BAFTA Award for Outstanding British Film

The BAFTA Award for Outstanding British Film is given annually by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts presented at the British Academy Film Awards. The award was first given at the 1st British Academy Film Awards, first recognising the films of 1947, and lasted until 1968. For over two decades a specific category for British cinema did not exist, until it was revived at the 46th British Academy Film Awards, recognising the films of 1992. It was previously known as the Alexander Korda Award for Best British Film; while still given in honour of Korda, the award is now called "Outstanding British Film".

To be eligible for nomination as Outstanding British Film, a film "must have significant creative involvement by individuals who are British", including those who have been permanently resident in the UK for ten years or more. The candidates for nomination are the film's director(s), writer(s), and up to three producers; if none of these are British, the film will only be eligible in exceptional circumstances.[1]

In the following lists, the titles and names in bold with a dark grey background are the winners and recipients respectively; those not in bold are the nominees. The years given are those in which the films under consideration were released, not the year of the ceremony, which always takes place the following year.

BAFTA Award for Outstanding British Film
Awarded forExcellence in British cinema
LocationUnited Kingdom
Presented byBritish Academy of Film and Television Arts
First awarded1948
Currently held byThe Favourite (2018)
Websitehttp://www.bafta.org/

1947–1967

1940s

Film Director(s) Producer(s)
1947
(1st)
Odd Man Out Carol Reed Carol Reed
1948
(2nd)
The Fallen Idol Carol Reed Carol Reed
Hamlet Laurence Olivier Laurence Olivier
Oliver Twist David Lean Ronald Neame
Once a Jolly Swagman Jack Lee Ian Dalrymple
The Red Shoes Michael Powell
Emeric Pressburger
Michael Powell
Emeric Pressburger
Scott of the Antarctic Charles Frend Michael Balcon
The Small Voice Fergus McDonell Anthony Havelock-Allan
1949
(3rd)
The Third Man Carol Reed Carol Reed
Kind Hearts and Coronets Robert Hamer Michael Balcon
Passport to Pimlico Henry Cornelius Michael Balcon
The Queen of Spades Thorold Dickinson Anatole de Grunwald
A Run for Your Money Charles Frend Michael Balcon
The Small Back Room Michael Powell
Emeric Pressburger
Michael Powell
Emeric Pressburger
Whisky Galore! Alexander Mackendrick Michael Balcon

1950s

Film Director(s) Producer(s)
1950
(4th)
The Blue Lamp Basil Dearden Michael Balcon
Chance of a Lifetime Bernard Miles Bernard Miles
Morning Departure Roy Ward Baker Jay Lewis
Seven Days to Noon John Boulting
Roy Boulting
John Boulting
Roy Boulting
State Secret Sidney Gilliat Sidney Gilliat
Frank Launder
The Wooden Horse Jack Lee Ian Dalrymple
1951
(5th)
The Lavender Hill Mob Charles Crichton Michael Balcon
The Browning Version Anthony Asquith Teddy Baird
The Magic Box John Boulting Ronald Neame
The Magic Garden Donald Swanson Donald Swanson
The Man in the White Suit Alexander Mackendrick Michael Balcon
No Resting Place Paul Rotha Colin Lesslie
The Small Miracle Maurice Cloche
Ralph Smart
Anthony Havelock-Allan
White Corridors Pat Jackson John Croydon
Joseph Janni
1952
(6th)
The Sound Barrier David Lean David Lean
Angels One Five George More O'Ferrall John W. Gossage
Derek N. Twist
Cry, the Beloved Country Zoltán Korda Zoltán Korda
Alan Paton
Mandy Alexander Mackendrick
Fred F. Sears
Michael Balcon
Leslie Norman
Outcast of the Islands Carol Reed Carol Reed
The River Jean Renoir Kenneth McEldowney
Jean Renoir
1953
(7th)
Genevieve Henry Cornelius Henry Cornelius
The Cruel Sea Charles Frend Leslie Norman
The Heart of the Matter George More O'Ferrall Ian Dalrymple
The Kidnappers Philip Leacock Sergei Nolbandov
Leslie Parkyn
Moulin Rouge John Huston John and James Woolf
1954
(8th)
Hobson's Choice David Lean David Lean
Carrington V.C. Anthony Asquith Teddy Baird
The Divided Heart Charles Crichton Michael Truman
Doctor in the House Ralph Thomas Betty E. Box
For Better, for Worse J. Lee Thompson Kenneth Harper
The Maggie Alexander Mackendrick Michael Truman
The Purple Plain Robert Parrish John Bryan
Romeo and Juliet Renato Castellani Sandro Ghenzi
Joseph Janni
1955
(9th)
Richard III Laurence Olivier Laurence Olivier
The Colditz Story Guy Hamilton Ivan Foxwell
The Dam Busters Michael Anderson Robert Clark
W. A. Whittaker
The Ladykillers Alexander Mackendrick Seth Holt
Michael Balcon
The Night My Number Came Up Leslie Norman Michael Balcon
The Prisoner Peter Glenville Vivian Cox
Simba Brian Desmond Hurst Peter De Sarigny
1956
(10th)
Reach for the Sky Lewis Gilbert Daniel M. Angel
The Battle of the River Plate Michael Powell
Emeric Pressburger
Michael Powell
Emeric Pressburger
The Man Who Never Was Ronald Neame André Hakim
A Town Like Alice Jack Lee Joseph Janni
Yield to the Night J. Lee Thompson Kenneth Harper
1957
(11th)
The Bridge on the River Kwai David Lean Sam Spiegel
The Prince and the Showgirl Laurence Olivier Laurence Olivier
The Shiralee Leslie Norman Michael Balcon
Jack Rix
Windom's Way Ronald Neame John Bryan
1958
(12th)
Room at the Top Jack Clayton James Woolf
John Woolf
Ice Cold in Alex J. Lee Thompson W. A. Whittaker
Indiscreet Stanley Donen Stanley Donen
Orders to Kill Anthony Asquith Anthony Havelock-Allan
Sea of Sand Guy Green Robert S. Baker
Monty Berman
1959
(13th)
Sapphire Basil Dearden Michael Relph
Look Back in Anger Tony Richardson Harry Saltzman
North West Frontier J. Lee Thompson Marcel Hellman
Tiger Bay J. Lee Thompson John Hawkesworth
Leslie Parkyn
Julian Wintle
Yesterday's Enemy Val Guest Michael Carreras

1960s

Film Director(s) Producer(s)
1960
(14th)
Saturday Night and Sunday Morning Karel Reisz Tony Richardson
The Angry Silence Guy Green Richard Attenborough
Bryan Forbes
The Trials of Oscar Wilde Ken Hughes Irving Allen
Albert R. Broccoli
Harold Huth
Tunes of Glory Ronald Neame Colin Lesslie
1961
(15th)
A Taste of Honey Tony Richardson Tony Richardson
The Innocents Jack Clayton Jack Clayton
The Long and the Short and the Tall Leslie Norman Michael Balcon
The Sundowners Fred Zinnemann Gerry Blattner
Whistle Down the Wind Bryan Forbes Richard Attenborough
1962
(16th)
Lawrence of Arabia David Lean Sam Spiegel
Billy Budd Peter Ustinov Peter Ustinov
A Kind of Loving John Schlesinger Joseph Janni
The L-Shaped Room Bryan Forbes Richard Attenborough
James Woolf
Only Two Can Play Sidney Gilliat Leslie Gilliat
1963
(17th)
Tom Jones Tony Richardson Tony Richardson
Billy Liar John Schlesinger Joseph Janni
The Servant Joseph Losey Joseph Losey
Norman Priggen
This Sporting Life Lindsay Anderson Karel Reisz
1964
(18th)
Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb Stanley Kubrick Stanley Kubrick
Becket Peter Glenville Hal B. Wallis
The Pumpkin Eater Jack Clayton James Woolf
The Train John Frankenheimer Jules Bricken
1965
(19th)
The IPCRESS File Sidney J. Furie Harry Saltzman
Darling John Schlesinger Joseph Janni
The Hill Sidney Lumet Kenneth Hyman
The Knack ...and How to Get It Richard Lester Oscar Lewenstein
1966
(20th)
The Spy Who Came in from the Cold Martin Ritt Martin Ritt
Alfie Lewis Gilbert Lewis Gilbert
Georgy Girl Silvio Narizzano Robert A. Goldston
Otto Plaschkes
Morgan – A Suitable Case for Treatment Karel Reisz Leon Clore
1967
(21st)
A Man For All Seasons Fred Zinnemann Fred Zinnemann
Accident Joseph Losey Joseph Losey
Norman Priggen
Blow-Up Michelangelo Antonioni Carlo Ponti
The Deadly Affair Sidney Lumet Sidney Lumet

1993–present

1990s

Film Director(s) Producer(s)
1992
(46th)
The Crying Game Neil Jordan Stephen Woolley
1993
(47th)
Shadowlands Richard Attenborough Brian Eastman
Tom & Viv Brian Gilbert Marc Samuelson Harvey Kass Peter Samuelson
Naked Mike Leigh Simon Channing Williams
Raining Stones Ken Loach Sally Hibbin
1994
(48th)
Shallow Grave Danny Boyle Andrew Macdonald
Backbeat Iain Softley Finola Dwyer
Bhaji on the Beach Gurinder Chadha Nadine Marsh-Edwards
Priest Antonia Bird George S. J. Faber
1995
(49th)
The Madness of King George Nicholas Hytner Stephen Evans
David Parfitt
Carrington Christopher Hampton Ronald Shedlo
John McGrath
Trainspotting Danny Boyle Andrew Macdonald
Land and Freedom Ken Loach Rebecca O'Brien
1996
(50th)
Secrets & Lies Mike Leigh Simon Channing Williams
Richard III Richard Loncraine Lisa Katselas Paré
Stephen Bayly
Brassed Off Mark Herman Steve Abbott
Carla's Song Ken Loach Sally Hibbin
1997
(51st)
Nil by Mouth Gary Oldman Luc Besson
Gary Oldman
Douglas Urbanski
The Full Monty Peter Cattaneo Uberto Pasolini
Mrs Brown John Madden Sarah Curtis
Regeneration Gillies MacKinnon Allan Scott
Peter R. Simpson
The Borrowers Peter Hewitt Tim Bevan
Eric Fellner
Rachel Talalay
Twenty Four Seven Shane Meadows Imogen West
1998
(52nd)
Elizabeth Shekhar Kapur Alison Owen
Eric Fellner
Tim Bevan
Hilary and Jackie Anand Tucker Andy Paterson
Nicolas Kent
Little Voice Mark Herman Elizabeth Karlsen
Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels Guy Ritchie Matthew Vaughn
Sliding Doors Peter Howitt Sydney Pollack
Philippa Braithwaite
William Horberg
1999
(53rd)
East Is East Damien O'Donnell Leslee Udwin
Notting Hill Roger Michell Duncan Kenworthy
Topsy-Turvy Mike Leigh Simon Channing Williams
Wonderland Michael Winterbottom Michele Camarda
Andrew Eaton
Ratcatcher Lynne Ramsay Gavin Emerson
Onegin Martha Fiennes Ileen Maisel
Simon Bosanquet

2000s

Film Director(s) Producer(s)
2000
(54th)
Billy Elliot Stephen Daldry Greg Brenman
Jon Finn
Chicken Run Nick Park Peter Lord
David Sproxton
Sexy Beast Jonathan Glazer Jeremy Thomas
Last Resort Paweł Pawlikowski Ruth Caleb
The House of Mirth Terence Davies Olivia Stewart
2001
(55th)
Gosford Park Robert Altman Bob Balaban
David Levy
Bridget Jones's Diary Sharon Maguire Tim Bevan
Eric Fellner
Jonathan Cavendish
Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone Chris Columbus David Heyman
Iris Richard Eyre Robert Fox
Scott Rudin
Me Without You Sandra Goldbacher Finola Dwyer
2002
(56th)
The Warrior Asif Kapadia Bertrand Faivre
The Hours Stephen Daldry Scott Rudin
Robert Fox
Dirty Pretty Things Stephen Frears Tracey Seaward
Robert Jones
Bend It Like Beckham Gurinder Chadha Deepak Nayar
The Magdalene Sisters Peter Mullan Frances Higson
2003
(57th)
Touching the Void Kevin Macdonald John Smithson
Cold Mountain Anthony Minghella Sydney Pollack
William Horberg
Albert Berger
Ron Yerxa
Girl with a Pearl Earring Peter Webber Anand Tucker
Andy Paterson
Love Actually Richard Curtis Duncan Kenworthy
Tim Bevan
Eric Fellner
In This World Michael Winterbottom Andrew Eaton
Anita Overland
2004
(58th)
My Summer of Love Paweł Pawlikowski Tanya Seghatchian
Chris Collins
Vera Drake Mike Leigh Simon Channing Williams
Alain Sarde
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban Alfonso Cuarón David Heyman
Chris Columbus
Mark Radcliffe
Shaun of the Dead Edgar Wright Nira Park
Dead Man's Shoes Shane Meadows Mark Herbert
2005
(59th)
Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit Nick Park
Steve Box
Claire Jennings
David Sproxton
Bob Baker
The Constant Gardener Fernando Meirelles Simon Channing Williams
Jeffrey Caine
Pride & Prejudice Joe Wright Tim Bevan
Eric Fellner
Paul Webster
Deborah Moggach
A Cock and Bull Story Michael Winterbottom Andrew Eaton
Martin Hardy
Festival Annie Griffin Christopher Young
2006
(60th)
The Last King of Scotland Kevin Macdonald Andrea Calderwood
Lisa Bryer
Charles Steel
Peter Morgan
The Queen Stephen Frears Tracey Seaward
Christine Langan
Andy Harries
Peter Morgan
Casino Royale Martin Campbell Michael G. Wilson
Barbara Broccoli
Robert Wade
Paul Haggis
Neal Purvis
United 93 Paul Greengrass Tim Bevan
Lloyd Levin
Notes on a Scandal Richard Eyre Scott Rudin
Robert Fox
2007
(61st)
This Is England Shane Meadows Mark Herbert
Atonement Joe Wright Tim Bevan
Eric Fellner
Paul Webster
The Bourne Ultimatum Paul Greengrass Patrick Crowley
Frank Marshall
Paul L. Sandberg
Doug Liman
Control Anton Corbijn Tony Wilson
Deborah Curtis
Eastern Promises David Cronenberg Paul Webster
Robert Lantos
2008
(62nd)
Man on Wire James Marsh Simon Chinn
Hunger Steve McQueen Laura Hastings-Smith
Robin Gutch
In Bruges Martin McDonagh Graham Broadbent
Peter Czernin
Mamma Mia! Phyllida Lloyd Judy Craymer
Benny Andersson
Björn Ulvaeus
Phyllida Lloyd
Tom Hanks
Rita Wilson
Slumdog Millionaire Danny Boyle
Loveleen Tandan
Christian Colson
2009
(63rd)
Fish Tank Andrea Arnold Kees Kasander
Nick Laws
Andrea Arnold
An Education Lone Scherfig Finola Dwyer
Amanda Posey
Lone Scherfig
Nick Hornby
In the Loop Armando Iannucci Kevin Loader
Adam Tandy
Armando Iannucci
Jesse Armstrong
Simon Blackwell
Tony Roche
Moon Duncan Jones Stuart Fenegan
Trudie Styler
Duncan Jones
Nathan Parker
Nowhere Boy Sam Taylor-Wood Robert Bernstein
Douglas Rae
Kevin Loader
Sam Taylor-Johnson
Matt Greenhalgh

2010s

Film Director(s) Nominee(s)
2010
(64th)
The King's Speech Tom Hooper Tom Hooper
Iain Canning
Emile Sherman
Gareth Unwin
127 Hours Danny Boyle Danny Boyle
Christian Colson
John Smithson
Another Year Mike Leigh Mike Leigh
Georgina Lowe
Four Lions Chris Morris Chris Morris
Mark Herbert
Derrin Schlesinger
Made in Dagenham Nigel Cole Nigel Cole
Stephen Woolley
Elizabeth Karlsen
2011
(65th)
Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy Tomas Alfredson Tomas Alfredson
Eric Fellner
Bridget O'Connor
Peter Straughan
Robyn Slovo
Tim Bevan
My Week with Marilyn Simon Curtis Simon Curtis
Adrian Hodges
David Parfitt
Harvey Weinstein
Senna Asif Kapadia Tim Bevan
Eric Fellner
James Gay-Rees
Asif Kapadia
Manish Pandey
Shame Steve McQueen Emile Sherman
Abi Morgan
Steve McQueen
Iain Canning
We Need to Talk About Kevin Lynne Ramsay Jennifer Fox
Rory Stewart Kinnear
Lynne Ramsay
Luc Roeg
Robert Salerno
2012
(66th)
Skyfall Sam Mendes Sam Mendes
Michael G. Wilson
Barbara Broccoli
Neal Purvis
Robert Wade
John Logan
Anna Karenina Joe Wright Joe Wright
Tim Bevan
Eric Fellner
Paul Webster
Tom Stoppard
The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel John Madden John Madden
Graham Broadbent
Pete Czernin
Oliver Parker
Les Misérables Tom Hooper Tom Hooper
Tim Bevan
Eric Fellner
Debra Hayward
Cameron Mackintosh
William Nicholson
Alain Boublil
Claude-Michel Schönberg
Herbert Kretzmer
Seven Psychopaths Martin McDonagh Martin McDonagh
Graham Broadbent
Pete Czernin
2013
(67th)
Gravity Alfonso Cuarón Alfonso Cuarón
David Heyman
Jonás Cuarón
Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom Justin Chadwick Justin Chadwick
Anant Singh
David M. Thompson
William Nicholson
Philomena Stephen Frears Gabrielle Tana
Steve Coogan
Tracey Seaward
Rush Ron Howard Ron Howard
Andrew Eaton
Peter Morgan
Saving Mr. Banks John Lee Hancock Alison Owen
Ian Collie
Philip Steuer
Kelly Marcel
Sue Smith
The Selfish Giant Clio Barnard Tracy O'Riordan
2014
(68th)
The Theory of Everything James Marsh Tim Bevan
Eric Fellner
Lisa Bruce
Anthony McCarten
'71 Yann Demange Angus Lamont
Robin Gutch
Gregory Burke
Paddington Paul King David Heyman
Pride Matthew Warchus David Livingstone
Stephen Beresford
The Imitation Game Morten Tyldum Nora Grossman
Ido Ostrowsky
Teddy Schwarzman
Under the Skin Jonathan Glazer James Wilson
Nick Wechsler
Walter Campbell
2015
(69th)
Brooklyn John Crowley John Crowley
Finola Dwyer
Amanda Posey
Nick Hornby
45 Years Andrew Haigh Andrew Haigh
Tristan Goligher
Amy Asif Kapadia James Gay-Rees
The Danish Girl Tom Hooper Tom Hooper
Tim Bevan
Eric Fellner
Anne Harrison
Gail Mutrux
Lucinda Coxon
Ex Machina Alex Garland Andrew Macdonald
Allon Reich
The Lobster Yorgos Lanthimos Ceci Dempsey
Ed Guiney
Lee Magiday
Efthimis Filippou
2016
(70th)
I, Daniel Blake Ken Loach Ken Loach
Rebecca O'Brien
Paul Laverty
American Honey Andrea Arnold Andrea Arnold
Lars Knudsen
Pouya Shahbazian
Jay Van Hoy
Denial Mick Jackson Mick Jackson
Gary Foster
Russ Krasnoff
David Hare
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them David Yates David Yates
J. K. Rowling
David Heyman
Steve Kloves
Lionel Wigram
Notes on Blindness Peter Middleton
James Spinney
Peter Middleton
James Spinney
Mike Brett
Jo-Jo Ellison
Steve Jamison
Under the Shadow Babak Anvari Babak Anvari
Emily Leo
Oliver Roskill
Lucan Toh
2017
(71st)
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri Martin McDonagh Martin McDonagh
Graham Broadbent
Peter Czernin
Darkest Hour Joe Wright Joe Wright
Tim Bevan
Lisa Bruce
Eric Fellner
Anthony McCarten
Douglas Urbanski
The Death of Stalin Armando Iannucci Armando Iannucci
Kevin Loader
Laurent Zeitoun
Yann Zenou
Ian Martin
David Schneider
God's Own Country Francis Lee Francis Lee
Manon Ardisson
Jack Tarling
Lady Macbeth William Oldroyd William Oldroyd
Fodhla Cronin O'Reilly
Alice Birch
Paddington 2 Paul King Paul King
David Heyman
Simon Farnaby
2018
(72nd)
The Favourite Yorgos Lanthimos Yorgos Lanthimos
Ceci Dempsey
Ed Guiney
Lee Magiday
Deborah Davis
Tony McNamara
Beast Michael Pearce Michael Pearce
Kristian Brodie
Lauren Dark
Ivana MacKinnon
Bohemian Rhapsody Bryan Singer[a] Graham King
Anthony McCarten
McQueen Ian Bonhôte Ian Bonhôte
Peter Ettedgui
Andee Ryder
Nick Taussig
Stan & Ollie Jon S. Baird Jon S. Baird
Faye Ward
Jeff Pope
You Were Never Really Here Lynne Ramsay Lynne Ramsay
Rosa Attab
Pascal Caucheteux
James Wilson

Notes

  1. ^ Bryan Singer was replaced by Dexter Fletcher near the end of principal photography; Singer retained sole director credit in accordance with Directors Guild of America rules. Fletcher is credited as an executive producer.[2]

References

  1. ^ British Academy of Film and Television Arts. "EE British Academy Film Awards: Rules and Guidelines 2017/18, Feature Film Categories" (PDF). BAFTA website. Retrieved 19 Feb 2018.
  2. ^ Galuppo, Mia (12 June 2018). "Bryan Singer to Get Directing Credit on Queen Biopic 'Bohemian Rhapsody'". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 21 June 2018.

External links

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Rebecca O'Brien

Rebecca O'Brien is a BAFTA-winning film producer, known especially for her work with Ken Loach.

O'Brien was born in London, England in 1957.Together with Loach and scriptwriter Paul Laverty, she runs the production company Sixteen Films, formed in 2002. The trio received an "outstanding contribution" award from BAFTA Scotland in November 2016.Her career began in theatre and children's television and her early cinema work includes My Beautiful Laundrette (1985), on which she was location manager, and Bean (1997), which she co-produced.She was co-producer on Loach's Hidden Agenda (1990) and sole producer on his Land and Freedom (1995) and on many of his subsequent films, two of which, The Wind That Shakes the Barley (2006) and I, Daniel Blake (2016) received the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival. Laverty, Loach and O'Brien won the 2017 BAFTA Award for Outstanding British Film, for I, Daniel Blake.She served as a member of the board of the UK Film Council, until that body's dissolution in 2010, and of the UK Film Industry Training Board. She is a board member of PACT, the trade body for independent film production companies in the United Kingdom, and of the European Film Academy. She is also a member of The British Screen Advisory Council.

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel is a 2011 British comedy-drama film directed by John Madden. The screenplay, written by Ol Parker, is based on the 2004 novel These Foolish Things, by Deborah Moggach, and features an ensemble cast consisting of Judi Dench, Celia Imrie, Bill Nighy, Ronald Pickup, Maggie Smith, Tom Wilkinson and Penelope Wilton, as a group of British pensioners moving to a retirement hotel in India, run by the young and eager Sonny, played by Dev Patel. The movie was produced by Participant Media and Blueprint Pictures on a budget of $10 million.

Producers Graham Broadbent and Peter Czernin first saw the potential for a film in Deborah Moggach's novel with the idea of exploring the lives of the elderly beyond what one would expect of their age group. With the assistance of screenwriter Ol Parker, they came up with a script in which they take the older characters completely out of their element and involve them in a romantic comedy.

Principal photography began on 10 October 2010 in India, and most of the filming took place in the Indian state of Rajasthan, including the cities of Jaipur and Udaipur. Ravla Khempur, an equestrian hotel which was originally the palace of a tribal chieftain in the village of Khempur, was chosen as the site for the film hotel.

The film was released in the United Kingdom on 24 February 2012 and received critical acclaim; The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel opened to strong box-office business in the United Kingdom and continued to build worldwide. It became a surprise box-office hit following its international release, eventually grossing nearly $137 million worldwide.

It was ranked among the highest-grossing 2012 releases in Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom, and as one of the highest-grossing speciality releases of the year. A sequel, The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, began production in India in January 2014, and was released on 26 February 2015.

Wall to Wall Media

Wall to Wall Media, part of Warner Bros. Television Productions UK (formerly Shed Media Group), is an independent television production company that produces event specials and drama, factual entertainment, science and history programmes for broadcast by networks in both the United Kingdom and United States.

In January 2009, Wall to Wall's first feature film Man on Wire won a BAFTA award for Outstanding British Film and followed this success with an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature. Previously, the company had won a Peabody Award in 2000 for The 1900 House.Wall to Wall joined the Shed Media Group in November 2007.

The company's name derives from negative references made in the mid-1980s, by then BBC Director-General Alasdair Milne and in the title of a book by Financial Times journalist Chris Dunkley, to "wall-to-wall Dallas" as a possible aftereffect of the coming deregulation of UK broadcasting. Future BBC2 controller Jane Root, among the company's founders, considered this a negative, puritanical and conservative view of the medium's possibilities (ref. NME, 17 May 1986) and the name "Wall to Wall Television" was adopted as a conscious celebration of the medium, which its founders considered the "establishment" of the time to be frightened of.

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