BMC Medicine

BMC Medicine is a peer-reviewed electronic-only medical journal published since 2003 by BioMed Central which is part of Springer Nature. It is described as "the flagship medical journal of the BMC series. An open access, open peer-reviewed general medical journal, BMC Medicine publishes outstanding and influential research in all areas of clinical practice, translational medicine, medical and health advances, public health, global health, policy, and general topics of interest to the biomedical and sociomedical professional communities".[1]

Like the other journals in the BMC stable, BMC Medicine is an open access journal, funded by article processing fees.

The journal is abstracted and indexed in CAS, BIOSIS, Embase, MEDLINE, PubMed Central, Science Citation Index Expanded and Scopus. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2017 impact factor of 9.088 and is ranked among the top 10 general medical journals (10 out of 155 journals in the Medicine, General and Internal category.) [2]

BMC Medicine
DisciplineMedicine
LanguageEnglish
Publication details
Publication history
2003–present
Publisher
yes
LicenseCC-BY-4.0
9.088
Standard abbreviations
BMC Med.
Indexing
ISSN1741-7015
LCCN2004243044
OCLC no.53806969
Links

References

  1. ^ "BMC Medicine | About". www.biomedcentral.com. Retrieved 2018-03-19.
  2. ^ https://jcr.incites.thomsonreuters.com/
Active immunization

Active immunization is the induction of immunity after exposure to an antigen. Antibodies are created by the recipient and may be stored permanently.

Active immunization can occur naturally when a microbe or other antigen is received by a person who has not yet come into contact with the microbe and has no pre-made antibodies for defense. The immune system will eventually create antibodies for the microbe, but this is a slow process and, if the microbe is deadly, there may not be enough time for the antibodies to be used.

Artificial active immunization is where the microbe is injected into the person before they are able to take it in naturally. The microbe is treated, so that it will not harm the infected person. Depending on the type of disease, this technique also works with dead microbes, parts of the microbe, or treated toxins from the microbe. A common example of this form of active immunization is vaccinations, which have led to several controversies in the past and even present regarding their safety.

Aphrodisiac

An aphrodisiac or love drug is a substance that increases libido when consumed. Aphrodisiacs are distinct from substances that address fertility issues or secondary sexual (dys)function such as erectile dysfunction.

The name comes from the Greek ἀφροδισιακόν, aphrodisiakon, i.e. "sexual, aphrodisiac", from aphrodisios, i.e. "pertaining to Aphrodite", the Greek goddess of love. The opposite substance is an anaphrodisiac.

Basic research

Basic research, also called pure research or fundamental research, has the scientific research aim to improve scientific theories for improved understanding or prediction of natural or other phenomena. Applied research, in turn, uses scientific theories to develop technology or techniques to intervene and alter natural or other phenomena. Though often driven by curiosity, basic research fuels applied science's innovations. The two aims are often coordinated in research and development.

BioMed Central

BioMed Central (BMC) is a United Kingdom-based, for-profit scientific open access publisher. BioMed Central publishes over 250 scientific journals. All BioMed Central journals are only published online. BioMed Central describes itself as the first and largest open access science publisher. It is owned by Springer Nature.

FGI-106

FGI-106 is a broad-spectrum antiviral drug developed as a potential treatment for enveloped RNA viruses, in particular viral hemorrhagic fevers from the bunyavirus, flavivirus and filovirus families. It acts as an inhibitor which blocks viral entry into host cells. In animal tests FGI-106 shows both prophylactic and curative action against a range of deadly viruses for which few existing treatments are available, including the bunyaviruses hantavirus, Rift Valley fever virus and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, the flavivirus dengue virus, and the filoviruses Ebola virus and Marburg virus.

Gluten

Gluten (from Latin gluten, "glue") is a group of proteins, termed prolamins and glutelins, stored with starch in the endosperm of various cereal (grass) grains. It is found in wheat (including related wheat species and hybrids, such as spelt, khorasan, emmer, einkorn, and triticale); barley, rye, and oats as well as products derived from these grains such as breads and malts. Glutens, especially Triticeae glutens, have unique viscoelastic and adhesive properties, which give dough its elasticity, helping it rise and keep its shape and often leaving the final product with a chewy texture. These properties and its relative low cost are the reasons why gluten is so widely demanded by the food industry and for non-food uses.Prolamins in wheat are called gliadins; in barley, hordeins; in rye, secalins; and in oats, avenins. These protein classes are collectively referred to as gluten. Wheat glutelins are called glutenin. True gluten is limited to these four grains. (The storage proteins in maize and rice are sometimes called glutens, but they differ from true gluten.)

Gluten can trigger adverse inflammatory, immunological and autoimmune reactions and is responsible for a broad spectrum of gluten-related disorders, including coeliac disease, non-coeliac gluten sensitivity, dermatitis herpetiformis, gluten ataxia and other neurological disorders. Their treatment is the gluten-free diet.The occurrence of oat avenin toxicity depends on the oat cultivar consumed, because the immunoreactivities of toxic prolamins are different among oat varieties. Also, many oat products are cross-contaminated with other gluten-containing cereals.

Ham

Ham is pork from a leg cut that has been preserved by wet or dry curing, with or without smoking. As a processed meat, the term "ham" includes both whole cuts of meat and ones that have been mechanically formed.

Ham is made around the world, including a number of highly coveted regional specialties, such as Westphalian ham and some varieties of Spanish jamón. In addition, numerous ham products have specific geographical naming protection, such as Prosciutto di Parma and Prosciutto Toscano in Europe, and Smithfield ham in the US.

List of open-access journals

This is a list of open-access journals by field. The list contains notable journals which have a policy of full open access. It does not include delayed open access journals, hybrid open access journals, or related collections or indexing services.

True open-access journals can be split into two categories :

diamond or platinum open-access journals, which charge no additional publication, open access or article processing fees

gold open-access journals, which charge publication fees (also called article processing charges, APCs).The list below is focused on open-access journals with no fees. However, some fields like biology and medicine have a stronger tradition of article processing charge, the corresponding journals below then have a footnote indicating such fees.

Lunch meat

Lunch Meats—also known as cold cuts, luncheon meats, cooked meats, sliced meats, cold meats and deli meats—are precooked or cured meat, often sausages or meat loaves, that are sliced and served cold or hot on sandwiches or on party trays. They can be bought pre-sliced in vacuum packs at a supermarket or grocery store, or they can be purchased at a delicatessen or deli counter, where they might be sliced to order. Unsliced, canned lunch meats are sold under brands such as Spam and Treet.

Lupus nephritis

Lupus nephritis (also known as SLE nephritis) is an inflammation of the kidneys caused by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease. It is a type of glomerulonephritis in which the glomeruli become inflamed. As the result of SLE, the cause of glomerulonephritis is said to be secondary and has a different pattern and outcome from conditions with a primary cause originating in the kidney.

Medical malpractice

Medical malpractice is a legal cause of action that occurs when a medical or health care professional deviates from standards in his or her profession, thereby causing injury to a patient.

National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences

The National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro-Sciences is a premier medical institution located in Bangalore, India. NIMHANS is the apex centre for mental health and neuroscience education in the country, the institute operates autonomously under the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare.

Neurofibroma

A neurofibroma is a benign nerve-sheath tumor in the peripheral nervous system. In 90% of cases, they are found as stand-alone tumors, while the remainder are found in persons with neurofibromatosis type I (NF1), an autosomal-dominant genetically inherited disease, they can result in a range of symptoms from physical disfiguration and pain to cognitive disability. Neurofibromas arise from nonmyelinating-type Schwann cells that exhibit biallelic inactivation of the NF1 gene that codes for the protein neurofibromin. This protein is responsible for regulating the RAS-mediated cell growth signaling pathway. In contrast to schwannomas, another type of tumor arising from Schwann cells, neurofibromas incorporate many additional types of cells and structural elements in addition to Schwann cells, making it difficult to identify and understand all the mechanisms through which they originate and develop.

Nut (fruit)

A nut is a fruit composed of an inedible hard shell and a seed, which is generally edible. In general usage, a wide variety of dried seeds are called nuts, but in a botanical context "nut" implies that the shell does not open to release the seed (indehiscent). The translation of "nut" in certain languages frequently requires paraphrases, as the word is ambiguous.

Most seeds come from fruits that naturally free themselves from the shell, unlike nuts such as hazelnuts, chestnuts, and acorns, which have hard shell walls and originate from a compound ovary. The general and original usage of the term is less restrictive, and many nuts (in the culinary sense), such as almonds, pecans, pistachios, walnuts, and Brazil nuts, are not nuts in a botanical sense. Common usage of the term often refers to any hard-walled, edible kernel as a nut.

Purkinje cell

Purkinje cells, or Purkinje neurons, are a class of GABAergic neurons located in the cerebellum. They are named after their discoverer, Czech anatomist Jan Evangelista Purkyně, who characterized the cells in 1839.

Sertoli cell-only syndrome

Sertoli cell-only syndrome (a.k.a. Del Castillo syndrome and germ cell aplasia ) is a disorder characterized by male sterility without sexual abnormality. It describes a condition of the testes in which only Sertoli cells line the seminiferous tubules.

Testicular sperm extraction

Testicular sperm extraction (TESE) is the process of removing a small portion of tissue from the testicle under local anesthesia and extracting the few viable sperm cells present in that tissue for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). The testicular sperm extraction process is recommended to men who cannot produce sperm by ejaculation due to azoospermia, such as that caused by primary testicular failure, congenital absence of the vas deferens or non-reconstructed vasectomy.Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and testicular sperm extraction (TESE) have reduced the need for donor sperm.

Serum inhibin-B weakly indicates presence of sperm cells in the testes, raising chances for successfully achieving pregnancy through TESE, although the association is not very substantial, having a sensitivity of 0.65 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.56–0.74) and a specificity of 0.83 (CI: 0.64–0.93) for prediction the presence of sperm in the testes in non-obstructive azoospermia.Seminal plasma proteins TEX101 and ECM1 were recently proposed for the differential diagnosis of azoospermia forms and subtypes, and for prediction of TESE outcome.

UK Clinical Aptitude Test

The University Clinical Aptitude Test (UCAT) (formerly UKCAT) is a test used in the selection process by a consortium of UK university Medical and Dental Schools. It is run by the UCAT Consortium, currently chaired by Nigel Siesage, in partnership with Pearson VUE. It was first introduced in 2006.

The test is designed to give information on the candidates' cognitive abilities through four reasoning tests, with a fifth test, the situational judgement test testing attitudes and professional behaviour. The test is used by the majority of UK universities to make more informed choices between medical and dental applicants.

Vector control

Vector control is any method to limit or eradicate the mammals, birds, insects or other arthropods (here collectively called "vectors") which transmit disease pathogens. The most frequent type of vector control is mosquito control using a variety of strategies. Several of the "neglected tropical diseases" are spread by such vectors.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.