Baby Ray

Buford Garfield "Baby" Ray (September 30, 1914 – January 21, 1986) was an American football player who played eleven seasons in the National Football League for the Green Bay Packers from 1938 to 1948.

Baby Ray
refer to caption
Ray playing for Vanderbilt
No. 44
Position:Tackle
Personal information
Born:September 30, 1914
Una, Tennessee
Died:January 21, 1986 (aged 71)
Nashville, Tennessee
Height:6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)
Weight:249 lb (113 kg)
Career information
High school:Nashville (TN) Central
College:Vanderbilt
Undrafted:1938
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early life

Ray was born in Una, Tennessee, an unincorporated town east of Nashville.[1] He attended Central High School in Nashville.[2]

College career

Ray played for Vanderbilt University for three seasons, 1935-1937. He was a stand-out at both offensive and defensive tackle, due in part to his tremendous size. Ray stood 6' 6" and weighed over 280 pounds, much larger than nearly all college football players of the day.[3] In his final season with the Commodores, Ray was named a co-captain.[4]

Ray also competed in the shot put while at Vanderbilt.[5]

Professional career

Ray was not selected in the 1938 NFL Draft, and became the subject of a free agent bidding war between George Halas of the Chicago Bears and Curly Lambeau of the Packers.[6] Ray signed with Green Bay, playing the entirety of his eleven-year NFL career with the Packers.

Early in his career, Ray shed upwards of 25 pounds from his college playing weight,[6] helping to improve his mobility. Throughout his pro career, Ray typically played at 250-255 pounds.[7]

Ray appeared in the 1940 NFL All-Star Game. He was named to the United Press International All-Pro team four times, once to the First Team (1941) and three times to the Second Team (1939, 1943 and 1944).[1]

Ray was a member of the Packers' 1939 and 1944 NFL championship teams.[3]

Retirement

After retiring as a player, Ray returned to Vanderbilt as an assistant coach under head coach Bill Edwards.[8] He later became the university's first full-time football recruiter[2] and also served as the head of the physical education department.[8] Following his tenure at Vanderbilt, he rejoined the Packers organization as a scout.[3]

In 1969, Ray was named to the National Football League 1940s All-Decade Team by the Pro Football Hall of Fame.[3] He was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1973[4] and into the Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame in 1983.[2]

Ray died of a heart attack in Nashville on January 21, 1986 at the age of 71 following a hunting trip.[8][9]

Personal life

Ray had three children with his wife, Jane Burns Ray. They made their home in Nashville.[8]

References

  1. ^ a b "Baby Ray". Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 2012-12-23.
  2. ^ a b c "Ray, Buford "Baby"". Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2012-12-23.
  3. ^ a b c d "NFL's All-Decade Team of the 1940s". Pro Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2012-12-23.
  4. ^ a b "Buford 'Baby' Ray". Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on 2012-12-09. Retrieved 2012-12-23.
  5. ^ "Vanderbilt Uncovers Future Shot-Putting Champ -- Maybe". Spartanburg Herald-Journal. 1936-04-12. Retrieved 2012-12-27.
  6. ^ a b Gulbrandsen, Don (2007). Green Bay Packers: The Complete Illustrated History. Minneapolis, MN: MBI Publishing. p. 47. ISBN 978-0-7603-3505-5. Retrieved 2012-12-23.
  7. ^ McGlynn, Stoney (1939-08-15). "The Sports Parade". Milwaukee Sentinel. Retrieved 2012-12-27.
  8. ^ a b c d "Packers' Baby Ray dies at 71". Milwaukee Sentinel. 1986-01-22. Retrieved 2012-12-23.
  9. ^ "'Baby' Ray dies". The Vindicator. 1986-01-22. Retrieved 2012-12-27.

External links

1939 Green Bay Packers season

The 1939 Green Bay Packers season was their 21st season overall and their 19th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 9–2 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning a first-place finish in the Western Conference. The Packers ended the season by beating the New York Giants in the NFL Championship Game 27–0, earning the Packers their fifth NFL Championship and the first title game shutout ever recorded.

1942 Green Bay Packers season

The 1942 Green Bay Packers season was their 24th season overall and their 22nd season in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–2–1 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning a second-place finish in the Western Conference.

Aretha in Paris

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Baby (nickname)

Baby is the nickname of:

Rafael Araújo (basketball) (born 1980), Brazilian professional basketball player

Baby Arizmendi (1914–1962), Mexican featherweight world boxing champion

Princess Beatrice of the United Kingdom (1857–1944), youngest daughter of Queen Victoria

Baby Consuelo (born 1952), Brazilian singer, guitarist and composer

Dave "Baby" Cortez (born 1938), American pop and R&B organist and pianist

Baby Dalupan (born 1923), former Philippine Basketball Association coach and player

Baby Dodds (1898–1959), American jazz drummer

Baby Ray (1914–1986), American National Football League player

Baby Tate (1916–1972), American Piedmont blues guitarist

Baby Washington (born 1940), American soul and R&B singer

Baby Ray (band)

Baby Ray is a band from Cambridge, Massachusetts that was formed in the 1996 from members of the band Brain Helicopter. The founding members are Ken Lafler and Erich Groat (also of Willard Grant Conspiracy). Their sound carries a pop sensibility, while still adhering to the alternative style of rock from the 90's. The Boston Phoenix described the band's music as a "clever kind of contortionist pop, with its pretzel-shaped melodies and impishly bratty wordplay".

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Thirsty Ear Recordings is an American independent record label. It was founded in the late 1970s as a marketing company for the then-unnamed alternative music field, and expanded to issue its own records in 1990.

Thirsty Ear came to prominence in the mid-1990s with a series of CD reissues of early industrial albums by artists such as Foetus, Einstürzende Neubauten, Marc Almond, Swans, and Test Dept. The label also released new albums by alternative rock bands such as Baby Ray, Madder Rose, and The Church. Foetus would remain on the label, recording original music on Thirsty Ear through 2001.

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