B. J. Surhoff

William James "B. J." Surhoff (born August 4, 1964) is a former catcher, outfielder, first baseman, third baseman, and designated hitter in Major League Baseball. Over his 18-year major league career, he played every position except pitcher. After playing for the Orioles from 1996 to 2000, he rejoined the team in 2003 and played through the 2005 season. He started his career with the Milwaukee Brewers (1987–1995) and also played for the Atlanta Braves (2000–2002). Surhoff began his career as a catcher, and after playing third base in the mid-1990s, shifted to become primarily a left fielder.

B. J. Surhoff
B.J. Surhoff
Left fielder / Catcher / Third baseman
Born: August 4, 1964 (age 55)
Bronx, New York
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 8, 1987, for the Milwaukee Brewers
Last MLB appearance
October 2, 2005, for the Baltimore Orioles
MLB statistics
Batting average.282
Hits2,326
Home runs188
Runs batted in1,153
Teams
Career highlights and awards
B. J. Surhoff
Medal record
Men's baseball
Representing  United States
Olympic Games
Silver medal – second place 1984 Los Angeles Team
Intercontinental Cup
Silver medal – second place 1983 Brussels Team
Pan American Games
Bronze medal – third place 1983 Caracas Team

Baseball career

Born in the Bronx, Surhoff attended Rye High School in Westchester, New York. After high school he attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he was honored as the 1985 ACC Male Athlete of the Year, and played on the very first (1984) U.S. Olympic baseball team. He was a two-time first team All-American at UNC and his career batting average of .392 was a school record until Dustin Ackley set the mark at .412 in 2009.[1]

He was selected by the Brewers with the first overall pick of the 1985 amateur draft. Surhoff was a very versatile player, having appeared at every position except pitcher over the course of his career. He had 2,326 hits, 188 home runs and 1,153 RBI in his career. Although always a consistent hitter, having hit over .280 in 12 of his 19 seasons, Surhoff's finest season was his 1999 campaign with the Orioles, in which he led the American League in at-bats (673), ranked second in hits (207), was selected to the American League All-Star team, and ultimately won Most Valuable Oriole honors for the season, becoming one of five players to get 200 or more hits in a season for the team. He also participated in the Home Run Derby. In other notable seasons, he finished sixth in the AL in doubles in 1993 with the Brewers and finished fifth in batting average in the AL with the Brewers in 1995 with a .320 average.

In 2007, Surhoff was elected to the Orioles Hall of Fame, with the official induction ceremony occurring before the start of the Orioles–Twins game on August 25, 2007, at Oriole Park at Camden Yards.

Personal life

His father Dick Surhoff played two years in the NBA in 1952–1953 and 1953–1954 and his brother Rick Surhoff appeared in nine games in 1985 as a relief pitcher for the Philadelphia Phillies and the Texas Rangers. He also has a brother named Mark who lives in Rye, New York. His son, Austin Surhoff, swam at the University of Texas and won the 200 individual medley and 200 backstroke at the 2010 Big 12 Championships.[2] Then he won the 200 Individual Medley national title a month later.

Surhoff lives in Cockeysville, Maryland with his wife Polly and their four children. He is the president of Pathfinders for Autism, a Hunt Valley support group for families with autistic children. Surhoff's son, Mason, is autistic.[3]

Surhoff is the uncle of former UNC third-team All-American pitcher Brian Moran, and current Pittsburgh Pirates third baseman/outfielder Colin Moran.[4][5] In 2008, 2009 and 2012 Surhoff was a spring training instructor for the Baltimore Orioles.[6][7]

See also

References

  1. ^ Adam Lucas (February 3, 2002). "Tar Heel Monthly: Catching Up B. J. Surhoff". Archived from the original on October 8, 2012. Retrieved April 5, 2011.
  2. ^ "Feigen, Surhoff earn NCAA automatic-qualifying marks at Big 12 Championships". February 25, 2010.
  3. ^ The Toy Department: Catching Up With ... former Oriole B. J. Surhoff – Baltimore sports: Ravens, Orioles, Terps blog by Baltimore Sun reporters – baltimoresun.com
  4. ^ "Player Bio: Brian Moran". Archived from the original on 2009-04-01. Retrieved April 5, 2010.
  5. ^ "Player Bio: Colin Moran". Archived from the original on 2011-03-09. Retrieved April 5, 2011.
  6. ^ Sports Illustrated, August 2, 2010, Where are they Now?, p.86, Published by Time Inc.
  7. ^ "MASN Sport, School of Roch: Late-inning intrigue". Retrieved February 13, 2012.

External links

1984 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.The NCAA recognizes two different All-America selectors for the 1984 college baseball season: the American Baseball Coaches Association (since 1947) and Baseball America (since 1981).

1985 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.The NCAA recognizes two different All-America selectors for the 1985 college baseball season: the American Baseball Coaches Association (since 1947) and Baseball America (since 1981).

1985 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1985 Milwaukee Brewers season involved the Brewers' finishing 6th in the American League East with a record of 71 wins and 90 losses.

1987 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1987 Milwaukee Brewers season featured the team finish in third place in the American League East, with a record of 91 wins and 71 losses. The team began the season at a red-hot pace, winning their first 13 games under first-year manager Tom Trebelhorn. Other highlights included Paul Molitor capturing the imaginations of Milwaukee fans with a 39-game hitting streak and Juan Nieves tossing the first and only no-hitter in Brewers history on April 15 with a 7-0 blanking of the Baltimore Orioles.

1988 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1988 Milwaukee Brewers season involved the Brewers finishing 3rd in the American League East with a record of 87 wins and 75 losses.

1992 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1992 Milwaukee Brewers season featured the team finishing in second place in the American League East with a record of 92 wins and 70 losses.

1995 Milwaukee Brewers season

The Milwaukee Brewers' 1995 season involved the Brewers' finishing fourth in the American League Central with a record of 65 wins and 79 losses. The 1995 Brewers were the last Major League Baseball team to use a bullpen car, until the 2018 Arizona Diamondbacks.

1996 American League Division Series

The 1996 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 1996 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 1, and ended on Saturday, October 5, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

(1) Cleveland Indians (Central Division champion, 99–62) vs. (4) Baltimore Orioles (Wild Card, 88–74): Orioles win series, 3–1.

(2) Texas Rangers (Western Division champion, 90–72) vs. (3) New York Yankees (Eastern Division champion, 92–70): Yankees win series, 3–1.The Baltimore Orioles and New York Yankees went on to meet in the AL Championship Series (ALCS). The Yankees became the American League champion, and defeated the of National League champion Atlanta Braves in the 1996 World Series.

1996 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1996 Baltimore Orioles season in which the Orioles finishing 2nd in the American League East with a record of 88 wins and 74 losses and qualifying for the post-season as the Wild Card team. The Orioles broke the all-time record for most home runs hit by a team (set at 240 by the 1961 New York Yankees) with 257. During the season, four Orioles scored at least 100 runs, four drove in at least 100 runs and seven hit at least 20 home runs. The Orioles pitching staff allowed 209 home runs, 1,604 hits and had an ERA of 5.15. The Orioles defeated the Cleveland Indians in the ALDS and then lost in the ALCS to the New York Yankees.

1999 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1999 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing 4th in the American League East with a record of 78 wins and 84 losses.

2000 Atlanta Braves season

The 2000 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 35th season in Atlanta along with the 125th season in the National League and 130th overall. The Braves won their ninth consecutive division title, however, the 2000 season would mark the first time since 1990 that the Braves did not appear in the National League Championship Series. One of the highlights of the season was that the All-Star Game was held at Turner Field in Atlanta.

2000 Baltimore Orioles season

The 2000 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing 4th in the American League East with a record of 74 wins and 88 losses.

2001 Atlanta Braves season

The 2001 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 36th season in Atlanta and 131st overall. The Braves won their tenth consecutive division title. The season saw the team finish first in the NL East Division with an 88-74 record – the worst among playoff teams in 2001, and also the worst record for the Braves since 1990 (meaning the worst record through their run of 14 consecutive division titles starting in 1991. Not counting the strike-shortened 1994 season). Atlanta finished the season with just a 2 game division lead over the Philadelphia Phillies.

The Braves swept the favored Houston Astros in the NLDS before losing to the eventual World Series champion Arizona Diamondbacks in the NLCS 4-1, in which Randy Johnson and Curt Schilling notably dominated Atlanta's offense.

2003 Baltimore Orioles season

The 2003 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing 4th in the American League East with a record of 71 wins and 91 losses.

2004 Baltimore Orioles season

The 2004 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing 3rd in the American League East with a record of 78 wins and 84 losses. The team led Major League Baseball in at bats (5,736) and hits (1,614).

2005 Baltimore Orioles season

The 2005 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing 4th in the American League East with a record of 74 wins and 88 losses. The team started off hot, compiling a record of 42 wins and 30 losses while spending 62 days in first place in AL East. After June 23, the team started slipping on the way to a losing record and manager Lee Mazzilli's dismissal in early August.

Dick Surhoff

Richard Clifford Surhoff Jr. (November 16, 1929 – May 1, 1987) was an American professional basketball player. Surhoff was selected in the 1952 NBA draft by the New York Knicks after a collegiate career at Long Island and John Marshall College. He played for two seasons, one for the Knicks and the other for the Milwaukee Hawks.Dick Surhoff was the father of professional baseball players Rick and B. J. Surhoff. He was also the grandfather of Brian and Colin Moran.

Athlete of the Year
Male Athlete of the Year
Female Athlete of the Year
Players
Coaches
Veteran players
(pre-1947 era)

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.