BCS National Championship Game

The BCS National Championship Game, or BCS National Championship, was a postseason college football bowl game, used to determine a national champion of the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), first played in the 1998 college football season as one of four designated bowl games, and beginning in the 2006 season as a standalone event rotated among the host sites of the aforementioned bowls.

The game was organized by a group known as the Bowl Championship Series, consisting of the Rose Bowl, Sugar Bowl, Fiesta Bowl, and Orange Bowl, which sought to match the two highest-ranked teams in a championship game to determine the best team in the country at the end of the season. The participating teams were determined by averaging the results of the final weekly Coaches' Poll, the Harris Poll of media, former players and coaches, and the average of six computer rankings. The Coaches' Poll was contractually required to name the winner of the game as its No. 1 team on the final postseason ranking; hence, the AFCA National Championship Trophy was presented to the winning team during a post-game ceremony.

The methodologies of the BCS system and its selections proved to be controversial. Although in most years the winner of the BCS National Championship would also be designated as the national champion by other organizations and polls (such as the Associated Press poll), the 2003 season was a major exception, as the BCS rankings chose the AP's No. 3-ranked team, the University of Oklahoma, over the No. 1-ranked team in that poll, the University of Southern California, to participate in the national title game (the Sugar Bowl) despite Oklahoma's loss to Kansas State University in the 2003 Big 12 Championship Game. That was the only season during the BCS era when the national championship was split, with Louisiana State University winning the BCS national championship and the University of Southern California winning the AP national championship, plus the football writers' national championship.

The BCS National Championship Game was played for the final time in 2014 after the same organizing group established a new system, the College Football Playoff, a four-team single elimination tournament, as the successor to the BCS.

BCS National Championship Game
StadiumFour-year rotation between:
State Farm Stadium
Mercedes-Benz Superdome
Hard Rock Stadium
Rose Bowl
LocationFour-year rotation between:
Glendale, Arizona
New Orleans, Louisiana
Miami Gardens, Florida
Pasadena, California
Previous stadiumsSun Devil Stadium (1999, 2003)
Previous locationsTempe, Arizona (1999, 2003)
Operated1999–2014
PayoutUS$23,900,000 (2014 game[1])
Preceded byBowl Alliance (199597)
Bowl Coalition (199294)
Succeeded byCollege Football Playoff National Championship (2015)
Sponsors
Tostitos (1999, 2003, 2007, 2011), Nokia (2000, 2004), FedEx (2001, 2005, 2009), AT&T (2002), Allstate (2008, 2012), Citi (2006, 2010), Discover (2013), Vizio (2014)
2014 matchup
No. 1 Florida State vs. No. 2 Auburn (Florida State 34–31)
2010 BCS Champ
The view from the 50-yard line for the 2010 BCS National Championship at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California (Alabama vs. Texas)

History

The first BCS Championship Game was played at the conclusion of the 1998 college football season in accordance with an agreement by the Big Ten Conference, the Pac-10 Conference, and the Rose Bowl Game to join the "Bowl Alliance" system. The expanded format was called the Bowl Championship Series.

The Bowl Alliance and its predecessor, the Bowl Coalition, featured championship games in the 1992–1997 seasons. However, these could not always ensure a matchup between the top two ranked teams because of the lack of participation by the Big Ten and Pac-10.

The BCS National Championship Game was initially rotated among the four participating bowl games: the Rose Bowl, Orange Bowl, Fiesta Bowl, and Sugar Bowl. However, beginning with the 2006 season, the BCS National Championship Game was added as a separate contest, played after New Year's Day. The game rotated its location among the Fiesta, Sugar, Orange, and Rose venues.

Game results

  • For Bowl Coalition championship game results from 1992–1994, see: Bowl Coalition
  • For Bowl Alliance championship game results from 1995–1997, see: Bowl Alliance
Season Date Winning Team Score Losing Team Bowl Game Site Attendance[2]
1998 January 4, 1999 1 Tennessee
SEC Champions
23-16 2 Florida State
ACC Co-Champions
1999 Fiesta Bowl Sun Devil Stadium
Tempe, Arizona
80,470
1999 January 4, 2000 1 Florida State
ACC Champions
46-29 2 Virginia Tech
Big East Champions
2000 Sugar Bowl Louisiana Superdome
New Orleans
79,280
2000 January 3, 2001 1 Oklahoma
Big 12 Champions
13-2 2 Florida State
ACC Champions
2001 Orange Bowl Pro Player Stadium
Miami
76,835
2001 January 3, 2002 1 Miami (FL)
Big East Champions
37-14 2 Nebraska
At-large
2002 Rose Bowl Rose Bowl
Pasadena, California
93,781
2002 January 3, 2003 2 Ohio State
Big Ten Co-Champions
31-24
(2OT)
1 Miami (FL)
Big East Champions
2003 Fiesta Bowl Sun Devil Stadium
Tempe, Arizona
77,502
2003 January 4, 2004 2 LSU
SEC Champions
21-14 1 Oklahoma
At-large
2004 Sugar Bowl Louisiana Superdome
New Orleans
79,342
2004 January 4, 2005 1 USC
Pac-10 Champions
55-19 2 Oklahoma
Big 12 Champions
2005 Orange Bowl Pro Player Stadium
Miami Gardens, Florida
77,912
2005 January 4, 2006 2 Texas
Big 12 Champions
41-38 1 USC
Pac-10 Champions
2006 Rose Bowl Rose Bowl Stadium
Pasadena, California
93,986
2006 January 8, 2007 2 Florida
SEC Champions
41-14 1 Ohio State
Big Ten Champions
2007 BCS National Championship Game University of Phoenix Stadium
Glendale, Arizona
74,628
2007 January 7, 2008 2 LSU
SEC Champions
38-24 1 Ohio State
Big Ten Champions
2008 BCS National Championship Game Louisiana Superdome
New Orleans
79,651
2008 January 8, 2009 2 Florida
SEC Champions
24-14 1 Oklahoma
Big 12 Champions
2009 BCS National Championship Game Dolphin Stadium
Miami Gardens, Florida
78,468
2009 January 7, 2010 1 Alabama
SEC Champions
37-21 2 Texas
Big 12 Champions
2010 BCS National Championship Game Rose Bowl
Pasadena, California
94,906
2010 January 10, 2011 1 Auburn
SEC Champions
22-19 2 Oregon
Pac-10 Champions
2011 BCS National Championship Game University of Phoenix Stadium
Glendale, Arizona
78,603
2011 January 9, 2012 2 Alabama
At-large
21-0 1 LSU
SEC Champions
2012 BCS National Championship Game Mercedes-Benz Superdome
New Orleans, Louisiana
78,237
2012 January 7, 2013 2 Alabama
SEC Champions
42-14 1 Notre Dame
Independent
2013 BCS National Championship Game Sun Life Stadium
Miami Gardens, Florida
80,120
2013 January 6, 2014 1 Florida State
ACC Champions
34-31 2 Auburn
SEC Champions
2014 BCS National Championship Game Rose Bowl
Pasadena, California
94,208

† USC vacated its win in the 2005 Orange Bowl.

Records by team

Appearances School Wins Losses Win Pct Title Season(s)
4 Florida State 2 2 .500 1999, 2013
4 Oklahoma 1 3 .250 2000
3 Alabama 3 0 1.000 2009, 2011, 2012
3 LSU 2 1 .667 2003, 2007
3 Ohio State 1 2 .333 2002
2 Florida 2 0 1.000 2006, 2008
2 Auburn 1 1 .500 2010
2 Miami (FL) 1 1 .500 2001
2 Texas 1 1 .500 2005
2 USC 1† 1 .500 2004
1 Tennessee 1 0 1.000 1998
1 Nebraska 0 1 .000 -
1 Notre Dame 0 1 .000 -
1 Oregon 0 1 .000 -
1 Virginia Tech 0 1 .000 -

† USC vacated its win in the 2005 Orange Bowl.

Records by conference

Conference Appearances Wins Losses Win Pct # of Schools School(s)
SEC 11 9** 2** .818 5 Alabama (3-0)
LSU (2-1)
Florida (2-0)
Auburn (1-1)
Tennessee (1-0)
Big 12 7 2 5 .286 3 Oklahoma (1-3)
Texas (1-1)
Nebraska (0-1)
ACC 4 2 2 .500 1 Florida State (2-2)
Big East* 3 1 2 .333 2 Miami (FL) (1-1)
Virginia Tech (0-1)
Big Ten 3 1 2 .333 1 Ohio State (1-2)
Pac-12 3 1† 2 .333 2 USC (1†-1)
Oregon (0-1)
Independent 1 0 1 .000 1 Notre Dame (0-1)

Note: Conference affiliations are contemporaneous with the game, which may differ from the current alignment.

* The American Athletic Conference was known as the Big East during the 1991–2012 seasons. Because of a split between the non-FBS schools and FBS schools, the conference adopted its present name for the 2013 season.

** Alabama defeated fellow SEC member LSU in the 2012 BCS Championship Game, resulting in both a win and loss for the conference.

† USC vacated its win in the 2005 Orange Bowl.

Game records

Team Performance vs. Opponent Year
Most Points 55, USC vs. Oklahoma 2005
Most Points Combined 79, Texas vs. USC 2006
Fewest Points Allowed 0, Alabama vs. LSU 2012
Fewest Points Combined 15, Oklahoma vs. Florida State 2001
First downs 30, Texas vs. USC 2006
Rushing yards 289, Texas (36 att.) vs. USC 2006
Passing yards 374, Oregon vs. Auburn 2011
Total yards 556, Texas (289 rush, 267 pass) vs. USC 2006
Total plays 85, Auburn vs. Oregon 2011
Largest comeback 18, Florida State vs. Auburn 2014
Individual Performance, Team vs. Opponent Year
Total offense 467, Vince Young, Texas (267 pass, 200 rush) vs. USC 2006
Rushing yards 200, Vince Young (QB), Texas (19 att.) vs. USC 2006
Rushing TDs 3, Vince Young (QB), Texas vs. USC 2006
Passing yards 363, Darron Thomas, Oregon vs. Auburn (28-41-2, 2 TD) 2011
Passing TDs 5, Matt Leinart, USC vs. Oklahoma 2005
Receptions 11, Kellen Winslow Jr., Miami vs. Ohio State (122 yards, 1 TD) 2003
Receiving yards (tie) 199, Peerless Price, Tennessee vs. Florida State (4 rec., 1 TD) 1999
Receiving yards (tie) 199, Andre Johnson, Miami vs. Nebraska (7 rec., 2 TD) 2002
Receiving TDs 3, Steve Smith, USC vs. Oklahoma 2005
Field goals 5, Jeremy Shelley, Alabama vs. LSU 2012
Tackles 18, James Laurinaitis, Ohio State vs. LSU 2008
Sacks 3, Derrick Harvey, Florida vs. Ohio State 2007
Interceptions 2, Sean Taylor, Miami vs. Ohio State 2003
Long Plays Performance, Team vs. Opponent Year
Touchdown rush 65, Chris "Beanie" Wells, Ohio State vs. LSU 2008
Touchdown pass 79, Tee Martin to Peerless Price, Tennessee vs. Florida State 1999
Pass 81, Darron Thomas to Jeff Maehl, Oregon vs. Auburn 2011
Kickoff return 100, Levante Whitfield, Florida State vs. Auburn (TD) 2014
Punt return 71, DeJuan Groce, Nebraska vs. Miami (TD) 2002
Interception return 54, Dwayne Goodrich, Tennessee vs. Florida State (TD) 1999
Punt 63, A.J. Trapasso, Ohio State vs. LSU 2008
Field goal 46, David Pino, Texas vs. USC 2006

MVPs

Season Bowl MVP(s) Team Position
1998 1999 Fiesta Bowl Peerless Price Tennessee WR
Dwayne Goodrich Tennessee CB
1999 2000 Sugar Bowl Peter Warrick Florida State WR
2000 2001 Orange Bowl Torrance Marshall Oklahoma LB
2001 2002 Rose Bowl Ken Dorsey Miami (FL) QB
Andre Johnson Miami (FL) WR
2002 2003 Fiesta Bowl Craig Krenzel Ohio State QB
Mike Doss Ohio State S
2003 2004 Sugar Bowl Justin Vincent LSU RB
2004 2005 Orange Bowl Matt Leinart USC QB
2005 2006 Rose Bowl Vince Young Texas QB
Michael Huff Texas S
2006 2007 BCS National Championship Game Chris Leak Florida QB
Derrick Harvey Florida DE
2007 2008 BCS National Championship Game Matt Flynn LSU QB
Ricky Jean-Francois LSU DT
2008 2009 BCS National Championship Game Tim Tebow Florida QB
Carlos Dunlap Florida DE
2009 2010 BCS National Championship Game Mark Ingram Alabama RB
Marcell Dareus Alabama DT
2010 2011 BCS National Championship Game Michael Dyer Auburn RB
Nick Fairley Auburn DT
2011 2012 BCS National Championship Game AJ McCarron Alabama QB
Courtney Upshaw Alabama DE
2012 2013 BCS National Championship Game Eddie Lacy Alabama RB
C.J. Mosley Alabama LB
2013 2014 BCS National Championship Game Jameis Winston Florida State QB
P.J. Williams Florida State DB

Heisman Trophy winners in BCS title games

Season Player School Result Stats Notes
1999 Chris Weinke Florida State L 51-25-2 274, 0 TD; 4-7 rush
2001 Eric Crouch Nebraska L 15-5-1 62, 0 TD; 22-114 rush
2003 Jason White Oklahoma L 37-13-2, 102, 0 TD; 7-(-46) rush
2004 Matt Leinart USC W 35-18-0 332, 5 TD; 2-(-11) rush Win later vacated
2005 Reggie Bush USC L 13-82 1 TD; 6-95, 0 TD rec Heisman later vacated
2006 Troy Smith Ohio State L 14-4-1, 35, 0 TD; 10-(-29) rush
2008 Sam Bradford Oklahoma L 41-26-2, 256, 2 TD; 2-(-18) rush
2009 Mark Ingram Alabama W 22-116, 2 TD
2010 Cam Newton Auburn W 34-20-1, 265, 2 TD; 22-64 rush
2013 Jameis Winston Florida State W 35-20-0, 237, 2 TD; 11-26 rush

Criticisms and controversy

Critics of the BCS National Championship argued against the internal validity of a so-called national championship being awarded to the winner of a single postseason game. Critics lamented that the participants were selected based upon polls, computer rankings, popularity and human biases, and not by on-field competition, as in other major sports and all other levels of college football, which employed tournament-format championships. Often, the BCS system led to controversies in which multiple teams finished the season with identical records, and voters distinguished the worthiness of their participation in the BCS National Championship with no set of formal criteria or standards. The end of the 2010 season was one of the best examples of this. Without any objective criteria for evaluation of the teams, the BCS forced voters to impose their own standards and tiebreakers. Critics noted that the system inherently fostered selection bias, and therefore lacked both internal validity and external validity.[3]

Controversies surrounding teams' inclusion in the BCS National Championship Game were numerous. In 2001, Oregon, ranked second in the AP poll, was bypassed in favor of Nebraska despite Nebraska's 62-36 blowout to Colorado in its final regular season game. In 2003, USC was not included in the championship game, but beat Michigan in the Rose Bowl and ended up No. 1 in the final AP poll. The following season, undefeated Auburn, Boise State, and Utah teams were left out of the national title game (the Orange Bowl). In 2008, the University of Utah was excluded from the BCS championship for a second time despite being the only undefeated FBS team and finished second in the final AP poll behind Florida. In 2009, five schools finished the regular season undefeated: Alabama, Texas, Cincinnati, TCU, and Boise State; however, the BCS formula selected traditional powers Alabama and Texas to participate in the BCS National Championship Game.

In 2010, three teams, Oregon, Auburn, and TCU, all finished the year with undefeated records. While TCU statistically led the other two teams in all three major phases of the game[4] (1st in defense, 14th in offense [5] and 13th in special teams [6]) the teams from the two automatic qualifying conferences, Oregon (Pac-12) and Auburn (SEC), were selected over the Horned Frogs for the 2011 national title game. Many voters cited TCU's membership in the non-automatic qualifying Mountain West Conference, perceived as having weaker teams, as one significant reason for their exclusion, despite TCU's undefeated regular-season records in both 2010 and the previous year.[7] Adding to the controversy were comments made by the president of Ohio State University, Gordon Gee, who said that teams which played "the little sisters of the poor" instead of the "murderer's row" of teams in the automatic qualifier conferences did not deserve any national title game consideration. Gee retracted his statement and apologized after TCU defeated Wisconsin in the 2011 Rose Bowl (the Badgers had convincingly defeated Ohio State during the regular season).

Many critics of the Bowl Championship Series favored a tournament with eight to sixteen teams, similar to those administered by the NCAA for its Football Championship Subdivision (FCS), Division II, and Division III football championships. Others favored adopting the incremental step of adding a single post-bowl championship game between the winners of two BCS games among the top four ranked teams in the BCS standings, a so-called "plus one" option. On June 24, 2009, the BCS presidential oversight committee rejected the Mountain West Conference's proposed eight-team playoff plan.[8]

In 2009, the NCAA ruled that former USC running back Reggie Bush was retroactively ineligible for the 2004 BCS National Championship, the 2005 Orange Bowl vs. Oklahoma, for receiving various illegal benefits. In May 2011, the NCAA rejected all appeals of USC's penalties, which included Bush's ineligibility and a two-year bowl ban. On June 6, 2011, USC became the first school to lose a Bowl Championship Series national title due to NCAA sanctions when the BCS presidential oversight committee stripped the school of its 2004 title. As a result, there is no 2004 BCS champion, although USC retained its 2004 AP national title. Additionally, the BCS also nullified USC's participation in the 2006 Rose Bowl. (See attributions 1 and 2.)

Future

During 2012, the BCS actively considered changes to the format for the 2014 football season, to either to extend the season by one game by establishing a four-school semifinal round or by selecting the participants in the national championship game after the season's bowl games were completed.[9] On June 26, 2012, the BCS presidential oversight committee approved a four-school playoff format, in which the participants are determined by a selection committee. The semifinals are played as existing bowl games on or around New Year's Eve and New Year's Day. The championship game is played approximately a week later at a neutral site selected through a competitive bidding process. [10] The new format, known as the College Football Playoff is to be in effect from the 2014 college football season through the 2025 season.

Media coverage

Television

From 1999 through 2005, ABC broadcast eight BCS National Championship Games pursuant to broadcasting rights negotiated with the BCS and the Rose Bowl, whose rights were offered separately. Beginning with the 2006 season, FOX obtained the BCS package, consisting of the Orange Bowl, Fiesta Bowl, Sugar Bowl, and the BCS National Championship Games hosted by these bowls, with ABC retaining the rights to the Rose Bowl and BCS National Championship Games hosted by the Rose Bowl.

On November 18, 2008, the BCS announced that ESPN had won the television rights to the BCS National Championship Game, as well as the other four BCS bowls, for 2011–2014.[11]

Year Network(s) Bowl Play-by-play announcer Color analyst(s) Sideline reporter(s) Studio host(s) Studio analyst(s) TV Rating[12]
1999 ABC Fiesta Bowl Keith Jackson Bob Griese Lynn Swann John Saunders Todd Blackledge 17.2
2000 ABC Sugar Bowl Brent Musburger Gary Danielson Lynn Swann and Jack Arute John Saunders Terry Bowden 17.5
2001 ABC Orange Bowl Brad Nessler Bob Griese Lynn Swann and Jack Arute John Saunders Terry Bowden 17.8
2002 ABC Rose Bowl Keith Jackson Tim Brant Lynn Swann and Todd Harris John Saunders Terry Bowden 13.9
2003 ABC Fiesta Bowl Keith Jackson Dan Fouts Lynn Swann and Todd Harris John Saunders Terry Bowden 17.2
2004 ABC Sugar Bowl Brent Musburger Gary Danielson Lynn Swann and Jack Arute John Saunders Terry Bowden and Craig James 14.5
2005 ABC Orange Bowl Brad Nessler Bob Griese Lynn Swann and Todd Harris John Saunders Craig James and Aaron Taylor 13.7
2006 ABC Rose Bowl Keith Jackson Dan Fouts Todd Harris and Holly Rowe John Saunders Craig James and Aaron Taylor 21.7
2007 FOX 2007 BCS National Championship Game Thom Brennaman Barry Alvarez and Charles Davis Chris Myers Chris Rose Emmitt Smith, Eddie George and Jimmy Johnson 17.4
2008 FOX 2008 BCS National Championship Game Thom Brennaman Charles Davis Chris Myers Chris Rose Eddie George, Urban Meyer and Jimmy Johnson 17.4
2009 FOX 2009 BCS National Championship Game Thom Brennaman Charles Davis Chris Myers Chris Rose Eddie George, Barry Switzer and Jimmy Johnson 15.8
2010 ABC 2010 BCS National Championship Game Brent Musburger Kirk Herbstreit Lisa Salters and Tom Rinaldi Chris Fowler and Rece Davis Lee Corso, Desmond Howard, Pete Carroll, Lou Holtz and Mark May 17.2
2011 ESPN
ESPN 3D
2011 BCS National Championship Game Brent Musburger Kirk Herbstreit Erin Andrews and Tom Rinaldi Chris Fowler Desmond Howard, Urban Meyer and Nick Saban 16.1
2012 ESPN 2012 BCS National Championship Game Brent Musburger Kirk Herbstreit Erin Andrews and Tom Rinaldi Chris Fowler Lee Corso, Gene Chizik and Chip Kelly 14.0
2013 ESPN 2013 BCS National Championship Game Brent Musburger Kirk Herbstreit Heather Cox and Tom Rinaldi Chris Fowler Urban Meyer and Desmond Howard 17.5
2014 ESPN 2014 BCS National Championship Game Brent Musburger Kirk Herbstreit Heather Cox and Tom Rinaldi Chris Fowler Lee Corso, Nick Saban and Desmond Howard 15.7 [1]

Spanish

As part of ESPN's contract with the BCS, ESPN Deportes provided the first Spanish-language U.S. telecast of the BCS National Championship Game in 2012.

Radio

From 1999 to 2014, the BCS National Championship Game was broadcast on ESPN Radio.

Year Network Play-by-play announcer Color analyst(s) Sideline Reporter
1999 ESPN Radio Ron Franklin Mike Gottfried Adrian Karsten
2000 ESPN Radio Ron Franklin Mike Gottfried Adrian Karsten
2001 ESPN Radio Ron Franklin Mike Gottfried Adrian Karsten
2002 ESPN Radio Ron Franklin Mike Gottfried Adrian Karsten
2003 ESPN Radio Ron Franklin Mike Gottfried Adrian Karsten
2004 ESPN Radio Ron Franklin Mike Gottfried Adrian Karsten
2005 ESPN Radio Ron Franklin Mike Gottfried Erin Andrews
2006 ESPN Radio Ron Franklin Bob Davie Dave Ryan
2007 ESPN Radio Brent Musburger Bob Davie and Todd Blackledge Lisa Salters
2008 ESPN Radio Brent Musburger Kirk Herbstreit Lisa Salters
2009 ESPN Radio Brent Musburger Kirk Herbstreit Lisa Salters
2010 ESPN Radio Mike Tirico Jon Gruden and Todd Blackledge Wendi Nix
2011 ESPN Radio Mike Tirico Jon Gruden Joe Schad
2012 ESPN Radio Mike Tirico Todd Blackledge Holly Rowe
2013 ESPN Radio Mike Tirico Todd Blackledge Holly Rowe and Joe Schad
2014 ESPN Radio Mike Tirico Todd Blackledge Holly Rowe and Joe Schad

Related national championship selections

During the BCS era, there was no NCAA Division I FBS playoff, and the BCS National Championship Game was just one of several national championship selection processes in existence.

The American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) participated in a weekly Coaches' Poll published by USA Today; for its final poll of the season, the AFCA was contractually bound to select the BCS National Champion as its No. 1 team.[13] Thus, the winner of the game was awarded the AFCA National Championship Trophy in a postgame ceremony.

The BCS National Champion was also automatically awarded the National Football Foundation's MacArthur Bowl.[14]

The Associated Press and the Football Writers Association of America were independent of the BCS system; their national championship trophies could have been awarded to a school other than the BCS National Championship Game winner.

References

  1. ^ College Football Bowl Schedule. Collegefootballpoll.com. Retrieved on 2014-05-24.
  2. ^ fs.ncaa.org (PDF) http://fs.ncaa.org/Docs/stats/football_records/2015/bowls.pdf. Retrieved December 21, 2018. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  3. ^ Pat Forde (May 20, 2008). "Eight-team playoff would be ideal for college football". ESPN. Retrieved November 21, 2010.
  4. ^ Innovative Statistics, Intelligent Analysis | 2010 FEI RATINGS, SPECIAL TEAMS. Football Outsiders. Retrieved on 2014-05-24.
  5. ^ FEI Offensive Rankings By Team, FBS, 2010 http://www.footballoutsiders.com/stats/feist2010
  6. ^ FEI Special Teams Rankings By Team, FBS, 2010 http://www.footballoutsiders.com/stats/feist2010
  7. ^ TCU lost the highly controversial 2010 Fiesta Bowl to Boise State, in which two non-AQ teams were paired against each other to avoid the possibility of two AQ teams losing to "BCS Busters"
  8. ^ College football: BCS presidents reject playoff plan, Los Angeles Times, June 25, 2009
  9. ^ BCS Playoff TV Deal Worth At Least $3 Billion. Forbes (2012-05-29). Retrieved on 2014-05-24.
  10. ^ BCS presidents approve four-team major college playoff –. Usatoday.com (2012-06-27). Retrieved on 2014-05-24.
  11. ^ ESPN, BCS agree to four-year deal for television, radio, digital rights
  12. ^ bcsfootball.org – TV Ratings Archived October 30, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  13. ^ O'Toole, Thomas. (January 14, 2009) Role of coaches' poll in BCS under review. Usatoday.Com. Retrieved on 2010-11-21.
  14. ^ "MacArthur Bowl". National Football Foundation.

External links

1998 Orange Bowl

The 1998 Orange Bowl was played on January 2, 1998, and served as the Bowl Alliance's designated national championship game for the 1997 season. This 64th edition of the Orange Bowl featured the Nebraska Cornhuskers of the Big 12 Conference and the Tennessee Volunteers of the Southeastern Conference (SEC).

1999 Fiesta Bowl

The 1999 Fiesta Bowl, the designated BCS National Championship Game for the 1998 season, was played on January 4, 1999, in Tempe, Arizona at Sun Devil Stadium. The teams were the Tennessee Volunteers and Florida State Seminoles. Tennessee entered the contest undefeated and number one in the major polls. Florida State sophomore QB Chris Weinke was injured in Florida State's final ACC game of the regular season and did not participate in the championship game. Ultimately, Tennessee won their sixth National Championship after a gap of forty-seven years by beating the Seminoles by a score of 23–16. The game was the first BCS National Championship.

2001 Orange Bowl

The 2001 FedEx Orange Bowl game was a post-season college football bowl game and BCS National Championship match between the University of Oklahoma Sooners and the Florida State Seminoles on January 3, 2001, at Pro Player Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida. Oklahoma defeated FSU 13–2 in a defensive battle to claim the National Championship as head coach Bob Stoops completed just his second season as the coach of the Sooners. The game was part of the 2000–2001 Bowl Championship Series (BCS) of the 2000 NCAA Division I-A football season and represented the concluding game of the season for both teams. The Orange Bowl was first played in 1935, and the 2001 game represented the 67th edition. The contest was televised in the United States on ABC.

2002 Rose Bowl

The 2002 Rose Bowl, played on January 3, 2002, was a college football bowl game. It was the 88th Rose Bowl game and was the BCS National Championship Game of the 2001 college football season. The game featured the Miami Hurricanes and the Nebraska Cornhuskers, marking the first time since the 1919 Rose Bowl, and only the third time in the game's history, that neither the Big Ten nor the Pac-10 Conferences had a representative in this game. The Hurricanes won the game, 37–14, for their fifth national title. Miami quarterback Ken Dorsey and wide receiver Andre Johnson were named the Rose Bowl Players of the Game.

2003 Fiesta Bowl

The 2003 Tostitos Fiesta Bowl took place on January 3, 2003, in Tempe, Arizona, at Sun Devil Stadium. The Ohio State Buckeyes defeated the Miami Hurricanes by a score of 31–24 in double overtime. It also served as the BCS National Championship Game for the 2002 NCAA Division I-A football season. The game was the second overtime result in either the Bowl Championship Series, or its predecessors, the Bowl Alliance or the Bowl Coalition, the first being the January 1, 2000 Orange Bowl between Alabama and Michigan.

2004 Sugar Bowl

The 2004 Nokia Sugar Bowl, the BCS National Championship Game for the 2003 college football season, was played on January 4, 2004 at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. The teams were the LSU Tigers and the Oklahoma Sooners. The Tigers won the BCS National Championship, their second national championship in school history, defeating the Sooners by a score of 21–14.

2005 Orange Bowl

The 2005 Orange Bowl was the BCS National Championship Game of the 2004 NCAA Division I-A football season and was played on January 4, 2005 at Pro Player Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida. The game matched the USC Trojans against the Oklahoma Sooners. Both teams entered with undefeated, 12–0 records. Despite only being 1 point favorites, USC defeated Oklahoma by a score of 55–19, led by quarterback Matt Leinart. ESPN named Leinart's performance as one of the top-10 performances in the first ten years of the BCS system.The game featured many firsts regarding the Heisman Trophy: Leinart had won the 2004 Heisman award the month prior to the game, and Oklahoma quarterback Jason White had won the award the previous season, making it the first game to have two past-Heisman winners on the same field (and on opposite teams). The game featured four of the five Heisman finalists that year: Leinart (winner), Oklahoma running back Adrian Peterson (first runner-up), White (second runner-up) and USC running back Reggie Bush (fourth runner-up); Bush would win the award the following season (although USC returned its copy of Bush's trophy and Bush forfeited the award following the institution of NCAA sanctions in 2010).

On June 10, 2010, USC was forced to vacate all games from December 2004 to the end of the 2005 season among other sanctions as the result of an NCAA investigation into the school's football and men's basketball programs. NCAA investigators released a report stating that a USC player, Reggie Bush, was ineligible beginning in December 2004. The NCAA ordered USC to vacate every win in which Bush appeared, including the 2005 Orange Bowl. The 2005 Orange Bowl is the only BCS National Championship Game ever to be vacated by the winning team. However, USC did retain the Associated Press (AP) national title.

2006 Rose Bowl

The 2006 Rose Bowl Game, played on January 4, 2006 at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California, was an American college football bowl game that served as the BCS National Championship Game for the 2005 College Football season. It featured the only two unbeaten teams of the 2005 NCAA Division I-A football season: the defending Rose Bowl champion and reigning Big 12 Conference champion Texas Longhorns played Pacific-10 Conference titleholders and two-time defending AP national champions, the USC Trojans.

The game was a back-and-forth contest; Texas's victory was not secured until the game's final nineteen seconds. Vince Young, the Texas quarterback, and Michael Huff, a Texas safety, were named the offensive and defensive Rose Bowl Players Of The Game. ESPN named Young's fourth-down, game-winning touchdown run the fifth-highest rated play in college football history. The game is the highest-rated BCS game in TV history with 21.7% of households watching it, and is often considered the greatest college football national championship game of all time. Texas's Rose Bowl win was the 800th victory in school history and the Longhorns ended the season ranked third in Division I history in both wins and winning percentage (.7143). It was only the third time that the two top-ranked teams had faced each other in Rose Bowl history, with the 1963 Rose Bowl and 1969 Rose Bowl games being the others.

The 92nd-annual Rose Bowl Game was played, as it is every year, at the Rose Bowl Stadium in Pasadena, California, in the United States.

This was the final game ever called by longtime broadcaster Keith Jackson (as well as the final Rose Bowl to telecast under ABC Sports branding); the 2007 Rose Bowl would be an ESPN on ABC presentation.

This was the first college football game to feature two Heisman Trophy winners in the same starting lineup. USC's quarterback Matt Leinart and running back Reggie Bush won the award in 2004 and 2005, respectively, although Bush would later forfeit the award.

2007 BCS National Championship Game

The 2007 Tostitos BCS National Championship Game was an American football game played at the University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Arizona, on January 8, 2007. It was the first time that the BCS had staged its own standalone national title game (previously the four BCS bowls each took turns serving as the title game). The #1 Ohio State Buckeyes lost to the #2 Florida Gators, 41–14.

The Buckeyes secured a spot by finishing the regular season undefeated and ranked #1 in the BCS. It was the first time the Buckeyes and Gators had ever met on the football field. The 12–1 Florida Gators earned a spot after defeating Arkansas in the SEC Championship Game in early December, and jumping from #4 to #2 in the final BCS Rankings, passing #3 Michigan and previous #2 USC.

The game was the first BCS National Championship Game to be televised on the Fox TV network.

2008 BCS National Championship Game

The 2008 Allstate BCS National Championship Game was played at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana, on Monday, January 7, 2008, and featured the No. 1 and No. 2 college football teams in the United States as determined by the BCS Poll (a combination of polls and computer formulas) to decide the BCS National Championship for the 2007 NCAA Division I FBS football season.

The game featured No. 1 Big Ten champion Ohio State Buckeyes hosting No. 2 SEC champion LSU Tigers. It also featured the second postseason matchup between head coaches Jim Tressel and Les Miles in five years. The first occurrence was the 2004 Alamo Bowl, when Tressel's Buckeyes defeated Miles' Oklahoma State Cowboys, 33–7.

2009 BCS National Championship Game

The 2009 FedEx BCS National Championship Game was an American football game played at Dolphin Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida, on January 8, 2009. It was the national championship game for the 2008 NCAA Division I FBS football season, and featured the second-ranked Florida Gators against the top-ranked Oklahoma Sooners. The two participants were determined by the BCS Rankings to decide the BCS National Championship. Television coverage in the United States was provided by Fox, and radio coverage by ESPN Radio. The game was the last BCS Championship to air on Fox; starting with the 2010 game, ABC or ESPN televised the championship.

Tim Tebow's two touchdown passes and Percy Harvin's two-yard touchdown run led the Florida Gators to their second BCS National Championship in three seasons. The Gators defeated the Oklahoma Sooners, 24–14, in front of a Dolphin Stadium record crowd of 78,468.

2010 BCS National Championship Game

The 2010 Citi BCS National Championship Game was the finale of the 2009 NCAA Division I FBS football season, and was played between the Texas Longhorns and the Alabama Crimson Tide. It was hosted by the Pasadena Tournament of Roses Association at the Rose Bowl Stadium in Pasadena, California, January 7, 2010. It was the 12th BCS National Championship Game, and the second consecutive year the champion of the Southeastern Conference (SEC) was matched against the champion of the Big 12 Conference.

The game was the ninth meeting of Texas and Alabama, though the first since the 1982 Cotton Bowl Classic. Prior to the game, Texas led the all-time series with a 7–0–1 record, with the first meeting in 1902.The match-up was the third game in which the Tournament of Roses hosted the BCS National Championship game in Pasadena, and the fifth time, overall, that it has hosted a No. 1 versus No. 2 match-up. However, this was the first time the Tournament of Roses hosted the game as a separate event from the Rose Bowl Game. They had previously hosted BCS Championship games in the 2006 and 2002 Rose Bowls, and pre-BCS No. 1 versus No. 2 match-ups in the 1969 and 1963 Rose Bowls.

ABC televised the game, as well as the Rose Bowl; Fox televised the remainder of the BCS. The match-up was the final BCS game to air on broadcast television, with cable network ESPN taking over all Bowl Championship Series telecasts starting in 2011. Following the game in June, Citi decided to end the sponsorship of any future Rose Bowl games, including the National Championship game.

2011 BCS National Championship Game

The 2011 Tostitos BCS National Championship Game was the final college football game to determine the national champion of the 2010 NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) season. The finale of the 2010-2011 Bowl Championship Series was played at the University of Phoenix Stadium, the host facility of the Fiesta Bowl in Glendale, Arizona on January 10, 2011 (8:30 p.m. ET).

The Auburn Tigers from the Southeastern Conference faced the Oregon Ducks of the Pacific-10 Conference for the national championship. A 19-yard field goal by Wes Byrum, as time expired, won the game for the Tigers, with the final score 22-19.

The game was the first BCS National Championship Game not televised on network television, instead being aired on ESPN and simulcast on ESPN3, and recorded a 16.1 rating, the highest overnight rating on record for a cable television program, topping the previous high of 14.4, set by Patriots/Saints on ESPN in 2009. This marked the second time that the national championship under the BCS system was played in Arizona. It was also the first time that the BCS National Championship was streamed to a video game console, specifically the Xbox 360.

2012 BCS National Championship Game

The 2012 Allstate BCS National Championship Game was a postseason college football bowl game between the Alabama Crimson Tide and the LSU Tigers, and determined the national champion of the 2011 NCAA Division I FBS football season on Monday, January 9, 2012, at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. The game was part of the 2011–2012 Bowl Championship Series and a rematch of regular season foes.

Alabama beat LSU 21–0 to win their 14th national championship, marking the first shutout in a national championship game since the 1992 Orange Bowl and the first ever shutout in a BCS bowl game.

The game had the third-lowest TV rating, 14.01, in the 14-year history of the BCS National Championship game.It was LSU's first loss in a game played in New Orleans (which has a close proximity to the LSU campus in Baton Rouge) since the 1987 Sugar Bowl. From 1987 through the 2011 regular season, LSU was 4-0 in bowl games in New Orleans (three Sugar Bowls and the 2008 BCS National Championship Game) and 5-0 in the city vs. Tulane.

2012 Gator Bowl

The 2012 TaxSlayer.com Gator Bowl, the 67th edition of the game, was a post-season American college football bowl game, held on January 2, 2012 at EverBank Field in Jacksonville, Florida as part of the 2011–12 NCAA Bowl season. TaxSlayer.com was named the corporate title sponsor on September 1, 2011. The game, which was telecasted at 1:00 p.m. ET on ESPN2, featured the Ohio State Buckeyes of the Big Ten Conference versus the Florida Gators of the Southeastern Conference.The game was a rematch of the 2007 BCS National Championship Game, where Florida emerged victorious. Florida's head coach for the 2007 game, Urban Meyer, was named head coach at Ohio State in November 2011 and took over the Buckeye football program in the 2012 season. As such, this game is sometimes referred to as the Urban Meyer Bowl.

2013 BCS National Championship Game

The 2013 Discover BCS National Championship Game was a postseason college football bowl game that took place on Monday, January 7, 2013, at Sun Life Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida. It featured the No. 1 ranked Notre Dame Fighting Irish and No. 2 Alabama Crimson Tide. The Alabama Crimson Tide defeated the Notre Dame Fighting Irish 42–14 for the national championship and took home the Championship Trophy.

Alabama was the defending champion and represented the Southeastern Conference, which had participated in and emerged victorious from every standalone BCS Championship Game (since the format was introduced in the 2006–2007 season). Notre Dame did not belong to a conference and was the first independent team to play in the National Championship game since the start of the BCS.

The National Championship game between Alabama and Notre Dame was anticipated as an historical matchup with a rich tradition in college football. Going into the holiday season after Alabama was assured a spot in the National Championship after beating Georgia in the SEC Championship, sportscasters from both sides weighed in on who was most likely to win. Despite the historical record of, at the time, 5-1 in favor of Notre Dame many sports betting centers had Alabama as a heavy favorite with point spreads favoring Alabama as high as ten points over Notre Dame. Many prominent sports writers predicted Notre Dame to win based on several factors including strong overall defense, an inconsistent Alabama team (often cited as being "exposed" against LSU and Texas A&M), and various intangibles such as destiny and generalized fatigue from the dominant performances of the Southeastern Conference.In the aftermath of an Alabama 42 to 14 victory (with the score being 35 to 0 at one point in the game), the BCS National Championship game was considered by Sports Illustrated's Michael Rosenberg to have failed to live up to its hype despite dominating television ratings. Mark Schlabach of ESPN expressed the wish that a playoff system had been in place wherein Oregon or Florida would have played against Alabama. Tom Coyne of Associated Press concluded that Alabama was more talented and physical with better preparation and execution of its game plan than Notre Dame. Specifically, inconsistent tackling, blown coverages, and porous defense were cited by Aaron Ellis of Forbes.com as major detriments to Notre Dame's efforts.With the win, Alabama won their second straight BCS championship, their third championship in four years, and their ninth AP championship overall.

2014 BCS National Championship Game

The 2014 Vizio BCS National Championship Game was the national championship game of the 2013 college football season, which took place on Monday, January 6, 2014. The game featured the Auburn Tigers and Florida State Seminoles. It was the 16th and last time the top two teams would automatically play for the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) title before the implementation of a four-team College Football Playoff system. The game was played at the Rose Bowl Stadium in Pasadena, California, kicking off at 8:30 p.m. ET. The game was hosted by the Pasadena Tournament of Roses, the organizer of the annual Tournament of Roses Parade and the Rose Bowl Game on New Year's Day. The winner of the game, Florida State, was presented with the American Football Coaches Association's "The Coaches' Trophy", valued at $30,000. Pre-game festivities began at 4:30 p.m. PT. Face values of tickets were $385 and $325 (end zone seats) with both teams receiving a total of 40,000 tickets.

Starting immediately after the 2014 Rose Bowl Game, a fresh field was placed on top of the existing field. The field was laid on Thursday, and painting of the field began Friday. The field was completed Saturday in time for it to rest on Sunday for the game on Monday.Florida State scored first on a 35-yard field goal to take an early 3–0 lead. Auburn responded with a touchdown in the first quarter and two in the second to storm out to a 21–3 lead. After a successful punt fake, the Seminoles managed a touchdown late in the second quarter, making it a 21–10 game in Auburn's favor going into halftime. Both teams dominated on defense in the third quarter with the Seminoles hitting a field goal to cut Auburn's lead to eight. In the fourth quarter, Florida State scored a touchdown early to make it a one-point game. Auburn extended its lead to 24–20 on a field goal, but Florida State took the lead 27–24 when Levonte Whitfield took the ensuing kickoff 100 yards for a touchdown. Auburn then retook the lead 31–27 with 1:19 remaining in the game, but Florida State was able to respond, winning the game 34–31 with a Kelvin Benjamin touchdown with 13 seconds left on the clock.For their performances in the game, quarterback Jameis Winston and defensive back P. J. Williams were named the game's most valuable players.

2015 College Football Playoff National Championship

The 2015 College Football Playoff National Championship was a bowl game that determined a national champion of NCAA Division I FBS college football for the 2014 season, which took place at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas on January 12, 2015. It was the culminating game of the 2014–15 bowl season as the inaugural College Football Playoff National Championship, replacing the BCS National Championship Game. The national title was contested through a four-team bracket system, the College Football Playoff, which replaced the previous Bowl Championship Series.The game was played between the winners of two designated semi-final bowl games played on January 1, 2015: the No. 4 Ohio State Buckeyes, who upset No. 1 Alabama 42–35 in the 2015 Sugar Bowl, and the No. 2 Oregon Ducks, who defeated previously unbeaten No. 3 Florida State 59–20 in the 2015 Rose Bowl. This was the first championship game since 2006 that did not feature at least one SEC team, and the teams' first meeting since the 2010 Rose Bowl, which the Buckeyes won 26–17.

The Ohio State Buckeyes won the game, 42–20, marking the first national championship awarded under the CFP system. Following the game, the AP Poll and Coaches' Poll also named Ohio State as their top team of the season, marking Ohio State's first national championship since 2002 and their 8th overall.

Bowl Championship Series

The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) was a selection system that created five bowl game match-ups involving ten of the top ranked teams in the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of American college football, including an opportunity for the top two teams to compete in the BCS National Championship Game. The system was in place for the 1998 through 2013 seasons and in 2014 was replaced by the College Football Playoff.

The BCS relied on a combination of polls and computer selection methods to determine relative team rankings, and to narrow the field to two teams to play in the BCS National Championship Game held after the other college bowl games (the game rotated among four existing bowl games from the 1998 to 2005 season, and was a separate game from the 2006 to 2013 seasons). The American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) was contractually bound to vote the winner of this game as the BCS National Champion and the contract signed by each conference required them to recognize the winner of the BCS National Championship game as the official and only champion. The BCS was created to end split championships and for the champion to win the title on the field between the two teams selected by the BCS.

The system also selected match-ups for four other prestigious BCS bowl games: the Rose Bowl Game, Fiesta Bowl, Sugar Bowl and Orange Bowl. The ten teams selected included the conference champion from each of the six Automatic Qualifying conferences plus four others (two others prior to the 2006 season). The BCS was created by formal agreement by those six conferences (the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC), Big East [now the American Athletic Conference (The American)], Big Ten Conference (Big Ten), Big 12 Conference (Big 12), Pac-10 [now the Pac-12 Conference (Pac-12)], and Southeastern Conference (SEC) conferences) and the three FBS independent schools, and evolved to allow other conferences to participate to a lesser degree. For the 1998 through 2005 seasons eight teams competed in four BCS bowls.

It had been in place since the 1998 season. The BCS replaced the Bowl Alliance, in place from 1995 to 1997, which had followed the Bowl Coalition, in place from 1992 to 1994. Prior to the Bowl Coalition's creation in 1992, the AP Poll's number one and two teams had met in a bowl game only eight times in 56 seasons. The AP's top two teams met 13 out of the 16 seasons when the BCS was in place.

In the 2014 season, the BCS was discontinued and replaced by the College Football Playoff, which organizes a four-team playoff and national championship game.

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