B-Boy

Benito "Benny" Cuntapay (born December 29, 1978) is an American professional wrestler better known by his ring name, B-Boy. He is best known for his work in the independent circuit, where he worked in promotions like Combat Zone Wrestling (CZW), Pro Wrestling Guerrilla (PWG), Jersey All Pro Wrestling (JAPW) or Wrestling Society X (WSX). He is a CZW World Heavyweight Champion, one-time CZW Iron Man Champion and three-times PWG World Tag Team Champion (once with Homicide and twice with Super Dragon). He also won the CZW 2003 Best of the Best tournament and the PWG 2004 Tango & Cash Invitational tournament with Homicide. He also wrestled as Bael for Lucha Underground, but was killed by Matanza as part of the storyline.

B-Boy
B-BoyCZW
B-Boy in 2006.
Birth nameBenito Cuntapay
BornDecember 29, 1978 (age 40)
San Diego, California, United States
ResidenceVista, California, United States[1]
Professional wrestling career
Ring name(s)B-Boy
Bael[2]
Benny Chong
Delikado[1]
Billed height5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)[1]
Billed weight200 lb (91 kg)
Billed fromSan Diego, California[1]
Trained byChristopher Daniels[1]
Cory Van Kleeck[1]
Kevin Quin[1]
Rich Frisk[1]
Tom Howard[1]
Debut2000

Career

Training and independent circuit

After being trained by numerous wrestlers, including Christopher Daniels, Cuntapay began working on the independent circuit. Using the name Benny Chong, he quickly formed a tag team with "Funky" Billy Kim in Ultimate Pro Wrestling (UPW) known as "The Manilla Thrillaz".[1] From 1999 to 2003, he worked for numerous promotions, including Revolution Pro Wrestling, EPIC Pro Wrestling and Golden State Championship Wrestling.[1] He also wrestled for the United Independent Wrestling Alliance, where he won the UIWA Cruiserweight Championship.[1]

In late 2003, B-Boy began working primarily for Combat Zone Wrestling, Jersey All Pro Wrestling, and Pro Wrestling Guerrilla, however, he still made numerous appearances for Southern California independent promotions.[1] On July 18, 2003, he competed in the World Power Wrestling (WPW) "Best of the West Tournament", defeating Scorpio Sky and Disco Machine en route to the semi-finals, where his match against Lil' Cholo ended in a draw, sending both of them through to the finals. Cholo won the four-way final to win the tournament.[1] A month later, on August 16, at an All Pro Wrestling (APW) show, B-Boy defeated James Choi to win the APW Worldwide Internet Championship.[1] Less than a week later, he appeared for Major League Wrestling (MLW), teaming with Nosawa in a loss to Jose and Joel Maximo.[3]

On January 31, 2004, B-Boy went to Essen, Germany to compete for the Germany-based promotion Westside Xtreme Wrestling, and lost to X-Dream in a four-way match that also contained Thumbtack Jack and Steve Douglas.[4] In June he competed in the JCW J-Cup Tournament, making it to the final by defeating Chris Idol and Josh Daniels, before losing to Super Dragon. The next month, he made his first appearance for Ring of Honor (ROH), losing to Josh Daniels in the main event on July 17 at Do or Die III.[5] On August 6, 2004, he competed in the WPW "Best of the West Tournament" for the second consecutive year, defeating Jardi Frantz in the final to win.[1]

In 2005, B-Boy teamed up with Super Dragon, as "Team PWG", and entered Chikara's Tag World Grand Prix tournament. They defeated the "Mystery Team" of Glenn Spectre and Ken the Box in the first round, before losing to Team Osaka Pro, Ebessan and Billyken Kid, in the second.[6] He also returned to ROH, defeating Kevin Steen in a singles match on February 19 at Do or Die IV, but losing a six-way, also containing Izzy, Steen, Deranged and Dixie, to Azrieal on March 5.[7][8] He made his Pro-Pain Pro Wrestling (3PW) debut on June 18, 2005, defeating Ruckus.[9] He made another appearance in ROH on October 29 at This Means War, losing to Colt Cabana.[10]

In 2006, he returned to APW, losing to Mr. Prime Time at APW Gym Wars on April 1.[11]

Combat Zone Wrestling (2003–2010, 2016-present)

B-Boy masked
A masked B-Boy making his way to the ring in 2008.

In Combat Zone Wrestling (CZW), Cuntapay, using the name B-Boy, joined the Hi V faction, with Messiah and The Backseat Boys, managed by Dewey Donovan.[1] On April 12, 2003, B-Boy defeated Deranged, Lil Cholo, Jay Briscoe and Sonjay Dutt to win the Best of the Best tournament.[12][13] On July 20, Hi V turned on CZW owner John Zandig, leading to the rest of the roster chasing them out of the building.[14] This allowed the Hi V members to take a short hiatus from CZW, and B-Boy returned on the show of October 11, Uprising, defeating Homicide.[15][16] He continued working regularly throughout the end of 2003 and 2004, gaining numerous title matches, but failing to win them.[17][18] On July 10, 2004, B-Boy competed in the fourth annual Best of the Best tournament in an attempt to win it for the second consecutive time, but lost to Roderick Strong in the quarter-finals.[19] After another short hiatus from CZW, B-Boy defeated Dan Maff on December 11 to win the Xtreme Strong Style Tournament. This earned him a match that night against the CZW Iron Man Champion, Chris Hero, who he then defeated to win the championship.[20] After successful defenses against Kaos, B-Boy lost the championship to Frankie The Mobster on February 5, 2005 at Only the Strong: Scarred for Life.[20][21][22]

On April 2, 2005, B-Boy unsuccessfully challenged Ruckus for the CZW World Heavyweight Championship, and on May 14, he competed in the fifth Best of the Best tournament, making it to the finals, where he lost to Mike Quackenbush in a four-way match.[23][24] On August 13, B-Boy lost a Loser Leaves Town match to Nate Webb, although he returned just under a month later on September 10, at the Chri$ Ca$h Memorial Show.[25][26] After this, he competed only sporadically for CZW, making an appearance at the 2006 Chri$ Ca$h Memorial Show, and then, later that night, unsuccessfully challenging LuFisto for the CZW Iron Man Championship.[27][28] He also competed in the seventh Best of the Best tournament on July 14, 2007, defeating Cheech, Ricochet, Brandon Thomaselli and Jigsaw en route to the final, where he lost to Joker.[29]

On January 30, 2010, at High Stakes 4 – Sky's the Limit B-Boy won the CZW World Heavyweight Championship, by defeating the previous champion Drake Younger.[30] He held the championship for two weeks, before losing it to Jon Moxley on February 13.[30][31] B-Boy announced on his Twitter that he would be returning to CZW to face AR Fox.[32] Later, it was announced that B-Boy would be facing Jonathan Gresham at Proving Grounds.[33]

IWA Mid-South (2003–2007)

B-Boy first made appeared in Independent Wrestling Association Mid-South (IWA Mid-South) as part of the 2003 Ted Petty Invitational, defeating J.C. Bailey and Nigel McGuinness before losing to Chris Hero in the semifinals.[34] He later appeared on April 9, 2004, in a loss to A.J. Styles.[35] He also appeared the following night, when he defeated Chris Hero in a two out of three falls match that lasted 45 minutes.[36] He continued to wrestle sporadically for IWA Mid-South throughout 2004, facing wrestlers including CM Punk, Petey Williams, and Alex Shelley.[37][38][39]

At the start of 2005, B-Boy took a hiatus from IWA Mid-South, returning on April 29 at Revenge Served Cold, defeating Sal Thomaselli in a Tables, Ladders, and Chairs match, in what was his last match in IWA Mid-South for over a year.[40] He made his return on September 29, 2006, losing to Arik Cannon in the first round of the Ted Petty Invitational tournament.[41] He made further appearances in December 2006, and again in June 2007.[42][43]

Jersey All Pro Wrestling

B-Boy @ JAPW in November 08
B-Boy at a JAPW show in November 2008.

On June 5, 2004, B-Boy debuted in Jersey All Pro Wrestling (JAPW), losing to Trent Acid, however, his second appearance was not until September 18 of that year, when he lost to Low Ki.[44][45] In only his fourth appearance for the promotion on January 29, 2005, B-Boy and Homicide, collectively known as The Strong Style Thugs, defeated The Christopher Street Connection to win the JAPW Tag Team Championship.[46] They held the championship for just under two months, before losing it to the team of Teddy Hart and Jack Evans in a steel cage match.[47] After more sporadic appearances, B-Boy defeated Azrieal to win the JAPW Light Heavyweight Championship on June 4, 2005, however he was stripped of the title later that year.[48]

He continued to make sporadic appearances until December 8, 2007, when he lost to Azrieal and Arcadia in what was billed as his retirement match.[49][50] Despite that, he later returned to JAPW just under a year later, unsuccessfully challenging the JAPW Heavyweight Champion Kenny Omega.[51] He later returned to wrestle New Jersey State Champion Bandido Jr. on January 24, 2009.[52]

Pro Wrestling Guerrilla (2003–2006, 2009, 2011-2014)

In 2003, B-Boy made his Pro Wrestling Guerrilla (PWG) debut, defeating Tony Kozina on August 29.[53] For the next year, he made few appearances, until November 2005, when he began competing for PWG on a regular basis.[1] On November 15, he and Ronin challenged Davey Richards and Super Dragon for the PWG World Tag Team Championship in a losing effort.[54] He then competed mainly in singles competition, taking on wrestlers including Chris Sabin, El Generico and Excalibur, with mixed results.[55][56][57]

In mid-2006, he began competing for various championships in PWG, losing a World tag Team Championship match to Scott Lost and Chris Bosh with Human Tornado as his tag team partner, and he was defeated by the PWG World Champion, Joey Ryan in a Tables, Ladders and Chairs steel cage match.[58][59] On October 7, he teamed with Super Dragon to win the PWG World Tag Team Championship from Lost and Bosh.[60] After successful defenses against Chris Hero and Claudio Castagnoli, they lost the championship to Davey Richards and Roderick Strong on November 17.[61][62] They won the championship back the next day, however, by winning a four-way match, also containing the teams of Alex Shelley and Chris Sabin, and Hero and Castagnoli.[63] Their second title reign was also short-lived, however, as they lost the championship to El Generico and Quicksilver just over two weeks later on December 2.[64]

Championships and accomplishments

References

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External links

B-Boy Records

B-Boy Records was an important independent hip hop record label formed by Jack Allen and William Kamarra in 1986, and situated at 132nd Street and Cypress Avenue in the Bronx, New York City. Its most notable signing was Boogie Down Productions, and it released Boogie Down Productions' first singles, "South Bronx" (1986) and "The Bridge is Over" (1987), and the group's landmark debut album, Criminal Minded (1987). Other acts that recorded for the label included JVC Force, Cold Crush Brothers, Levi 167 and Jewel T.

The label's output is a mix of new names and old pioneers, and documents a period in which self-assertive lyrics begin to detail street life even as the music moved from hardcore drum-machine-based tracks to the horns and drum sounds of sampler-based hip hop. B-Boy Records folded in 1988, though Nate Patrin of Pitchfork Media reports that, "both Allen and Kamarra have set about reviving the B-Boy Records name independently of each other, and there seems to have been a number of bridges burned between the two men."

B-boy Lilou

Ali Ramdani (1984), better known by his stage name Lilou, is an Algerian-French b-boy breakdancer. He is part of the French crew Pockemon Crew and the all-star team LEGION X. Since the beginning of his career in 1999 he has won many international prizes, both with his crew and as a solo dancer. He has had a black belt in Kung Fu since he was sixteen.

He practices Islam and can speak Algerian-Arabic, French and English.

Lilou was the winner of the b-boy competition Red Bull BC One in 2005 and 2009. He is one of the only three competitors to have won the Red Bull BC One twice, the other two being Hong 10 and Menno. He also won Battle of the Year in 2003 with Pockemon Crew. In 2005, Lilou won the Chief Rocka award at the UK Bboy Championships. The following year, he was part of the Pockemon team that won the Crews competition at the UK Bboy Championships.In 2006 Lilou was featured in the game 'B-Boy', released by FreeStyleGames. In 2008 Lilou took part in Chemical Brothers' video Midnight Madness. He also appears in the film StreetDance 2. In 2012 he joined Madonna's MDNA Tour as a dancer and choreographer. In 2014, he became the winner of Undisputed. In doing so, he became the world champion bboy in 2014. He lists Michael Jackson, Zinedine Zidane, Muhammad Ali, and Jamiroquai as influences.

Lilou has been a breakdancer for 20 years. To celebrate his career, Red Bull dedicated him a website that tells his story.

B Boy (song)

"B Boy" is a song by American hip hop recording artist Meek Mill. It was released as a third single from Dreams Worth More Than Money on January 3, 2015, by Maybach Music Group and Atlantic Records. The song, which was produced by Sap, features guest appearances from Big Sean and ASAP Ferg.

B Boy Baby

"B Boy Baby" is a song written by Phil Spector, Ellie Greenwich, Jeff Barry, Craig Klepto Tucker, Peter Celik and Angela Hunte. It features uncredited vocals by singer Amy Winehouse and was produced by Salaam Remi for Mutya Buena's debut album, Real Girl, being released as the fourth and final single from the album.

Battle of the Year (film)

Battle of the Year is a 2013 American 3D dance film directed by Benson Lee. The film was released on September 20, 2013 through Screen Gems and stars Josh Holloway, Chris Brown, Laz Alonso, Caity Lotz, and Josh Peck.

Battle of the Year is based upon Lee's award-winning 2008 documentary Planet B-Boy, about the b-boying competition of the same name. The feature film includes cinematography by Vasco Nunes, Lee's director of photography on the original documentary.Variety magazine listed Battle of the Year as one of "Hollywood's biggest box office bombs of 2013" earning just $16.5 million against a $20 million production budget (excluding advertising and marketing budget).

Best of B-Boy Records

Best of B-Boy Records is a compilation album by Boogie Down Productions consisting of recordings for its first label, B-Boy Records. It is the final release to date by KRS-One under the Boogie Down Productions name. Best of B-Boy Records is essentially a repackaging of BDP's debut album Criminal Minded, with several b-sides and singles added.

Breakdancing

Breakdancing, also called breaking or b-boying/b-girling, is an athletic style of street dance. While diverse in the amount of variation available in the dance, breakdancing mainly consists of four kinds of movement: toprock, downrock, power moves and freezes. Breakdancing is typically set to songs containing drum breaks, especially in hip-hop, funk, soul music and breakbeat music, although modern trends allow for much wider varieties of music along certain ranges of tempo and beat patterns.

Breakdancing was created by African American youth during the late 1960s and early 1970s. The earliest breakdancing groups included the "Zulu Kings" and "Clark Kent". By the late seventies, the dance had begun to spread to other communities and was gaining wider popularity; at the same time, the dance had peaked in popularity among African Americans.A practitioner of this dance is called a b-boy, b-girl, or breaker. Although the term "breakdance" is frequently used to refer to the dance in popular culture and in the mainstream entertainment industry, "b-boying" and "breaking" are the original terms and are preferred by the majority of the pioneers and most notable practitioners.

Freeze (b-boy move)

A freeze is a b-boying technique that involves halting all body motion, often in an interesting or balance-intensive position. It is implied that the position is hit and held from motion as if freezing in motion, or into ice. Freezes often incorporate various twists and distortions of the body into stylish and often difficult positions.

Spins are often combined with freezes, and the spins are usually done in the form of kicks. Various handstands ("inverts", "Nikes", and "pikes") can be frozen, and skilled breakers sometimes incorporate the technique of threading into handstands by forming a loop with one arm and leg, then "threading" the other leg in and out of the loop.

Hip-hop dance

Hip-hop dance refers to street dance styles primarily performed to hip-hop music or that have evolved as part of hip-hop culture. It includes a wide range of styles primarily breaking which was created in the 1970s and made popular by dance crews in the United States. The television show Soul Train and the 1980s films Breakin', Beat Street, and Wild Style showcased these crews and dance styles in their early stages; therefore, giving hip-hop mainstream exposure. The dance industry responded with a commercial, studio-based version of hip-hop—sometimes called "new style"—and a hip-hop influenced style of jazz dance called "jazz-funk". Classically trained dancers developed these studio styles in order to create choreography from the hip-hop dances that were performed on the street. Because of this development, hip-hop dance is practiced in both dance studios and outdoor spaces.

The commercialization of hip-hop dance continued into the 1990s and 2000s with the production of several television shows and movies such as The Grind, Planet B-Boy, Rize, StreetDance 3D, America's Best Dance Crew, Saigon Electric, the Step Up film series, and The LXD, a web series. Though the dance is established in entertainment, including mild representation in theater, it maintains a strong presence in urban neighborhoods which has led to the creation of street dance derivatives Memphis jookin, turfing, jerkin', and krump.

1980s films, television shows, and the Internet have contributed to introducing hip-hop dance outside the United States. Since being exposed, educational opportunities and dance competitions have helped maintain its presence worldwide. Europe hosts several international hip-hop dance competitions such as the UK B-Boy Championships, Juste Debout, and EuroBattle. Australia hosts a team-based competition called World Supremacy Battlegrounds and Japan hosts a two-on-two competition called World Dance Colosseum.

What distinguishes hip-hop from other forms of dance is that it is often "freestyle" (improvisational) in nature and hip-hop dance crews often engage in freestyle dance competitions—colloquially referred to as "battles". Crews, freestyling, and battles are identifiers of this style. Hip-hop dance can be a form of entertainment or a hobby. It can also be a way to stay active in competitive dance and a way to make a living by dancing professionally.

Hong 10

Hong 10 (Birth name: Kim Hong-Yeol, Korean: 김홍열, born on 18 February 1984 in South Korea) is a South Korean B-boy (also known as Breakdancer).

Icelandic hip hop

Icelandic hip hop is hip hop culture from Iceland, which includes hip hop music and rapping, breakdancing by b-girls and b-boys, and graffiti artists and graffiti writers. Early hip hop groups included Quarashi, Subterranean, Team 13 (which later became Twisted Minds), Multifunctionals, Oblivion, Bounce Brothers and Hip Hop Elements (later named Kritikal Mazz). The next generation of hip hop performers, notably BlazRoca and Sesar A rapped in Icelandic. XXX Rottweiler and Sesar A published the first all Icelandic hip hop albums in 2001. Subsequent artists included Bæjarins bestu, Móri, Afkvæmi Guðanna (The Offspring of the Gods), Bent og 7Berg (Bent and 7Berg), Skytturnar (The Marksmen), Hæsta Hendin (The Highest Hand) and Forgotten Lores. MGísli Palmi, Þriðja Hæðin (The Third Floor), Cell 7, Kilo, Shadez of Reykjavík, Úlfur Úlfur, and Emmsjé Gauti. Icelandic lyrics are usually very direct and aggressive, with battle raps. An important hip hop events is Rímnaflæði in Miðberg, a freestyle competition. Element Crew has been the leading B-boy crew since 1998. The graffiti scene started 1991 with graffiti writers such as ONE, Pharokees, Atom, Sharq, Kez and Youze.

Ken Swift

Ken Swift (born Kenneth James Gabbert) is a second generation B-boy, or breakdancer, and former Vice President of the Rock Steady Crew of which he was a longtime member and key figure. He is now President of the Breaklife and VII Gems Hip Hop movement in NYC. Ken Swift began B-Boying in 1978 at the age of twelve when he was inspired by dancers on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. Widely known in the B-Boy world as "the Epitome of a B-Boy," he is universally considered by B-Boys to be the individual who has had the greatest influence on break dancing. Ken Swift is credited with the creation of many dance moves. His original footwork and "freeze style" became a foundational part of breaking, which was considered new concepts at the time.Ken Swift has several film credits to his name, including Style Wars, the first Hip Hop documentary, and the first hip-hop major motion picture, Wild Style. His most famous movie was 1983's hit Flashdance, where his two-minute dance with several members of the Rock Steady Crew launched the Hip-Hop scene into national attention. Ken Swift also danced in the motion picture Beat Street.

List of PWG World Tag Team Champions

The PWG World Tag Team Championship is a professional wrestling world tag team championship owned and copyrighted by the Pro Wrestling Guerrilla (PWG) promotion; it is contested for in their tag team division. The championship was created and debuted on January 25, 2004, at PWG's Tango & Cash Invitational – Night Two event. Originally called the PWG Tag Team Championship, the title was renamed to the PWG World Tag Team Championship in February 2006 after the title was defended outside the United States for the first and second time, when that month then-champions Davey Richards and Super Dragon defeated Cape Fear (El Generico and Quicksilver) in Essen, Germany at European Vacation – Germany and Arrogance (Chris Bosh and Scott Lost) in Orpington, England at European Vacation – England. The championship was later won for the first time outside the United States on October 27, 2007, at PWG's European Vacation II – England event—at that event, then-champions El Generico and Kevin Steen were defeated by Richards and Super Dragon in Portsmouth, England. On June 16, 2017, Penta el Zero M and Rey Fenix successfully defended the title in Ciudad Nezahualcóyotl, Mexico.Title reigns are determined either by professional wrestling matches between different wrestlers involved in pre-existing scripted feuds and storylines, or by scripted circumstances. Wrestlers are portrayed as either villains or heroes as they follow a series of tension-building events, which culminate in a wrestling match or series of matches for the championship. All title changes happen at live events, which are released on DVD. The inaugural champions were B-Boy and Homicide, whom PWG recognized to have become the champions after defeating The American Dragon and Super Dragon in the finals of the Tango & Cash Invitational Tag Team Tournament on January 25, 2004, at PWG's Tango & Cash Invitational – Night Two event. As of March 2019, The Young Bucks (Matt and Nick Jackson) hold the record for most reigns, with four. Super Dragon holds the record for most reigns by a single competitor, with six. PWG publishes a list of successful championship defenses (victories against challengers for the championship) for each champion on their official website, unlike major professional wrestling promotions. As of March 2019, The Young Bucks (Matt and Nick Jackson) have the most defenses, with 15; Twelve teams are tied for having the least, with 0. At 631 days, The Young Bucks' (Matt and Nick Jackson) fourth reign is the longest in the title's history. The Unbreakable F'n Machines' (Brian Cage and Michael Elgin) only reign, Monster Mafia's (Ethan Page and Josh Alexander) only reign and the Beaver Boys' (Alex Reynolds and John Silver) only reign share the record for the shortest in the title's history at less than one day. Overall, there have been 36 reigns, among 38 different wrestlers and 27 different teams, and four vacancies.

Mind over Matter (Zion I album)

Mind Over Matter is the debut album from Oakland hip hop group Zion I. The effort was one of the most critically acclaimed underground Hip Hop albums of the year 2000, popular for their use of futuristic beats, live instrumentation and positive, socially conscious lyrics. Mind Over Matter was nominated for Independent Album of the Year by The Source in 2000. Their past singles "Inner Light" and "Critical" were featured here, as well as the single "Revolution (B-Boy Anthem)"'.

PWG World Tag Team Championship

The PWG World Tag Team Championship is a professional wrestling world tag team championship contested for in the tag team division of the Pro Wrestling Guerrilla (PWG) promotion. It was created and debuted on January 25, 2004, at PWG's Tango & Cash Invitational – Night Two event, where B-Boy and Homicide were crowned the inaugural champions.Being a professional wrestling championship, title reigns are not won legitimately; they are instead won via a scripted ending to a match or awarded to a wrestler because of a storyline. The title has been referred to as the PWG Tag Team Championship and as the PWG World Tag Team Championship since 2004. There have been a total of 36 reigns among 38 wrestlers and 27 teams. The current champions are The Rascalz (Zachary Wentz and Dezmond Xavier), who are in their first reign both individually and collectively.

Paul's Boutique

Paul's Boutique is the second studio album by the American hip hop group Beastie Boys, released on July 25, 1989, on Capitol Records. Featuring production by the Dust Brothers, the album was recorded in Matt Dike's apartment and the Record Plant in Los Angeles from 1988 to 1989, and mixed at the Record Plant. Remixes were made at the Manhattan-based Record Plant Studios. Aside from vocals, the album is almost completely composed of samples.

Paul's Boutique did not match the sales of the Beastie Boys' previous record, Licensed to Ill, and Capitol eventually stopped promoting it. However, its popularity grew and it has since been recognized as a breakthrough achievement. Varied lyrically and sonically, Paul's Boutique secured the Beastie Boys' place as critical favorites in the hip-hop genre. Often called the "Sgt. Pepper of hip-hop", the album's rankings near the top of many publications' "best albums" lists in disparate genres has given Paul's Boutique critical recognition as a landmark album in hip hop.On January 27, 1999, Paul's Boutique was certified double platinum in sales by the Recording Industry Association of America. In 2003, the album was ranked number 156 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. The album was re-released in a 20th anniversary package remastered in 24-bit audio and featuring a commentary track on January 27, 2009.

Planet B-Boy

Planet B-Boy is a 2007 documentary film that focuses on the 2005 Battle of the Year while also describing B-boy culture and history as a global phenomenon. This documentary was directed by Canadian-American Korean filmmaker Benson Lee, shot by Portuguese-American filmmaker Vasco Nunes, and released in theaters in the United States on March 21, 2008. It was released on DVD on November 11, 2008.

Rock Box

"Rock Box" is a 1984 hit single by Run–D.M.C.. It is the third single from their self-titled debut album, originally released through Profile Records, Inc. The heavy rock guitar riff and solos are original compositions performed by Eddie Martinez, also seen playing the electric guitar in the music video. DJ Jam Master Jay programmed the song's hip-hop beat. The single reached No. 26 on the Hot Dance Club Songs

UK B-Boy Championships

The UK B-Boy Championships is a hip-hop dance competition held annually in the United Kingdom. UK B-Boy Championships, alongside Battle of the Year and R-16 Korea, is regarded to be one of the main International B-Boy Championships held every year. There are national qualifiers worldwide where dancers compete for the opportunity to represent their country at the international final held in London. The event features solo breakers, poppers, hip-hop dancers and b-boy crews from across the globe. It also host DJs and graffiti artists from other countries.The Championships brings together dancers from around the globe—including the US, Japan, Korea, Russia, China, Holland and Scandinavia—who've won the preliminary tournaments. After a five-month search, staging eight international eliminations, the winners all converge at the Brixton Academy every year to take part in the international final. Since 2014, UK B-boy Championships partnered up with the World BBoy Series and helped create Undisputed, an event to crown the solo world bboy champion. In 2015, UK B-boy Championships was not held.

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