Avalon Books

Avalon Books was a small New York-based book publishing imprint active from 1950 through 2012, established by Thomas Bouregy.[1] Avalon was an important science fiction imprint in the 1950s and 60s; later its specialty was mystery and romance books.[2] The imprint was owned by Thomas Bouregy & Co., Inc..[1] It remained a family firm, with Thomas's daughter Ellen Bouregy Mickelsen taking over as publisher in 1995.[2]

On June 4, 2012 it was announced that Amazon.com had purchased the imprint and its back-list of about 3,000 titles. Amazon said it would publish the books through the various imprints of Amazon Publishing.[2]

Avalon Books
StatusDefunct
Founded1950
SuccessorAmazon Publishing
Country of originUnited States
Headquarters locationNew York
Official websitehttp://avalonbooks.com

Science fiction era

In the 1950s and 60s Avalon specialized in science fiction.[3] It issued much of the hardcover material in the genre during the period, particularly in the earlier portion. Avalon issued new titles, reissued out of print titles originally from other publishers, and first editions of material that had previously only seen magazine publication. Frederik Pohl jibed in 1959 that the publisher "seems to be pursuing a policy of printing the worst books by the best writers in science fiction".[4] Its books featured cover art by Ric Binkley, Ed Emshwiller (also known as Emsh), Gray Morrow, and Michael M. Peters. Later, competition with mainstream hardcover and paperback publishers starting their own science fiction lines and the marginal nature of genre publishing in general led to the line being discontinued.

Science fiction authors published by Avalon

Bibliography of Science Fiction books published (by year)

1953 (Bourgey/Curl)
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
  • Planet of Fear (Diane Detzer)
  • Polaris and the Immortals (Charles B. Stilson)
  • The Day the World Stopped (Stanton A. Coblentz)
  • The Return of the Starships (Jorge de Reyna)
  • The Stars Will Wait (Henry L. Hasse)
  • The Time of the Hedrons (Jack Dennis)

Mystery and Romance era

After the discontinuation of its science fiction line, Avalon specialized in mystery and romance books.[2]

Romance Authors published by Avalon Books[5]

  • Alayne Adams
  • Lois Carnell Alexander
  • Joye Ames
  • Jessica Andersen
  • Wendy May Andrews
  • Gina Ardito
  • Heidi Ashworth
  • Kat Attalla
  • Janet Avery
  • Susan Aylworth
  • Patricia K. Azeltine
  • Zelda Benjamin
  • Alison Blake
  • Amy Blizzard
  • Beate Boeker
  • Rebecca L. Boschee
  • Loretta Brabant
  • Sandra D. Bricker
  • Carolyn Brown
  • Mark Sydney Burk
  • Ludima Gus Burton
  • Christine Bush
  • Kaye Calkins
  • Carolann Camillo
  • Carolynn Carey
  • Kathy Carmichael
  • Margaret Carroll
  • Nell Carson
  • Sheila Claydon
  • Gena Cline
  • Karen Cogan
  • Janet Cookson
  • Annette Couch-Jareb
  • Tami Cowden
  • Connie Cox
  • Jillian Dagg
  • Sandra Dark
  • Patricia DeGroot
  • Roni Denholtz
  • Sierra Donovan
  • Laurie Alice Eakes
  • Glen Ebisch
  • Sandra Elzie
  • Rachel Evans (author)
  • Wilma Fasano
  • Sherry Lynn Ferguson
  • Shellie Foltz
  • Karen Frisch
  • Kathleen Fuller
  • Mike Gaherty
  • Shelly Galloway
  • Darlene Gardner
  • Carol Blake Gerrond
  • Sue Gibson
  • Theresa Goldstrand
  • Jean C. Gordon
  • Lacey Green
  • Sandi Haddad
  • Mary Hagen
  • Peggy Hansen
  • Cheryl Cooke Harrington
  • Amanda Harte
  • Pat Hines
  • Carolyn Hughey
  • Phyllis Humphrey
  • Carol Hutchens
  • Mona Ingram
  • Holly Jacobs
  • Jenny Jacobs
  • Noelene Jenkinson
  • Cheri Jetton
  • Victoria M. Johnson
  • Janet Kaderli
  • Veronica Kegel-Coon
  • Judy Kouzel
  • Linda Lattimer
  • Mary Leask
  • Georgie Lee
  • Sheryl Leonard
  • Sarita Leone
  • Ann LeValley
  • Cathy Liggett
  • Sandra Livingston
  • Kimberly Llewellyn
  • CJ Love
  • Judith Lown
  • Tracey J. Lyons
  • Gail MacMillan
  • Annette Mahon
  • Shirley Marks
  • Blanche Marriott
  • Beverly Martin-Lowry and Sue Boltz
  • Ellen Gray Massey
  • Carolyn Matkowsky
  • Debby Mayne
  • Ilsa Mayr
  • Jane McBride Choate
  • Elizabeth McBride
  • Cathy McDavid
  • Terry Zahniser McDermid
  • Shelagh McEachern
  • Kate McKeever
  • Jilliene McKinstry
  • Fran McNabb
  • Nicola Merrells
  • Barbara Meyers
  • Kathleen Mix
  • Lisa Mondello
  • Nancy Morgan
  • Jean Ann Moynahan
  • Rosemarie Naramore
  • Deborah Nolan
  • Anne Norman
  • Kim O'Brien
  • Rebecca K. O'Connor
  • Holly O'Dell
  • Gerry O'Hara
  • Dorothy P. O'Neill
  • Robin O'Neill
  • Linda L. Paisley
  • Nancy J. Parra
  • Alba Marie Pastorek
  • Jane Myers Perrine
  • Nikki Poppen
  • Marilyn Prather
  • Gaby Pratt
  • Bernadette Pruitt
  • Kathryn Quick
  • Susan Ralph
  • Tara Randel
  • Carol Reddick
  • Shirley Raye Redmond
  • Heather Reed
  • Sylvia Renfro
  • Sarah Richmond
  • Sheila Robins
  • Jeanne Robinson
  • Betsy Rogers
  • Elizabeth Rose
  • Jocelyn Saint James
  • JoAnn Sands
  • Lois Schwartz
  • Cynthia Scott
  • Stephanie Scott
  • Bev Sexton
  • Fran Shaff
  • Marilyn Shank
  • Elaine Shelabarger
  • Deborah Shelley
  • Mary Sheppard
  • Victoria Sheringham
  • Jennifer Shirk
  • Nadia Shworan
  • DeAnn Smallwood
  • Jeanette Sparks
  • Helen Spears
  • Constance Sprague
  • Angie Stanton
  • Christina Starr
  • Hazel Statham
  • Julie Stone
  • Norma Davis Stoyenoff
  • Marlene Stringer
  • Eva Swain
  • Teresa Swift
  • Mary Anne Taylor
  • Judi Thoman
  • Katrina Thomas
  • Liz Thompson
  • Lynn M. Turner
  • Joselyn Vaughn
  • Joan Vincent
  • Sydell Voeller
  • Suzanne Walter
  • Kim Watters
  • Heather S. Webber
  • Jan Weeks
  • Sandra Wilkins
  • Frances Engle Wilson
  • Helen Wingo
  • Donna Wright

References

  1. ^ a b "About Us". Avalon Books. Archived from the original on June 7, 2012. Retrieved June 4, 2012.
  2. ^ a b c d Julia Bosman (June 4, 2012). "Amazon Buys Avalon Books, Publisher in Romance and Mysteries". New York Times. Retrieved June 4, 2012.
  3. ^ AvalonBooks at ISFDB
  4. ^ "In the Balance", If, July 1959, p.99
  5. ^ Avalon Books. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-10-11. Retrieved 2012-08-28.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link) Avalon Books, 2012.
Big Planet

Big Planet is a science fiction novel by American writer Jack Vance. It is the first novel (the other being Showboat World) sharing the same setting, an immense, but metal-poor and backward world called Big Planet.

Big Planet was first published in Startling Stories (vol. 27 no. 2, September 1952), then cut and reissued in 1957 by Avalon Books. It was later issued as part of Ace double novel D-295, paired with Vance's Slaves of the Klau. It was further cut in 1958. The text was restored in 1978.

Collision Course (Silverberg novel)

Collision Course is a science fiction novel by American author Robert Silverberg, first published in hardcover in 1961 by Avalon Books and reprinted in paperback as an Ace Double later that year. Ace reissued it as a stand-alone volume in 1977 and 1982; a Tor paperback appeared in 1988. An Italian translation was also published in 1961, and a German translation later appeared. Silverberg planned the novel as a serial for Astounding Science Fiction, but John W. Campbell rejected the work and Silverberg eventually sold a shorter version to Amazing Stories, where it appeared in 1959.Collision Course details the response of the political leadership of Earth to an eventual collision of their aggressive expanding colonial empire with a newly discovered alien race.

Hidden World (novel)

Hidden World is a satiric science fiction novel by American writer Stanton A. Coblentz. It was originally published as a magazine serial in Wonder Stories (Mar, Apr, May 1935) as In Caverns Below. It was first published in book form in 1957 by Avalon Books.

Jason, Son of Jason

Jason, Son of Jason is a science fiction novel by John Ulrich Giesy. It was first published in book form in 1966 by Avalon Books. The novel was originally serialized in five parts in the magazine Argosy All-Story beginning in April 1921.

Kathleen Fuller

Kathleen Fuller (born September 11, 1967) is an American writer, specializing in Christian and Amish romantic fiction. She was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, grew up in Little Rock, Arkansas and currently resides in Geneva, Ohio with her husband, James Fuller, and three children.As a stay-at-home mother of three Kathleen Fuller became enamored with Christian fiction. She started writing in 2000, and a year after published her first short story. By 2003, she published her first novella, "Encore, Encore" and by 2004, Kathleen would release her first full-length novel, Santa Fe Sunrise under Avalon. Since then Kathleen has authored several short stories, novellas, novels, and some freelance non-fiction works.

Kathleen's break out year came when Thomas Nelson Publishers offered her several opportunities to write and participate in a series of Amish romance novels. In 2009, Kathleen's novel, A Man of His Word, was released and became a CBA and ECPA bestseller. Kathleen followed that with the successful release of the anthology An Amish Christmas featuring her novella "A Miracle for Miriam." The anthology would go on to become a CBD, CBA, and ECPA Bestseller.

Out of This World (Leinster book)

Out of This World is a collection of three related science fiction stories by Murray Leinster, published by Avalon Books in 1958. The stories, all featuring "hillbilly polymath" Bud Gregory, originally appeared in Thrilling Wonder Stories over a four-month span in 1947, and are sometimes characterized as a novel. A fourth story in the Gregory sequence, "The Seven Temporary Moons", was published in TWS in 1948, but has never been collected. All the stories originally carried the "William Fitzgerald" byline (a derivative of Leinster's birthname, Will F. Jenkins).

Palos of the Dog Star Pack

Palos of the Dog Star Pack is a science fiction novel by John Ulrich Giesy. It was first published in book form in 1965 by Avalon Books. The novel was originally serialized in five parts in the magazine All-Story Weekly beginning in July 1918.

Rachel Cosgrove Payes

Rachel Ruth Cosgrove Payes, also known as E.L. Arch and Joanne Kaye (11 December 1922, Westernport, Maryland – 10 October 1998, Brick Township, New Jersey) was an American genre novelist, and author of books on the Land of Oz.Born in Maryland to mine foreman Jacob A. Cosgrove and teacher Martha (née Brake), Cosgrove was educated at West Virginia Wesleyan College (B.S. 1943). Trained as a research biologist, she worked as a medical technologist at various hospitals. She married Norman Morris Payes in 1954; they had a son and daughter.Her first book, The Hidden Valley of Oz, was published by Reilly & Lee in 1951. Her second, The Wicked Witch of Oz (1954) was denied publication on the grounds that the Oz books were not selling. The book was published by The International Wizard of Oz Club in 1993. She had a tendency to dismiss adult Oz fans and insist that Oz books are "for kids!", a view she expressed in the documentary, Oz: The American Fairyland.

The bulk of Cosgrove's work consisted of historical romance novels, many published by Playboy Press, one under the name Joanne Kaye. She also wrote science fiction novels for Avalon Books under the name "E.L. Arch", an anagram of Rachel, as well as shorter sf and fantasy under her own name. Payes also wrote gothics, such as The Black Swan.

Solomon's Stone

Solomon's Stone is a fantasy novel by American writer L. Sprague de Camp. It was first published in the magazine Unknown Worlds in June 1942. It was reprinted in the Summer 1949 issue of the British edition of Unknown, and then published in book form by Avalon Books in 1957.After an unintentionally successful demon-summoning, accountant Prosper Nash finds himself on the astral plane, inhabiting the body of Jean-Prospere, Chevalier de Néche—the swashbuckling cavalier he likes to imagine himself as—and in by a New York filled with characters from similar wish-fulfillment daydreams of other mundane souls. The demon is possessing his body on a mundane plane, and he attempts to find his way back. This involves the Shamir, the Solomon's Stone of the title, and plentiful swashbuckling adventure, and a plot in which Prosper Nash's accounting abilities prove as useful as Chevalier de Néche's athletic ones.

The Duplicated Man

The Duplicated Man is a science fiction novel which was one of the first fictional works that tackle the idea of cloning. It was co-written by James Blish and Robert Lowndes. The Duplicated Man was first published in the August 1953 edition of Dynamic Science Fiction and in book form, in 1959 by Avalon Books.

The Glory That Was

The Glory That Was is a science fiction novel by American writer L. Sprague de Camp. It was first published in the science fiction magazine Startling Stories for April, 1952, and subsequently published in book form in hardcover by Avalon Books in 1960 and in paperback by Paperback Library in March 1971. It has since been reprinted in paperback by Ace Books in July 1979 and Baen Books in April 1992, and in trade paperback by Phoenix Pick in September 2014. An E-book edition was published by Gollancz's SF Gateway imprint on September 29, 2011 as part of a general release of de Camp's works in electronic form; a second e-book edition was issued by Phoenix Pick in September 2014. The book has also been translated into Italian, German and Greek.

The book is a tour de force for de Camp, bringing together features of several of the types of fiction he specialized in, including his time travel stories, historical novels, and trademark "domestic science fiction", in which ordinary people encounter the extraordinary—though as it turns out no time travel is involved, it is not a historical novel, and the "ordinary" people live in the twenty-seventh century.

Two of de Camp's friends and colleagues, science fiction writers Robert A. Heinlein and Isaac Asimov, with whom he had worked on military research during World War II, were involved in the book in different ways. It features a laudatory introduction by Heinlein and is dedicated to Asimov, whom de Camp stated "helped to push this one over the hump." Asimov recorded some vivid impressions of the author's research for the book in his own introduction to de Camp's short story collection The Continent Makers and Other Tales of the Viagens (1953).

The Green Magician

The Green Magician is a fantasy novella by American writers L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt. The fifth story in their Harold Shea series, it was first published in the November 1954 issue of the fantasy pulp magazine Beyond Fiction. It first appeared in book form, together with "The Wall of Serpents", in the collection Wall of Serpents, issued in hardcover by Avalon Books in 1960; the book has been reissued by a number of other publishers since. It has also been reprinted in various magazines, anthologies and collections, including The Dragon (June–July 1978), The Complete Compleat Enchanter (1989), Masterpieces of Fantasy and Enchantment (1988), and The Mathematics of Magic: The Enchanter Stories of L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt (2007). It has been translated into Italian and German.The Harold Shea stories are parallel world tales in which universes where magic works coexist with our own, and in which those based on the mythologies, legends, and literary fantasies of our world and can be reached by aligning one's mind to them by a system of symbolic logic. In The Green Magician, Shea visits his sixth such world, that of Irish myth.

The Hand of Zei

The Hand of Zei is a science fiction novel by American writer L. Sprague de Camp, the second book of his Viagens Interplanetarias series and its subseries of stories set on the fictional planet Krishna. The book has a convoluted publication history.

It was first published in the magazine Astounding Science Fiction as a four-part serial in the issues for October, 1950-January 1951. The text was redivided into two parts for its first publication in book form by Avalon Books, appearing as the separate volumes The Search for Zei (1962) and The Hand of Zei (1963). To facilitate the new division, de Camp wrote a new ending for the first and a new beginning for the second to briefly recapitulate the portion of the story already told. The two parts were then reissued together in paperback by Ace Books in 1963, back to back and inverted in relationship to each other, as an "Ace Double". The Ace versions were slightly abridged by the author. The first half of the novel was published in the UK by Compact Books as The Floating Continent in 1966. A restored text bringing both segments back together was finally published by Owlswick Press in 1981. A new paperback edition utilizing this text was issued by Ace Books in August 1982 as part of the standard edition of the Krishna novels, and was reprinted in March 1983. A later paperback edition was issued by Baen Books in March 1990. An E-book edition was published by Gollancz's SF Gateway imprint on September 29, 2011 as part of a general release of de Camp's works in electronic form. The novel has been translated into Dutch, French, German and Czech.As with all of the "Krishna" novels, the title of The Hand of Zei has a "Z" in it, a practice de Camp claimed to have devised to keep track of them. Short stories in the series do not follow the practice, nor do Viagens Interplanetarias works not set on Krishna.

The Languages of Pao

The Languages of Pao is a science fiction novel by American writer Jack Vance, first published in 1958, in which the Sapir–Whorf hypothesis is a central theme. A shorter version was published in Satellite Science Fiction in late 1957. After the Avalon Books hardcover appeared the next year, it was reprinted in paperback by Ace Books in 1966 and reissued in 1968 and 1974. Additional hardcover and paperback reprints have followed, as well as British, French and Italian editions.

The Mouthpiece of Zitu

The Mouthpiece of Zitu is a science fiction novel by John Ulrich Giesy. It was first published in book form in 1965 by Avalon Books. The novel was originally serialized in five parts in the magazine All-Story Weekly beginning in August 1919.

The Tower of Zanid

The Tower of Zanid is a science fiction novel by American writer L. Sprague de Camp, the sixth book of his Viagens Interplanetarias series and the fourth of its subseries of stories set on the fictional planet Krishna. Chronologically it is the seventh Krishna novel. It was first published in the magazine Science Fiction Stories for May 1958. It was first published in book form in hardcover by Avalon Books, also in 1958, and in paperback by Airmont Books in 1963. It has been reissued a number of times since by various publishers. For the later standard edition of Krishna novels it was published together with The Virgin of Zesh in the paperback collection The Virgin of Zesh & The Tower of Zanid by Ace Books in 1983. An E-book edition was published by Gollancz's SF Gateway imprint on September 29, 2011 as part of a general release of de Camp's works in electronic form. The novel has also been translated into Italian and German.

The Tower of Zanid was de Camp's last Krishna novel for a quarter century, the next one (The Hostage of Zir) not appearing until 1977.

As with all of the "Krishna" novels, the title of The Tower of Zanid has a "Z" in it, a practice de Camp claimed to have devised to keep track of them. Short stories in the series do not follow the practice, nor do Viagens Interplanetarias works not set on Krishna.

The Wall of Serpents

The Wall of Serpents is a fantasy novella by American science fiction and fantasy authors L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt. The fourth story in their Harold Shea series, it was first published in the June 1953 issue of the fantasy pulp magazine Fantasy Fiction. It first appeared in book form, together with its sequel, "The Green Magician", in the collection Wall of Serpents, issued in hardcover by Avalon Books in 1960; the book has been reissued by a number of other publishers since. It has also been reprinted in various anthologies and collections, including Great Short Novels of Adult Fantasy I (1972), The Complete Compleat Enchanter (1989), and The Mathematics of Magic: The Enchanter Stories of L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt (2007). It has been translated into Italian and German.

The Harold Shea stories are parallel world tales in which universes where magic works coexist with our own, and in which those based on the mythologies, legends, and literary fantasies of our world and can be reached by aligning one's mind to them by a system of symbolic logic. In The Wall of Serpents, Shea visits his fifth such world, that of the Finnish mythological epic poem the Kalevala.

Wall of Serpents

Wall of Serpents is a collection of two fantasy short stories by American science fiction and fantasy authors L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt, the third volume in their Harold Shea series. The pieces were originally published in the magazines Fantasy Fiction and Beyond Fantasy Fiction in the issues for June, 1953 and October, 1954. The collection was first published in hardcover by Avalon Books in 1960, with a new edition from Phantasia Press in 1978. The first paperback edition was published by Dell Books in 1979. A 1980 edition published by Sphere Books was retitled The Enchanter Compleated. An E-book edition was published by Gollancz's SF Gateway imprint on September 29, 2011 as part of a general release of de Camp's works in electronic form.The book has also been combined with the earlier books in the series in the omnibus edition The Complete Compleat Enchanter (1989), and with the earlier books and later stories in the omnibus edition The Mathematics of Magic: The Enchanter Stories of L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt (2007). It has also been published in Italian and German.

The Harold Shea stories are parallel world tales in which universes where magic works coexist with our own, and in which those based on the mythologies, legends, and literary fantasies of our world and can be reached by aligning one's mind to them by a system of symbolic logic. In the stories collected as Wall of Serpents, the authors' protagonist Harold Shea visits two such worlds, those of Finnish and Irish mythology.

Will Jacobs

Will Jacobs (born 1955) is an American comics and humor writer. He was a coauthor with Gerard Jones on The Beaver Papers, The Comic Book Heroes, and the comic book The Trouble with Girls (1987–1993). He was a contributor to National Lampoon magazine and various DC Comics. Jacobs left professional writing in the 1990s to start a used and antiquarian book service, Avalon Books. He co-wrote with Jones The Comic Book Heroes, a book dedicated to the history of the American comic book industry from the Silver Age to the present.In 2014 Jacobs and Jones began writing humorous fiction together again with The Beaver Papers 2 and My Pal Splendid Man.

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