Bad Hat Harry Productions

Bad Hat Harry Productions is an American film and television production company founded in 1994 by director Bryan Singer. It has produced such films as The Usual Suspects and the X-Men film series, as well as the television series House. The name is a homage to Steven Spielberg and comes from a line uttered by Roy Scheider in the 1975 feature Jaws. Martin Brody says to an elderly swimmer who teases him about not going in the water, "That's some bad hat, Harry." The original 2004 logo paid homage to this scene. The current logo, introduced in 2011, is taken from the police lineup scene of The Usual Suspects.

Bad Hat Harry Productions
Private
IndustryMotion pictures and television
Founded1994
FounderBryan Singer
Headquarters,
ProductsMotion Pictures
WebsiteBryanSinger.com

Filmography

Year Film Director Co-produced by Budget Gross (worldwide)
1995 The Usual Suspects Bryan Singer Gramercy Pictures
PolyGram Filmed Entertainment
Spelling Films International
Blue Parrot Productions
$6 million $23 million
1998 Apt Pupil TriStar Pictures
Phoenix Pictures
$14 million $8.9 million
2000 X-Men 20th Century Fox
Marvel Entertainment
The Donners' Company
$75 million $296 million
2003 X2 $110 million $407 million
2006 Superman Returns Warner Bros.
Legendary Pictures
DC Entertainment
Peters Entertainment
$204 million $391 million
2008 Valkyrie Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
United Artists
Cruise/Wagner Productions
Babelsberg Studio
$75 million $200 million
2009 Trick 'r Treat Michael Dougherty Warner Bros.
Legendary Pictures
$12 million $13.5 million
2011 X-Men: First Class Matthew Vaughn 20th Century Fox
Dune Entertainment
Marvel Entertainment
The Donners’ Company
Ingenious Media
$140–160 million $353 million
2013 Jack the Giant Slayer Bryan Singer Warner Bros.
New Line Cinema
Legendary Pictures
Original Film
Big Kid Pictures
$185–200 million $197 million
2014 X-Men: Days of Future Past 20th Century Fox
TSG Entertainment
Marvel Entertainment
The Donners’ Company
$200 million $739 million
2016 X-Men: Apocalypse 20th Century Fox
TSG Entertainment
Marvel Entertainment
The Donners’ Company
Kinberg Genre
$178 million $543 million

Television

Year(s) active Title Creator(s) Network Co-produced by
2004–2012 House David Shore Fox Universal Television, Heel and Toe Films and Shore Z Productions
2012–2013 H+: The Digital Series John Cabrera and Cosimo De Tommaso YouTube Warner Premiere Digital and Dolphin Entertainment
2012 Mockingbird Lane Allan Burns and Chris Hayward NBC Universal Television and Living Dead Guy Productions
2014 Black Box Amy Holden Jones ABC Bold Films and Little Chicken Productions
2017–present Legion Noah Hawley FX FX Productions, Marvel Television, The Donners' Company, Kinberg Genre and 26 Keys Productions
2017–present The Gifted Matt Nix Fox 20th Century Fox Television, Marvel Television, The Donners' Company, Kinberg Genre and Flying Glass of Milk Productions
2019–present The Adventures Of The Clashers Cyrill Geshev YouTube Universal Television, Heel and Toe Films and CyrillGeshevOfficial Series

Critical reception

Year Film Rotten Tomatoes Metacritic
1995 The Usual Suspects 88%[1] 77
1998 Apt Pupil 53%[2] 51
2000 X-Men 82%[3] 64[4]
2003 X2 86%[5] 68[6]
2006 Superman Returns 75%[7] 72[8]
2008 Valkyrie 61%[9] 56[10]
2009 Trick ‘r Treat 85%[11] N/A(2 reviews)[12]
2011 X-Men: First Class 86%[13] 65[14]
2013 Jack the Giant Slayer 52%[15] 51[16]
2014 X-Men: Days of Future Past 91%[17] 74[18]
2016 X-Men: Apocalypse 48%[19] 52[20]

References

  1. ^ "The Usual Suspects". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved June 28, 2012.
  2. ^ "Apt Pupil". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved February 18, 2017.
  3. ^ "X-Men". Rotten Tomatoes (Fandango Media). Retrieved July 26, 2013.
  4. ^ "X-Men (2000): Reviews". Metacritic (CBS). Retrieved July 27, 2013.
  5. ^ "X2: X-Men United". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango Media. Retrieved July 26, 2013.
  6. ^ "X2: X-Men United (2004): Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved July 27, 2013.
  7. ^ "Superman Returns". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango Media. Retrieved September 2, 2012.
  8. ^ "Superman Returns". Metacritic. CBS. Retrieved September 2, 2012.
  9. ^ "Valkyrie Movie Reviews". Rotten Tomatoes. IGN Entertainment, Inc. Retrieved December 14, 2011.
  10. ^ "Valkyrie (2008): Reviews". Metacritic. CNET Networks, Inc. Retrieved January 21, 2009.
  11. ^ Trick r' Treat at Rotten Tomatoes
  12. ^ https://www.metacritic.com/movie/trick-r-treat
  13. ^ "X-Men: First Class". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango Media. Retrieved July 26, 2013.
  14. ^ "X-Men: First Class". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved July 27, 2013.
  15. ^ "Jack the Giant Slayer (2013)". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango Media. Retrieved March 5, 2013.
  16. ^ "Jack the Giant Slayer". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved April 4, 2013.
  17. ^ "X-Men: Days of Future Past". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango Media. Retrieved August 12, 2014.
  18. ^ "X-Men: Days of Future Past". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved August 12, 2014.
  19. ^ "X-Men: Apocalypse". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango Media. Retrieved July 26, 2016.
  20. ^ "X-Men: Apocalypse". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 6, 2016.

External links

Apt Pupil (film)

Apt Pupil is a 1998 American thriller film directed by Bryan Singer and starring Ian McKellen and Brad Renfro. It is based on the 1982 novella of the same name by Stephen King. Set in the 1980s in southern California, the film tells the fictional story of high school student Todd Bowden (Renfro), who discovers a fugitive Nazi war criminal, Kurt Dussander (McKellen), living in his neighborhood under a pseudonym. Bowden, obsessed with Nazism and the Holocaust, persuades Dussander to share his stories, and their relationship stirs malice in each of them. Singer has called Apt Pupil "a study in cruelty", with Nazism serving as a vehicle to demonstrate the capacity of evil.

The film was released in the United States and Canada in October 1998 to mixed reviews and made under $9 million. The main actors won several minor awards for their performances.

During the $14 million production, a lawsuit was filed by several extras who alleged that they were instructed to strip naked during a shower scene. The lawsuit was dismissed due to insufficient evidence.

Black Box (TV series)

Black Box is an American psychological medical drama television series which ran for one season, from April 24 to July 24, 2014, and starred Kelly Reilly and Vanessa Redgrave, on ABC. The program had a straight-to-series order with a 13-episode commitment. The series was created by Amy Holden Jones and is co-produced by Ilene Chaiken, Bryan Singer, Oliver Obst, and Anne Thomopoulos.After one season, ABC canceled Black Box on August 7, 2014.

Bryan Singer

Bryan Jay Singer (born September 17, 1965) is an American director, producer, and writer of film and television. He is the founder of Bad Hat Harry Productions and has produced or co-produced almost all of the films he has directed.

Singer wrote and directed his first film in 1988 after graduating from a university. His film, Public Access (1993), was a co-winner of the Grand Jury Prize at the 1993 Sundance Film Festival. In the mid-1990s, Singer received critical acclaim for directing the neo-noir crime thriller The Usual Suspects (1995), which starred Gabriel Byrne, Kevin Spacey, Stephen Baldwin, and Benicio del Toro. He followed this with another thriller, Apt Pupil (1998), an adaptation of a Stephen King novella about a boy's fascination with a Nazi war criminal. In the 2000s, he became known for big budget superhero films such as X-Men (2000), for which Singer won the 2000 Saturn Award for Best Direction, its sequel X2 (2003), and Superman Returns (2006). He then directed the World War II historical thriller Valkyrie (2008), co-wrote/co-produced X-Men: First Class (2011), and directed the fantasy adventure film Jack the Giant Slayer (2013), as well as two more X-Men films, X-Men: Days of Future Past (2014) and X-Men: Apocalypse (2016), and the Queen biopic Bohemian Rhapsody (2018).

In 1997 and the 2010s, a number of men alleged that Singer sexually assaulted them as minors. Singer denied all of the allegations, and several of the resulting lawsuits were dismissed.

Dark Phoenix (film)

Dark Phoenix (alternatively known as X-Men: Dark Phoenix) is an upcoming American superhero film based on Marvel Comics' X-Men characters, distributed by 20th Century Fox. It is intended to be the twelfth installment in the X-Men film series and the sequel to X-Men: Apocalypse (2016). The film is written and directed by Simon Kinberg, and stars James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Jennifer Lawrence, Nicholas Hoult, Sophie Turner, Tye Sheridan, Alexandra Shipp, Kodi Smit-McPhee, Evan Peters, and Jessica Chastain. In Dark Phoenix, the X-Men must face the full power of the Phoenix (Turner) after a mission to space goes wrong.

After X-Men: Days of Future Past (2014) erased the events of X-Men: The Last Stand (2006) from the series' timeline, Kinberg expressed interest in a new adaptation of Chris Claremont and John Byrne's "The Dark Phoenix Saga" in a future film that would be more faithful than his previous attempt with The Last Stand, which was not well received. The new adaptation was confirmed as a follow-up to Apocalypse in 2016. Kinberg signed on to make his directorial debut in June 2017, when the majority of the cast was set to return from Apocalypse. Filming began later that month in Montreal, and was completed in October 2017, with reshoots taking place in late 2018.

Dark Phoenix is scheduled to be released in the United States on June 7, 2019.

House (TV series)

House (also called House, M.D.) is an American television medical drama that originally ran on the Fox network for eight seasons, from November 16, 2004 to May 21, 2012. The series' main character is Dr. Gregory House (Hugh Laurie), an unconventional, misanthropic medical genius who, despite his dependence on pain medication, leads a team of diagnosticians at the fictional Princeton–Plainsboro Teaching Hospital (PPTH) in New Jersey. The series' premise originated with Paul Attanasio, while David Shore, who is credited as creator, was primarily responsible for the conception of the title character. The series' executive producers included Shore, Attanasio, Attanasio's business partner Katie Jacobs, and film director Bryan Singer. It was filmed largely in a neighborhood and business district in Los Angeles County's Westside called Century City.

House often clashes with his fellow physicians, including his own diagnostic team, because many of his hypotheses about patients' illnesses are based on subtle or controversial insights. His flouting of hospital rules and procedures frequently leads him into conflict with his boss, hospital administrator and Dean of Medicine Dr. Lisa Cuddy (Lisa Edelstein). House's only true friend is Dr. James Wilson (Robert Sean Leonard), head of the Department of Oncology. During the first three seasons, House's diagnostic team consists of Dr. Robert Chase (Jesse Spencer), Dr. Allison Cameron (Jennifer Morrison), and Dr. Eric Foreman (Omar Epps). At the end of the third season, this team disbands. Rejoined by Foreman, House gradually selects three new team members: Dr. Remy "Thirteen" Hadley (Olivia Wilde), Dr. Chris Taub (Peter Jacobson), and Dr. Lawrence Kutner (Kal Penn). Meanwhile, Chase and Cameron continue to appear in different roles at the hospital. Kutner dies late in season five; early in season six, Cameron departs the hospital, and Chase returns to the diagnostic team. Thirteen takes a leave of absence for most of season seven, and her position is filled by medical student Martha M. Masters (Amber Tamblyn). Cuddy and Masters depart before season eight; Foreman becomes the new Dean of Medicine, while Dr. Jessica Adams (Odette Annable) and Dr. Chi Park (Charlyne Yi) join House's team.

House was among the top ten series in the United States from its second through fourth seasons. Distributed to 66 countries, House was the most-watched television program in the world in 2008. The show received numerous awards, including five Primetime Emmy Awards, two Golden Globe Awards, a Peabody Award, and nine People's Choice Awards. On February 8, 2012, Fox announced that the eighth season, then in progress, would be its last. The series finale aired on May 21, 2012, following an hour-long retrospective.

Jack the Giant Slayer

Jack the Giant Slayer (previously titled Jack the Giant Killer) is a 2013 American fantasy adventure film based on the British fairy tales "Jack the Giant Killer" and "Jack and the Beanstalk". The film is directed by Bryan Singer with a screenplay written by Darren Lemke, Christopher McQuarrie and Dan Studney and stars Nicholas Hoult, Eleanor Tomlinson, Stanley Tucci, Ian McShane, Bill Nighy, and Ewan McGregor. The film tells the story of Jack, a young farmhand who must rescue a princess from a race of giants after inadvertently opening a gateway to their land in the sky.

Development of Jack the Giant Slayer began in 2005, when Lemke first pitched the idea. D. J. Caruso was hired to direct the film in January 2009, but in September of that year, Caruso was replaced by Singer, who hired McQuarrie and Studney to rework the script. The main characters were cast between February and March 2011, and principal photography began in April 2011 in England with locations in Somerset, Gloucestershire and Norfolk. Release of the film was moved back in post-production to allow more time for special effects and marketing.

Jack the Giant Slayer premiered on February 26, 2013 in Hollywood and was released theatrically in the United States on March 1, 2013, receiving mixed reviews from critics.

Legion (TV series)

Legion is an American cable television series created for FX by Noah Hawley, based on the Marvel Comics character David Haller / Legion. It is connected to the X-Men film series, the first television series to be so, and is produced by FX Productions in association with Marvel Television. Hawley serves as showrunner on the series.

Dan Stevens stars as Haller, a mutant diagnosed with schizophrenia at a young age. Rachel Keller, Aubrey Plaza, Bill Irwin, Jeremie Harris, Amber Midthunder, and Jean Smart also star, along with Katie Aselton during the first season, as well as Navid Negahban, Jemaine Clement, and Hamish Linklater for the second season. FX and Marvel Television announced a new collaboration to create a television series based on the X-Men character Legion in October 2015, with Hawley signed on to write and direct the pilot. He wanted to show Haller as an "unreliable narrator", including mixing 1960s design with modern-day elements, and filming the series through the title character's distorted view of reality.

The eight-episode first season of Legion aired from February to March 2017, and received critical acclaim. An eleven-episode second season aired from April to June 2018. The series was renewed for a third season in June 2018. The third season is set to premiere in June 2019, and will serve as the final season of the series.

List of 20th Century Fox films (2000–present)

This is a list of films produced by the Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation beginning in 2000. For earlier releases see List of 20th Century Fox films (1935–99).

Mockingbird Lane

Mockingbird Lane is a 2012 television special developed as a re-imagining of the 1960s CBS sitcom The Munsters. It was developed for NBC by Bryan Fuller. The pilot episode aired on October 26, 2012, as a Halloween special, with the option for a series order. The special was viewed by 5.47 million American viewers and gained a 1.5/5 ratings share for adults aged 18–49.On December 27, 2012, NBC announced that it would not be taking Mockingbird Lane to series.

Superman Returns

Superman Returns is a 2006 American superhero film directed and produced by Bryan Singer. It is based on the DC Comics character Superman and serves as a homage sequel to the motion pictures Superman (1978) and Superman II (1980), while ignoring the events of Superman III (1983) and Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1987), including its spin-off Supergirl (1984). The film stars Brandon Routh as Clark Kent/Superman, Kate Bosworth as Lois Lane, Kevin Spacey as Lex Luthor, with James Marsden, Frank Langella, and Parker Posey. The film tells the story of the title character returning to Earth after a five-year absence. He finds that his love interest Lois Lane has moved on with her life, and that his archenemy Lex Luthor is plotting a scheme that will destroy Superman and America.

After a series of unsuccessful projects to resurrect Superman on screen following the critical failure and box office disappointment of Superman IV: The Quest for Peace, Warner Bros. hired Bryan Singer to direct and develop Superman Returns in July 2004. The majority of principal photography took place at Fox Studios Australia, Sydney, while the visual effects sequences were created by a number of studios, including Sony Pictures Imageworks, Rhythm & Hues, Framestore, Rising Sun Pictures, and The Orphanage; filming ended in November 2005.

Upon release, Superman Returns received generally positive reviews, with critics praising its visual effects, story, musical score, the performances of Routh and Spacey. However, it received criticism focusing on its runtime and lack of action sequences. While it was a box office success, Warner Bros. was disappointed with the worldwide box office return. A sequel was planned for a summer 2009 release, but the project was later canceled. The Superman film series was completely rebooted in 2013 with the film Man of Steel, directed by Zack Snyder and starring Henry Cavill as Superman.

The Gifted (U.S. TV series)

The Gifted is an American science fiction superhero television series created for Fox by Matt Nix, based on Marvel Comics' X-Men properties. It is connected to the X-Men film series, set in an alternate timeline where the X-Men have disappeared. The show is produced by 20th Century Fox Television in association with Marvel Television, with Nix serving as showrunner.

The series stars Stephen Moyer and Amy Acker as ordinary parents who take their family on the run after they discover their children's mutant abilities. Sean Teale, Natalie Alyn Lind, Percy Hynes White, Coby Bell, Jamie Chung, Blair Redford, and Emma Dumont also star in the show, with Skyler Samuels and Grace Byers joining them with the second season. The series received a put pilot commitment at Fox after a previous attempted X-Men television series did not move forward at the network in 2016; The Gifted was ordered to series in May 2017.

The Gifted's first season aired from October 2, 2017, to January 15, 2018, and consisted of 13 episodes. It received mostly positive reviews from critics and "solid" viewership. In January 2018, the series was renewed for a 16-episode second season, which began airing on September 25, 2018.

The Triangle (miniseries)

The Triangle is a three-part US-British-German science fiction miniseries concerning the Bermuda Triangle, which first aired on Sci-Fi Channel in the US December 5–7, 2005. It was written by Dean Devlin, Bryan Singer and Rockne S. O'Bannon, directed by Craig R. Baxley, and produced by special effects experts Volker Engel and Marc Weigert, together with Kelly Van Horn, for Devlin's and Singer's production companies Electric Entertainment and Bad Hat Harry Productions, the BBC, and Engel's and Weigert's production company Uncharted Territory.

The Usual Suspects

The Usual Suspects is a 1995 neo-noir mystery film directed by Bryan Singer and written by Christopher McQuarrie. It stars Stephen Baldwin, Gabriel Byrne, Benicio del Toro, Kevin Pollak, Chazz Palminteri, Pete Postlethwaite, and Kevin Spacey.

The plot follows the interrogation of Roger "Verbal" Kint, a small-time con man, who is one of only two survivors of a massacre and fire on a ship docked at the Port of Los Angeles. Through flashback and narration, Kint tells an interrogator a convoluted story of events that led him and his criminal companions to the boat, and of a mysterious crime lord—known as Keyser Söze—who controlled them. The film was shot on a $6 million budget and began as a title taken from a column in Spy magazine called The Usual Suspects, after one of Claude Rains' most memorable lines in the classic film Casablanca, and Singer thought that it would make a good title for a film.

The film was shown out of competition at the 1995 Cannes Film Festival, and then initially released in a few theaters. It received favorable reviews and was eventually given a wider release. McQuarrie won an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay and Spacey won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance. The Writers Guild of America ranked the film as having the 35th greatest screenplay of all time.

Trick 'r Treat

Trick 'r Treat is a 2007 American anthology horror comedy film written and directed by Michael Dougherty and produced by Bryan Singer. The film stars Dylan Baker, Rochelle Aytes, Anna Paquin and Brian Cox. It relates four Halloween horror stories with a common element in them, Sam; a mysterious child trick-or-treater wearing shabby orange footie pajamas with a burlap sack over his head. The character makes an appearance in each of the stories whenever a character breaks Halloween traditions.

Despite being delayed for two years and having a small number of public screenings, the film received much critical acclaim and has since garnered a strong cult following. In October 2013, the filmmakers announced that a sequel, Trick 'r Treat 2, is in the works. In 2016, Michael Dougherty and Legendary Pictures teamed up with AtmosFX to create a series of digital Halloween decorations that feature Sam. In 2017, a Trick 'r Treat themed "scare zone" was added to the Halloween Horror Nights event, which is held annually at the Universal Orlando Resort.. In 2018 the Universal Orlando Resort included a Trick r Treat Haunted House as one of its attractions. 2018 also featured a Scare zone and Maze at Universal Studios Hollywood.

Valkyrie (film)

Valkyrie is a 2008 historical thriller film set in Nazi Germany during World War II. The film depicts the 20 July plot in 1944 by German army officers to assassinate Adolf Hitler and to use the Operation Valkyrie national emergency plan to take control of the country. Valkyrie was directed by Bryan Singer for the American studio United Artists, and the film stars Tom Cruise as Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg, one of the key plotters. The cast included Kenneth Branagh, Bill Nighy, Eddie Izzard, Terence Stamp, and Tom Wilkinson.

Cruise's casting caused controversy among German politicians and members of the von Stauffenberg family due to the actor's practice of Scientology, which is viewed with suspicion in Germany. Because of this, the filmmakers initially had difficulty setting up filming locations in Germany, but they were later given access to film in locations, including Berlin's historic Bendlerblock. German newspapers and filmmakers supported the film and its intention to spread global awareness of von Stauffenberg's plot.

The film changed release dates several times, from as early as June 27, 2008, to as late as February 14, 2009. The changing calendar and poor response to United Artists' initial marketing campaign drew criticism about the studio's viability. After a positive test screening, Valkyrie's release in North America was ultimately changed to December 25, 2008. United Artists renewed its marketing campaign to reduce its focus on Cruise and to highlight Singer's credentials. The film received mixed reviews in the United States and in Germany, where it opened commercially on January 22, 2009.

X-Men (film)

X-Men is a 2000 American superhero film based on the Marvel Comics superhero team of the same name. Directed by Bryan Singer and written by David Hayter, it features an ensemble cast consisting of Hugh Jackman, Patrick Stewart, Ian McKellen, Halle Berry, Famke Janssen, James Marsden, Bruce Davison, Rebecca Romijn-Stamos, Ray Park, and Anna Paquin. The film depicts a world where a small proportion of people are mutants, whose possession of superhuman powers makes them distrusted by normal humans. It focuses on mutants Wolverine and Rogue as they are brought into a conflict between two groups that have radically different approaches to bringing about the acceptance of mutant-kind: Professor Xavier's X-Men, and the Brotherhood of Mutants, led by Magneto.

Development of X-Men began as far back as 1984 with Orion Pictures, with James Cameron and Kathryn Bigelow in discussions at one point. The film rights were bought by 20th Century Fox in 1994, and various scripts and film treatments were commissioned from Andrew Kevin Walker, John Logan, Joss Whedon, and Michael Chabon. Singer signed to direct in 1996, with further rewrites by Ed Solomon, Singer, Tom DeSanto, Christopher McQuarrie, and Hayter, in which Beast and Nightcrawler were deleted over budget concerns from Fox. X-Men marked the Hollywood debut for Jackman, a last-second choice for Wolverine, cast three weeks into filming. Filming took place from September 22, 1999 to March 3, 2000, primarily in Toronto.

X-Men premiered at Ellis Island on July 12, 2000, and was released in the United States on July 14, 2000. It was a box office success, grossing over $296.3 million worldwide, and received positive reviews from critics, citing its performances, story, and thematic depth. The film's success led to a series of sequels, prequels, and spin-offs, with the overall success of the series spawning a reemergence of superhero films, a genre that would remain highly popular for the next two decades.

X2 (film)

X2 (often promoted as X2: X-Men United and internationally as X-Men 2) is a 2003 American superhero film based on the X-Men superhero team appearing in Marvel Comics. It is the sequel to 2000's X-Men, as well as the second installment in the X-Men film series, and was directed by Bryan Singer and written by Michael Dougherty, Dan Harris, and David Hayter. It features an ensemble cast including Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman, Ian McKellen, Halle Berry, Famke Janssen, James Marsden, Rebecca Romijn-Stamos, Brian Cox, Alan Cumming, Bruce Davison, and Anna Paquin. Its plot, inspired by the graphic novel God Loves, Man Kills, pits the X-Men and their enemies, the Brotherhood, against the genocidal Colonel William Stryker (Brian Cox); he leads an assault on Professor Xavier's school to build his own version of Xavier's mutant-tracking computer Cerebro, in order to destroy every mutant on Earth and to "save" the human race from them.

Development on the sequel began shortly after the first film was released in 2000. David Hayter and Zak Penn wrote separate scripts, combining what they felt to be the best elements of both scripts into one screenplay. Michael Dougherty and Dan Harris were eventually hired to rewrite the work, and changed the characterizations of Beast, Angel, and Lady Deathstrike. Sentinels and the Danger Room were set to appear before being deleted because of budget concerns. The film's premise was influenced by the Marvel Comics storylines Return to Weapon X and God Loves, Man Kills. Filming began in June 2002 and ended that November, mostly taking place at Vancouver Film Studios, the largest North American production facility outside of Los Angeles. Production designer Guy Hendrix Dyas adapted similar designs by John Myhre from the previous film.

X2 was released in the United States on May 2, 2003, and received positive reviews for its storyline, action sequences, and performances. The film grossed over approximately $407 million worldwide, and received eight Saturn Awards nominations.

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