events were contested, of which 23 by male and 20 by female athletes.

Variable and windy conditions meant that performances were lower compared to previous years. However, two Universiade records were broken during the competition; Kenya's Kennedy Manyisa improved the men's marathon time and Robert Korzeniowski of Poland bettered the 20 km walk standard. The women's 3000 metres was contested for the last time at the games and it was replaced by the 5000 metres from 1995 onwards.Derrick Adkins, István Bagyula, Aleksandr Klimenko and Robert Korzeniowski, champions at the 1991 Universiade, all returned and defended their titles. Korzeniowski and Adkins went on to win Olympic gold medals at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics, as did hammer throw runner-up Balázs Kiss and pole vault bronze medallist Jean Galfione. Moroccan Khalid Khannouchi won his first international medal in the 5000 metres and permanently settled in the United States around this period.The United States, the host nation, easily topped the medal table with fourteen gold medals and thirty-seven medals in total. Poland won the next highest number of events, with three gold medallists, while Cuba had the next highest total medal tally with eight medals. Germany, Romania, Ukraine and Japan were other nations who performed well. Thirty-seven nations reached the medal table in the athletics competition. All athletes from Yugoslavia competed as independent participants, due to United Nations sanctions.

Athletics at the 1995 Summer Universiade

At the 1995 Summer Universiade, the athletics events were held at the Hakatanomori Athletic Stadium in Fukuoka, Japan from 29 August to 3 September. A total of 43 events were contested, of which 23 by male and 20 by female athletes.

The medal table ended closely, with the United States, Russia and host nation Japan each winning five gold medals. The United States had the highest number of silver medals (six) while Russia had the largest medal haul with sixteen medals in total. Romania managed four gold medals, all of them in the women's competition, while Italy had the third greatest number of medals with ten. Thirty-six nations reached the medal table in the athletics competition. The gold medals won by sprinter Eswort Coombs from Saint Vincent and the Grenadines and hurdler Nicole Ramalalanirina of Madagascar were their countries' only medals at the 1995 Universiade.

Two Universiade records were broken at the competition: the United States men's 4×400 metres relay team ran a time of 3:00.40 minutes and Italy's Annarita Sidoti set a new 10 km walk record. Furthermore, Šárka Kašpárková equalled the women's triple jump standard. Romania's Gabriela Szabo took two gold medals – winning the 1500 metres and 5000 metres – beginning an international career which would see her win three world titles and an Olympic gold. Future Olympic sprint medallists Obadele Thompson and Ekaterini Thanou were runners-up in the 100 metres races.

Abdelkader Chékhémani, Iulia Negură and Heike Meissner all defended their respective 1993 titles, while Hungary's István Bagyula took his third consecutive pole vault gold medal. Men's hammer throw winner Balázs Kiss went on to win the Olympic title in 1996 and the women's discus throw champion Natalya Sadova was the Olympic silver medallist that same year. The 1990 European champion Dragutin Topić was the winner of the men's high jump.

In the event programme, the women's 3000 metres was replaced by the 5000 metres for the first time, matching the IAAF's changes at the 1995 World Championships in Athletics earlier that August. The 1995 competition featured the last Universiade marathon races, as the distance was replaced by the shorter half marathon event at future editions.

Athletics at the 1996 Summer Olympics – Men's hammer throw

These are the official results of the Men's Hammer Throw event at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. There were a total number of 37 competitors, with twelve athletes reaching the final. The eight highest-ranked competitors after three rounds qualified for the final three throws to decide the medals. The qualification mark was set at 76.50 metres.

Athletics at the 1997 Summer Universiade

The athletics at the 1997 Summer Universiade took place in the Stadio Cibali in Catania, Sicily (Italy) at the end of August 1997, shortly after the World Championships in Athens, Greece. New events were the women's hammer throw, pole vault and half marathon competition. The marathon was dropped from the programme in favour of the half distance. A total of 23 men's and 22 women's events were contested (the difference being that steeplechase was held for men only).

The United States topped the athletics medal table (as it had in 1995) with a total of 21 medals, eight of them gold. Russia was the next most successful nation, with six golds among its haul of 16 medals. Ukraine won five gold medals, while Cuba won four events and had the third highest medal total at twelve. The host nation, Italy, won eight medals. A total of 34 nations reached the medal table.

Among the 1995 men's champions, Ukrainian shot putter Yuriy Bilonoh and hammer thrower Balázs Kiss of Hungary successfully defended their titles. On the women's side, double distance champion Gabriela Szabo won the 1500 metres again and Russia's Natalya Sadova repeated as discus throw winner. Student-athletes Szabo, Iván Pedroso (long jump) Yoelbi Quesada (triple jump) and Marius Corbett (javelin) won both Universiade and World Championships gold medals that year, though there was an upset in the Universiade racewalking events, as world champion and world leader Annarita Sidoti only managed third place.

Athletics at the 1997 Summer Universiade – Men's hammer throw

The men's hammer throw event at the 1997 Summer Universiade was held at the Stadio Cibali in Catania, Italy. The final took place on 26 August.

Balázs Kiss (wrestler)

Balázs Kiss (born 27 January 1983) is a Hungarian Greco-Roman wrestler. He won the bronze medal in the 96 kg division at the 2013 World Wrestling Championships.

Imre Szitás

Imre Szitás (born September 4, 1961 in Mosonmagyaróvár, Győr-Moson-Sopron) is a retired male hammer thrower from Hungary, who represented his native country at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Korea. He set his personal best (80.60 metres) on July 11, 1988 in Szombathely.

Kiss (surname)

Kiss is a very common Hungarian surname, derived from kis, meaning "small". The name was applied as a nickname for a person of small stature or the younger of two bearers of the same personal name. It may refer to:

Antal Kiss (born 1935), Hungarian athlete

August Kiss (1802—1865), German sculptor

Balázs Kiss (born 1972), Hungarian athlete

Balázs Kiss (wrestler), Hungarian Greco-Roman wrestler

Béla Kiss (1877—?), Hungarian serial killer

Cássia Kiss (born 1958), Brazilian actress

Dániel Kiss (athlete) (born 1982), Hungarian athlete

Elizabeth Kiss (born 1961), U.S. academic

Gergely Kiss (born 1977), Hungarian water polo player

Géza Kiss (1882—1952), Hungarian freestyle swimmer

György Kiss (footballer) (born 1975), Hungarian football player

István Kiss (disambiguation), multiple people

László Kiss (footballer) (born 1956), Hungarian football coach

Les Kiss (born 1964), Australian rugby league footballer of the 1980s and 1990s

Manyi Kiss (1911—1971), Hungarian actress

Nicky Kiss, British rugby league footballer of the 1970s and 1980s

Péter Kiss (1959—2014), Hungarian politician

Robert S. Kiss (born 1957), U.S. politician

Tamás Pál Kiss (born 1991), Hungarian racing driver

Zoltán Kiss (born 1980), Hungarian football player

Sándor Eckschmiedt

Sándor Eckschmiedt (born 25 October 1938) is a Hungarian athlete. He competed in the men's hammer throw at the 1964, 1968 and the 1972 Summer Olympics.

Wrestling at the 2016 Summer Olympics – Men's Greco-Roman 98 kg

Men's Greco-Roman 98 kg competition at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, took place on August 16 at the Carioca Arena 2 in Barra da Tijuca.This Greco-Roman wrestling competition consists of a single-elimination tournament, with a repechage used to determine the winner of two bronze medals. The two finalists face off for gold and silver medals. Each wrestler who loses to one of the two finalists moves into the repechage, culminating in a pair of bronze medal matches featuring the semifinal losers each facing the remaining repechage opponent from their half of the bracket.

Each bout consists of a single round within a six-minute limit. The wrestler who scores more points in each round is the winner of that rounds; the bout ends when one wrestler has won two rounds (and thus the match).

The medals for the competition were presented by Stefan Holm, IOC member, Sweden, and the gifts were presented by Daulet Turlykhanov, Bureau Member of UWW.

Zoltán Fábián

Zoltán Fábián (born 22 April 1969) is a male hammer thrower from Hungary. His personal best throw is 78.20 metres, achieved in June 1998 in Budapest.He competed at the 1994 European Championships and the 1997 World Championships, but without reaching the final. He never became national champion; the competition from Tibor Gécsek, Balázs Kiss, Adrián Annus and Zsolt Németh was too strong, but he did win a bronze medal in 1994.Continuing as a Masters athlete, he won the M45 division at the 2015 World Masters Athletics Championships.

Summer Universiade champions in men's hammer throw
Hungarian Athletics Championships winners in Men's Hammer Throw

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