Baeolophus

Baeolophus is a genus of birds in the family Paridae. Its members are commonly known as titmice. All the species are native to North America. In the past, most authorities retained Baeolophus as a subgenus within the genus Parus, but treatment as a distinct genus, initiated by the American Ornithological Society, is now widely accepted.[1]

Titmice
Tufted Titmouse-27527-2
Baeolophus bicolor
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Paridae
Genus: Baeolophus
Cabanis, 1850
Baeolophus distribution map
Range of Baeolophus

Taxonomy

The genus contains the five species:[2]

Image Scientific name Common Name Distribution
Bridled Titmouse (Baeolophus wollweberi) (16875140301) Baeolophus wollweberi Bridled titmouse Arizona and New Mexico to Southern Mexico
Baeolophus inornatus -San Luis Obispo, California, USA-8 Baeolophus inornatus Oak titmouse Pacific coast from Baja California to Oregon
Baeolophus ridgwayi Arizona Baeolophus ridgwayi Juniper titmouse The Great Basin and adjacent areas
Tufted Titmouse (24611352525) Baeolophus bicolor Tufted titmouse East of the Mississippi and from lower Canada to the Everglades
Black-crested Titmouse Baeolophus atricristatus Black-crested titmouse Missouri to east-central Mexico

References

  1. ^ Del Hoyo, J.; Elliot, A. & Christie D. (editors). (2007). Handbook of the Birds of the World. Volume 12: Picathartes to Tits and Chickadees. Lynx Edicions. ISBN 978-84-96553-42-2
  2. ^ Gill, Frank; Donsker, David (eds.). "Waxwings and their allies, tits & penduline tits". World Bird List Version 6.1. International Ornithologists' Union. Retrieved 15 February 2016.
Black-crested titmouse

The black-crested titmouse (Baeolophus atricristatus) (also known as the Mexican titmouse), is a small songbird, a passerine bird in the tit family Paridae. Once considered a subspecies of the tufted titmouse (B. bicolor), it was recognized as a separate species in 2002. It is native to southern Texas, Oklahoma, and east-central Mexico. Vagrants have been seen as far north and east as St. Louis, Missouri.

The bird is 5.5 to 6.0 in (14 to 15 cm) long, with rusty flanks, gray upperparts, and a whitish belly. The male has a long, dark black crest that is usually erect, while the female's crest is not as dark. It is common wherever trees grow, whether they are deciduous, heavy timber, or urban shade trees. Its call peter, peter, peter is similar to that of the tufted titmouse, but shorter. Its diet consists of berries, nuts, spiders, insects, and insect eggs.

The black-crested titmouse nests in tree cavities, telephone poles, fence posts, and bird boxes. The eggs, four to seven of which are laid in March or April, are white with reddish-brown spots.

Bridled titmouse

The bridled titmouse (Baeolophus wollweberi) is a small songbird, a passerine bird in the tit family Paridae.

These birds range from 11.5 – 12.7 cm. (4.5 to 5 in.) long. It is small, crested and gray with a black and white patterned face, a black bib. Its crest is boarded with black and white (sometimes gray) underparts. A standard nest ranges from 5 – 9 eggs colored white, speckled, or reddish brown.Their preferred habitat are oak or oak-juniper mixed woodland riparian areas of mountains in eastern and southeastern Arizona – (the Mogollon Plateau and White Mountains of Arizona), and extreme southwestern New Mexico – (the Madrean sky islands region of the eastern Sonora Desert) in the United States to southern Mexico. They nest in a hole in a tree, either a natural cavity or sometimes an old woodpecker nest found 4 – 28 ft. off the ground. They line the nest with soft materials. Usually built from loose cups of cottonwood down, stems, leaves, and grass.These birds are permanent residents and may join small mixed flocks in winter.

They forage actively on branches, sometimes on the ground, mainly eating insects, especially caterpillars, but also seeds, nuts and berries. They will store food for later use.

The song is usually described as a whistled pidi-pidi-pidi-pidi. They make a variety of different sounds, most having a similar tone quality.

Ground tit

The ground tit, Tibetan ground-tit or Hume's ground-tit (Pseudopodoces humilis) is a bird of the Tibetan plateau north of the Himalayas. The peculiar appearance confused ornithologists in the past who called it as Hume's groundpecker and still later as Hume's ground jay or Tibetan ground jay assuming that it belonged to the family Corvidae that includes the crows and jays. Although morphologically confusing, the species has since been identified using molecular sequence comparisons as being a member of the tit family (Paridae) and is the only species in the genus Pseudopodoces. It is found in the Tibetan Plateau of China, India, Nepal & Bhutan.

Juniper titmouse

The juniper titmouse (Baeolophus ridgwayi) is a passerine bird in the tit family Paridae. The American Ornithologists' Union split the plain titmouse into the oak titmouse and the juniper titmouse in 1996, due to distinct differences in song, preferred habitat, and genetic makeup.The juniper titmouse is a small, gray bird with small tuft or crest. The face is plain, and the undersides are a lighter gray. Sexes are similar.

This titmouse lives year-round primarily in the Great Basin, but is resident from southeastern Oregon and central Colorado south to the eastern Mojave Desert in California and central Arizona, as far as west Texas and extreme northeastern Sonora, Mexico-(the Madrean sky islands). Prefers open woodlands of warm, dry pinyon-juniper, juniper and desert riparian woods.

Juniper titmice will sleep in cavities, dense foliage, or birdhouses. When roosting in foliage, the titmouse chooses a twig surrounded by dense foliage or an accumulation of dead pine needles, simulating a roost in a cavity. It forms pairs or small groups, but does not form large flocks. It may join mixed-species flocks after breeding season for foraging.

The juniper titmouse eats insects and spiders, sometimes seen catching insects in mid air. It also takes berries, acorns, and some seeds, sometimes hammering seeds against branches to open them. The bird forages on foliage, twigs, branches, trunks, and occasionally on the ground. Strong legs and feet allows it to hang upside down to forage. Juniper titmouse is attracted to feeders with suet, peanut butter and sunflower seeds.

The song of the juniper titmouse is a rolling series of notes given on the same pitch. Its call sounds like a raspy tschick-adee.

This species builds its nest in a woodpecker hole, natural cavity, or nest box, lining it with grass, moss, mud, hair, feathers, and fur. It breeds from March into July, with peak activity in April and May, laying 3–9 eggs, usually 4–7. The female is the primary incubator, the process of which takes 14–16 days. Young are altricial, and are tended by both parents in nest for 16–21 days. Parents continue to tend to young for another three to four weeks after the young leave the nest.

The oak titmouse and juniper titmouse appear almost identical, but differ in voice as well as range. The oak titmouse has a browner back than the juniper titmouse. The oak titmouse gives a repeated series of three to seven syllables, each composed of one low and one high note, while the juniper titmouse song consists of a series of rapid syllables on the same note. Ranges overlap only in a small area in California. The tufted titmouse, which does not overlap in range, has whiter belly, rusty flanks, and black on the forehead.

List of birds of New Mexico

This list of birds of New Mexico are the species documented in the U.S. state of New Mexico and accepted by the New Mexico Bird Records Committee (NMBRC). As of January 2019, 546 species are included in the official list. Of them, 169 are on the review list (see below), five species have been introduced to North America, and three have been extirpated.

This list is presented in the taxonomic sequence of the Check-list of North and Middle American Birds, 7th edition through the 60th Supplement, published by the American Ornithological Society (AOS). Common and scientific names are also those of the Check-list

Unless otherwise noted, all species listed below are considered to occur regularly in New Mexico as permanent residents, summer or winter visitors, or migrants. These tags are used to annotate some species:

(R) Review list - birds that if seen require more comprehensive documentation than regularly seen species. These birds are considered irregular or rare in New Mexico.

(I) Introduced - a species established in North America as a result of human action

(Ex) Extirpated - a species no longer found in New Mexico but which exists elsewhere

List of birds of North America (Passeriformes)

The birds listed below all belong to the biological order Passeriformes, and are native to North America.

List of birds of Oklahoma

This list of birds of Oklahoma includes species documented in the U.S. state of Oklahoma and accepted by the Oklahoma Ornithological Society's Bird Records Committee (OBRC). As of October 2017, there were 480 species on the official list. Between then and late July 2019, one additional species has been documented in eBird. Of the 481 species, 121 are classified as accidental, seven have been introduced to North America, two are known to be extinct, and two others might be extinct. An additional 16 species are classed as either hypothetical or of uncertain origin; 13 of them are also classed as accidental.

This list is presented in the taxonomic sequence of the Check-list of North and Middle American Birds, 7th edition through the 60th Supplement, published by the American Ornithological Society (AOS). Common and scientific names are also those of the Check-list.

Unless otherwise noted, all species listed below are considered to occur regularly in Oklahoma as permanent residents, summer or winter visitors, or migrants. These tags are used to annotate some species:

(A) Accidental - Species considered rare or accidental by Bird Checklists of the World (the OBRC does not annotate its list with this category)

(I) Introduced - a species introduced to North America by the actions of humans, either directly or indirectly

(E) Extinct - a species that no longer exists

(H) Hypothetical - "species seen in the state and supported only by written documentation" per the OBRC

(UO) Uncertain Origin - species whose provenance is unknown

List of birds of Oregon

This list of Oregon birds lists wild bird species found in the U.S. state of Oregon and accepted by the Oregon Bird Records Committee (OBRC). As of November 2018, there are 537 species on the list. Of them, 153 are on the review list (see below). Eight species have been introduced to Oregon or elsewhere in North America and three have been extirpated from the state.

Bird counts often change depending on factors such as the number and training of the observers, as well as opinions about what constitutes an officially recognized subspecies. Though northern climes typically do not support as many species as southerly locations, Oregon is fifth in bird species diversity in the United States, behind Florida, New Mexico, Texas and California. This amount of diversity is attributable to Oregon's numerous distinctive ecoregions and relatively mild winter weather, which make it an important wintering ground for migratory bird species, especially waterfowl, on the Pacific Flyway.

Another result of the state's varying ecology is the 120 Important Bird Areas, such as the Jackson Bottom Wetlands Preserve, that are recognized as important conservation sites for birds. Many of these dedicated wildlife refuges have become meccas for birding enthusiasts, and Oregon has participated in formally organized birding activities such as the Christmas Bird Count since the early 1900s. Other areas are closed to human access but are very popular with birds, such as Oregon Islands National Wildlife Refuge which spans some 250 miles (400 km) of the Oregon Coast.

As an important U.S. region of bird diversity, Oregon has faced some serious challenges in protecting endangered and threatened avian species. In addition to high profile, threatened species such as the northern spotted owl and snowy plover, even many common species—including Oregon's state bird, the western meadowlark—have declined considerably due to hunting, habitat loss and other factors.This list is presented in the taxonomic sequence of the Check-list of North and Middle American Birds, 7th edition through the 60th Supplement, published by the American Ornithological Society (AOS). Common and scientific names are also those of the Check-list.

Unless otherwise noted, all species listed below are considered to occur regularly in Oregon as permanent residents, summer or winter visitors, or migrants. These tags are used to annotate some species:

(R) Review list - birds that if seen require more comprehensive documentation than regularly seen species.

(I) Introduced - a species established as a result of human action

List of birds of Saskatchewan

This list of birds of Saskatchewan includes all the bird species confirmed in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan as determined by Nature Saskatchewan. As of September 2017, there were 436 species on the Nature Saskatchewan checklist. Of these species, 86 are considered stragglers and 43 are hypothetical; both terms are defined below. Ten species have been introduced to Saskatchewan or elsewhere in North America. One species is extinct, two have been extirpated, and another might be extinct. Between when the Nature Saskatchewan list was published and August 2019, one additional species has been documented in eBird.Only birds that are considered to have established, self-sustaining, wild populations are included on this list. This means that birds that are considered probable escapees, although they may have been sighted flying free, are not included.

This list is presented in the taxonomic sequence of the Check-list of North and Middle American Birds, 7th edition through the 60th Supplement, published by the American Ornithological Society (AOS). Common and scientific names are also those of the Check-list except that Canadian English spelling is used.

The following tags are used to describe some categories of occurrence.

(S) Straggler - species with 30 or fewer records per Nature Saskatchewan

(H) Hypothetical - species lacking a specimen, photograph, or sound recording per Nature Saskatchewan; these also are "stragglers" but are not marked as such

(I) Introduced - established solely as result of human intervention, either directly in Saskatchewan or elsewhere in North America

List of birds of Texas

The list of birds of Texas is the official list of species recorded in the U.S. state of Texas according to the Texas Bird Records Committee (TBRC) of the Texas Ornithological Society. As of August 2019, the list contained 651 species. Of them, 161 are considered review species. Six species were introduced to Texas, two are known to be extinct and another is thought to be, and a fourth is extirpated and possibly extinct.

This list is presented in the taxonomic sequence of the Check-list of North and Middle American Birds, 7th edition through the 60th Supplement, published by the American Ornithological Society (AOS). Common and scientific names are also those of the Check-list.

Unless otherwise noted, all species listed below are considered to occur regularly in Texas as permanent residents, summer or winter visitors, or migrants. These tags are used to annotate some species:

(R) Review species- species "for which documentation for review is requested for any record" by the TBRC

(I) Introduced – introduced to Texas by humans, directly or indirectly.

(E) Extinct – species which no longer exist

(e) (lowercase) Extirpated – no longer found in Texas but exists elsewhere

(RI) Reintroduction in progress - per the TBRC, two species are present but have not been reestablished following earlier extirpation

(u) uncertain – per the TBRC, two species have "stable to increasing populations of introduced/native origin"

List of birds of Yuma County, Arizona

This is a list of birds of Yuma County, Arizona, United States. The following markings are used:

(A) Accidental - occurrence based on fewer than 10 records and unlikely to occur regularly

(E) Extinct - a recent species that no longer exists

(Ex) Extirpated - a species that no longer occurs in Yuma County, Arizona, but other populations exist elsewhere

(I) Introduced - a population established solely as the result of direct or indirect human intervention; synonymous with non-native and non-indigenous

(H) Hypothetical - birds that have had a credible sighting reported, but have not been documented with a specimen or suitable photograph

(C) Casual - occasional visitor

(SW) = found in the southwest of Arizona, Yuma County.

sw–06 = observed in 2006.

( * SW)—SW breeding species.

Bolded, species: (ex: Gambel's quail), hot, lower desert species. (There are exceptions.)

(–L–)–16 species are found local, in a specific locality.

LCRV– Lower Colorado River Valley

List of birds of the Klamath Basin

The following bird species are found in the Klamath Basin, Oregon, and related areas; (a few species listed are only "native" and have a larger continental range). The Klamath Basin is within the Pacific Flyway so, over 350 species can be spotted migrating through the flyover.

List of birds of the Sierra Madre Occidental

This is a list of birds whose range includes, at least in part, the Sierra Madre Occidental, a mountain range in western Mexico and the extreme southwest of the United States.

Bright-rumped attila, Attila spadiceus

Lazuli bunting, Passerina amoena

Bushtit, Psaltriparus minimus

Mexican chickadee, Poecile sclateri

American dipper, Cinclus mexicanus

Blue-hooded euphonia, Euphonia elegantissima

Cordilleran flycatcher, Empidonax occidentalis

Hammond's flycatcher, Empidonax hammondii

Pine flycatcher, Empidonax affinis

Evening grosbeak, Coccothraustes vespertinus

Yellow grosbeak, Pheucticus chrysopeplus

Rusty-crowned ground-sparrow, Melozone kieneri

Blue-throated hummingbird, Lampornis clemenciae

Broad-tailed hummingbird, Selasphorus platycercus

Magnificent hummingbird, Eugenes fulgens

White-eared hummingbird, Hylocharis leucotis

Mexican jay, Aphelocoma ultramarina

White-tailed kite, Elanus leucurus

Black-throated magpie-jay, Calocitta colliei

Purple martin, Progne subis

Buff-collared nightjar, Antrostomus ridgwayi

Pygmy nuthatch, Sitta pygmaea

Elf owl, Micrathene whitneyi

Flammulated owl, Otus flammeolus

Spotted owl, Strix occidentalis

Whiskered screech-owl, Megascops trichopsis

Thick-billed parrot, Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha

Western wood pewee, Contopus sordidulus

Band-tailed pigeon, Patagioenas fasciata

Elegant quail, Callipepla douglasii

Montezuma quail, Cyrtonyx montezumae

Eared quetzal, Euptilotis neoxenus

Painted redstart, Myioborus pictus

Townsend's solitaire, Myadestes townsendi

Five-striped sparrow, Amphispiza quinquestriata

Rufous-crowned sparrow, Aimophila ruficeps

Plain-capped starthroat, Heliomaster constantii

Vaux's swift, Chaetura vauxi

White-throated swift, Aeronautes saxatalis

Flame-colored tanager, Piranga bidentata

Hepatic tanager, Piranga flava

Red-headed tanager, Piranga erythrocephala

Bridled titmouse, Baeolophus wollweberi

Spotted towhee, Pipilo maculatus

Hutton's vireo, Vireo huttoni

Plumbeous vireo, Vireo plumbeus

Yellow-green vireo, Vireo flavoviridis

Golden-browed warbler, Basileuterus belli

Grace's warbler, Setophaga graciae

Hermit warbler, Setophaga occidentalis

Red warbler, Cardellina ruber

Red-faced warbler, Cardellina rubrifrons

Yellow warbler, Setophaga petechia

Acorn woodpecker, Melanerpes formicivorus

Arizona woodpecker, Picoides arizonae

List of birds of the Sierra Madre Oriental

This is a list of birds whose range includes, at least in part, the Sierra Madre Oriental, a mountain range in northeastern Mexico.

As a twin mountain range to the Sierra Madre Occidentals, some species will occur in both; because of the separation by the Mexican Plateau some will occur only in one range. A few species are regionally endemic.

Bushtit, Psaltriparus minimus

Great curassow, Crax rubra

Greenish elaenia, Myiopagis viridicata

White-bellied emerald, Amazilia candida

Blue-hooded euphonia, Euphonia elegantissima

Barred forest-falcon, Micrastur ruficollis

Boat-billed flycatcher, Megarynchus pitangua

Cordilleran flycatcher, Empidonax occidentalis

Hammond's flycatcher, Empidonax hammondii

Pine flycatcher, Empidonax affinis

Crested guan, Penelope purpurascens

Ornate hawk-eagle, Spizaetus ornatus

Blue-throated hummingbird, Lampornis clemenciae

Broad-tailed hummingbird, Selasphorus platycercus

Magnificent hummingbird, Eugenes fulgens

White-eared hummingbird, Hylocharis leucotis

Mexican jay, Aphelocoma ultramarina

Unicolored jay, Aphelocoma unicolor

Montezuma oropendola, Psarocolius montezuma

Flammulated owl, Otus flammeolus

Whiskered screech-owl, Megascops trichopsis

Maroon-fronted parrot, Rhynchopsitta terrisi

Western wood pewee, Contopus sordidulus

Band-tailed pigeon, Patagioenas fasciata

Painted redstart, Myioborus pictus

Black-headed saltator, Saltator atriceps

Slate-coloured solitaire, Myadestes unicolor

Rufous-crowned sparrow, Aimophila ruficeps

Vaux's swift, Chaetura vauxi

White-throated swift, Aeronautes saxatalis

Flame-colored tanager, Piranga bidentata

Hepatic tanager, Piranga flava

Bridled titmouse, Baeolophus wollweberi

Emerald toucanet, Aulacorhynchus prasinus

Spotted towhee, Pipilo maculatus

Gartered trogon, Trogon caligatus

Hutton's vireo, Vireo huttoni

Yellow-green vireo, Vireo flavoviridis

Golden-browed warbler, Basileuterus belli

Hermit warbler, Dendroica occidentalis

Hooded warbler, Wilsonia citrina

Red warbler, Cardellina ruber

Red-faced warbler, Cardellina rubrifrons

Spot-crowned woodcreeper, Lepidocolaptes affinis

Acorn woodpecker, Melanerpes formicivorus

Oak titmouse

The oak titmouse (Baeolophus inornatus) is a passerine bird in the tit family Paridae. The American Ornithologists' Union split the plain titmouse into the oak titmouse and the juniper titmouse in 1996, due to distinct differences in song, preferred habitat, and genetic makeup.The oak titmouse is a small, brown-tinged gray bird with small tuft or crest. The face is plain, and the undersides are a lighter gray. Sexes are similar, as there is very little to no sexual dimorphism.

This species lives year-round on the Pacific slope, resident from southern Oregon south through California west of the Sierra Nevada to Baja California, but its range surrounds the central San Joaquin Valley. It prefers open woodlands of warm, dry oak and oak-pine at low to mid-elevations but can also be found in forests as long as adequate oak trees are present.

The oak titmouse will sleep in cavities, dense foliage or birdhouses. When roosting in foliage, the titmouse chooses a twig surrounded by dense foliage or an accumulation of dead pine needles, simulating a roost in a cavity. It forms pairs or small groups, but does not form large flocks. It may join mixed-species flocks after breeding season for foraging. Pairs stay together after the breeding season.

Oak titmice eat insects and spiders, and are sometimes seen catching insects in mid air. They will also take berries, acorns, and some seeds. This species forages on foliage, twigs, branches, trunks, and occasionally on ground, sometimes hanging upside down to forage, and hammering seeds against branches to open them. Oak titmice are attracted to feeders with suet, peanut butter and sunflower seeds.

The song of the oak titmouse is a series of repeated whistled notes of three to seven syllables, with first syllable higher in pitch than the following one. The call is a scratchy tsicka-dee-dee.

The oak titmouse builds its nest in a woodpecker hole, a natural cavity, or a nest box, using grass, moss, mud, hair, feathers, and fur. It breeds from March into July, with peak activity in April and May, laying 3–9 eggs, usually 6–8. The female is the primary incubator, with incubation taking 14–16 days. Young are altricial and are tended by both parents in nest for 16–21 days. Parents continue to tend to young for another three to four weeks after they leave the nest.

The oak titmouse and juniper titmouse appear almost identical, but differ in voice as well as range. The oak titmouse has a browner back than the juniper titmouse. The oak titmouse gives a repeated series of three to seven syllables, each comprising one low and one high note, while the juniper titmouse song consists of a series of rapid syllables on the same note. Ranges overlap only in a small area in California. The tufted titmouse, which does not overlap in range, has a whiter belly, rusty flanks, and black on the forehead.

Sultan tit

The sultan tit (Melanochlora sultanea) is a large songbird (about 17 cm long) with a yellow crest, dark bill, black upperparts plumage and yellow underparts. The sexes are similar. The female has greenish black upperparts and yellowish throat. The young bird is duller than the adult and has a shorter crest. It is the only member of the monotypic genus Melanochlora, which is fairly distinct from the Parus tits with the nearest relative being the monotypic Sylviparus.

Tit (bird)

The tits, chickadees, and titmice constitute the Paridae, a large family of small passerine birds which occur mainly in the Northern Hemisphere and Africa. Most were formerly classified in the genus Parus.

While commonly referred to as "tits" throughout much of the English-speaking world, these birds are called either "chickadees" (onomatopoeic, derived from their distinctive "chick-a dee dee dee" alarm call) or "titmice" in North America. The name titmouse is recorded from the 14th century, composed of the Old English name for the bird, mase (Proto-Germanic *maison, German Meise), and tit, denoting something small. The former spelling, "titmose", was influenced by mouse in the 16th century. Emigrants to New Zealand presumably identified some of the superficially similar birds of the genus Petroica of the family Petroicidae, the Australian robins, as members of the tit family, giving them the title tomtit, although, in fact, they are not related.

These birds are mainly small, stocky, woodland species with short, stout bills. Some have crests. They range in length from 10 to 22 cm. They are adaptable birds, with a mixed diet including seeds and insects. Many species live around human habitation and come readily to bird feeders for nuts or seed, and learn to take other foods.

Titmouse (disambiguation)

Titmouse may refer to:

Baeolophus, the genus of bird commonly known as titmice

Tit (bird), the European titmouse

Titmouse, Inc., a U.S. animation studio

Pointing stick, a style of computer mouse

Tufted titmouse

The tufted titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor) is a small songbird from North America, a species in the tit and chickadee family (Paridae). Relatively "larger than a chickadee", the black-crested titmouse, found from central and southern Texas southwards, was included as a subspecies but is now considered a separate species (Baeolophus atricristatus).These small birds are approximately 6 inches in length, with a white front, and grey upper body outlined with rust colored flanks. Other characteristics include their black forehead, and the tufted grey crest on their head.The song of the tufted titmouse is usually described as a whistled peter-peter-peter, though this song can vary in approximately 20 notable ways.The bird's habitat is deciduous and mixed woods as well as gardens, parks and shrublands. Though the tufted titmouse is non-migratory and originally native to Ohio and Mississippi, factors such as bird feeders have caused these birds to occupy a larger amount of territory across the United States and stretching into Ontario, Canada. From 1966 - 2015 the tufted titmouse population has increased by more than 1.5% per year throughout the northeastern US, Michigan and Wisconsin.The tufted titmouse forages on branches and sometimes on the ground. It eats mainly insects, especially caterpillars, but also seeds, nuts, and berries, and will store food for later use. It can be curious about humans and will sometimes perch on a window ledge and seem to be peering into the house. It is a regular visitor around bird feeders. Its normal pattern is to scout a feeder from cover, fly in to take a seed, then fly back to cover to eat it.Tufted titmice nest in a hole in a tree, either a natural cavity, a man-made nest box, or sometimes an old woodpecker nest. They line the nest with soft materials, sometimes plucking hair from a live animal such as a dog. If they find shed snake skin, they will try to incorporate pieces of it in their nest. Their eggs are under an inch long and are white or cream-colored with brownish or purplish spots.The lifespan of the tufted titmouse is approximately 2.1 years, though they can live for more than 10 years. These birds will on average have a clutch size of 5 to 7 eggs. Unlike many birds, the offspring of tufted titmice will often stay with their parents during the winter, and even after the first year of their life. Sometimes, a bird born the year before will help its parents raise the next year's young.

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