Australian Defence Organisation

The Australian Defence Organisation (abbreviated as ADO and commonly referred to simply as Defence) is an Australian Government organisation that consists of both the Australian Defence Force (ADF) and the civilian Department of Defence personnel supporting the ADF whose two purposes are to "defend Australia and its national interests" and "protect and advance Australia's strategic interests".[5][6]

Australian Defence Organisation
Department of Defence (Australia) - Logo
Autriservice
Logo of the Department of Defence and the tri-service flag of the Australian Defence Force, the two organisations that constitute the Australian Defence Organisation
Agency overview
Formed9 February 1976
JurisdictionCommonwealth of Australia
HeadquartersCanberra
Employees168,037
Annual budgetA$34.6 billion (2017–18)[1]
Ministers responsible
Agency executives
Child agencies
Websitewww.defence.gov.au

Diarchy

The Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) and the Secretary of the Department of Defence (SECDEF) jointly manage the ADO under a diarchy and report directly to the Minister for Defence. The ADO diarchy is a governance structure unique in the Australian Commonwealth public service.[7]

Australian Defence Force

The Australian Defence Force is the armed forces of the Commonwealth of Australia led by the Chief of the Defence Force, currently General Angus Campbell and comprising the three uniformed services of the Royal Australian Navy, Australian Army and Royal Australian Air Force.[6]

Commanding the individual operations and duties of each service of the ADF are their respective heads: Chief of Navy Vice Admiral Michael Noonan, Chief of Army Lieutenant General Rick Burr, and Chief of Air Force Air Marshal Leo Davies. Each Chief manages the day-to-day executive operations of the services with both discretionary decision making authority and direction from the Chief of the Defence Force and the various Ministers of the defence portfolio and often cooperate with their counterparts from the other services as well as the Department of Defence.[6]

The Vice Chief of the Defence Force Group led by the Vice Chief of the Defence Force, currently Vice Admiral David Johnston, provides military strategic effects and commitments advice and planning, ADF cadet and reserve policy, joint capability coordination, and preparedness management.[6][8] The Joint Operations Command oversees all joint deployments of the Australian Defence Force and is commanded by the Chief of Joint Operations Air Marshal Mel Hupfeld. The Joint Capabilities Group provides joint military professional education and training, logistics support, health support and oversees the Joint Logistics Command, Joint Health Command, Australian Defence College, and the Information Warfare Division. The incumbent Chief of Joint Capabilities is Air Marshal Warren McDonald.[6]

Department of Defence

Russell Offices
The main offices of the Department of Defence and the Australian Defence Force's administrative headquarters are located in the Russell Offices complex in Canberra

The Department of Defence is one of the three original Australian government departments created at Federation of Australia in 1901. It is the Australian Public Service entity that provides advice, coordination, and program delivery for defence and military policy.

The Department of Defence also manages and oversees a range of public service and defence force agencies and organisations that deliver and develop the capabilities and services that support the Australian Defence Force. Such agencies include the Army and Air Force Canteen Service, the Defence Community Organisation, and Defence Housing Australia.

The Department also includes key groups including the Capability Acquisition and Sustainment Group, the Defence Science and Technology Group, and the Defence Strategic Policy and Intelligence Group (which oversees the Australian Signals Directorate, Defence Intelligence Organisation, and Australian Geospatial-Intelligence Organisation).

References

  1. ^ "Budget 2017–18 – Defence Budget Overview". www.minister.defence.gov.au. 9 May 2017. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d "Department of Defence Ministers". www.minister.defence.gov.au. 1 June 2019. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  3. ^ "Secretary of Defence". www.defence.gov.au/secretary. 1 June 2019. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  4. ^ "Chief of the Defence Force". www.defence.gov.au. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  5. ^ "Home : Department of Defence, Australian Government, Jobs, News, Operations". www.defence.gov.au. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  6. ^ a b c d e "Defence Organisational Structure Chart" (PDF). www.defence.gov.au. 18 January 2019. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  7. ^ 2016 Defence White Paper. Commonwealth of Australia. 2016. p. 83. ISBN 978-0-9941680-5-4.
  8. ^ Vice Chief of the Defence Force Group overview, www.defence.gov.au Archived 14 December 2016 at the Wayback Machine Alternative: http://www.defence.gov.au/VCDF/OrgChart.asp
Air Combat Group RAAF

The Royal Australian Air Force's Air Combat Group (ACG) is the group which administers the RAAF's fighter and bomber aircraft. ACG was formed on 7 February 2002 by merging the RAAF's Tactical Fighter Group and Strike Reconnaissance Group in an attempt to improve the speed with which the RAAF can deploy its combat aircraft. The current commander of ACG is Air Commodore Anthony Grady.

Since the Group's formation, ACG aircraft have deployed to Diego Garcia during Operation Slipper and formed part of the Australian contribution to the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ACG also worked on Operation Guardian II, which was the protection of the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting 2002, and on Operation Falconer, which was providing a larger ground crew and strike force in Iraq. Other tasks have included support for Operation Acolyte (Melbourne Commonwealth Games 2006) and participation in exercises such as Exercise Pitch Black in Australia and Exercise Red Flag in the United States. Aircraft from the Group have also performed domestic security tasks and participated in overseas exercises.

It comprises No. 78, No. 81 and No. 82 Wings. No. 78 Wing RAAF is headquartered at RAAF Williamtown. It commands No. 76 Squadron, based at RAAF Williamtown, No. 79 Squadron, based at RAAF Pearce, No. 2 Operational Conversion Unit, based at RAAF Williamtown, and No. 278 Squadron, which provides technical training specific to flight training. No. 81 Wing RAAF is headquartered at RAAF Williamtown. It commands No. 3 Squadron, based at RAAF Williamtown, No. 75 Squadron, based at RAAF Tindal, and No. 77 Squadron, based at RAAF Williamtown. No. 82 Wing RAAF is headquartered at RAAF Amberley. It commands No. 1 Squadron, based at RAAF Amberley, No. 6 Squadron, based at RAAF Amberley, and the Forward Air Control Development Unit (FACDU), based at RAAF Williamtown.

It is accountable for all of the Air Force's F/A-18 Hornet, Super Hornet and Hawk squadrons, as well as the PC-9A Forward Air Control aircraft. The ACG is equipped with McDonnell Douglas/Boeing F/A-18 Hornet/Super Hornet fighter and attack aircraft, BAE Hawk trainers and Pilatus P/C-9(A) forward air control training aircraft.

Anglesea Barracks

Anglesea Barracks is an Australian Defence Force barracks in central Hobart, Tasmania.

The site was chosen in December 1811 by Lachlan Macquarie and construction began on the first buildings to occupy the site in 1814. It is the oldest Australian Army barracks still in use and celebrated its bicentenary in December 2011.Despite the small variation in spelling it was named after Henry Paget, 1st Marquess of Anglesey who was involved with the Board of Ordnance.

Australian Defence Force

The Australian Defence Force (ADF) is the military organisation responsible for the defence of Australia. It consists of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), Australian Army, Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) and a number of 'tri-service' units. The ADF has a strength of just under 80,000 full-time personnel and active reservists, and is supported by the Department of Defence and several other civilian agencies.

During the first decades of the 20th century, the Australian Government established the armed services as separate organisations. Each service had an independent chain of command. In 1976, the government made a strategic change and established the ADF to place the services under a single headquarters. Over time, the degree of integration has increased and tri-service headquarters, logistics and training institutions have supplanted many single-service establishments.

The ADF is technologically sophisticated but relatively small. Although the ADF's 58,206 full-time active-duty personnel and 21,694 active reservists make it the largest military in Oceania, it is smaller than most Asian military forces. Nonetheless, the ADF is supported by a significant budget by worldwide standards and is able to deploy forces in multiple locations outside Australia.

Australian Intelligence Community

The Australian Intelligence Community (AIC) and the National Intelligence Community (NIC) or National Security Community of the Australian Government are the collectives of statutory intelligence agencies, policy departments, and other government agencies concerned with protecting and advancing the national security and national interests of the Commonwealth of Australia. The intelligence and security agencies of the Australian Government have evolved since the Second World War and the Cold War and saw transformation and expansion during the Global War on Terrorism with military deployments in Afghanistan, Iraq and against ISIS in Syria. Key international and national security issues for the Australian Intelligence Community include terrorism and violent extremism, cybersecurity, transnational crime, the rise of China, and Pacific regional security.The National Security Committee of Cabinet (NSC) is a Cabinet committee and the peak Australian Government decision-making body for national security, intelligence, foreign policy, and defence matters. It is chaired by the Prime Minister and is composed of the Deputy Prime Minister, Attorney-General, Treasurer, Minister for Foreign Affairs, Minister for Defence, and Minister for Home Affairs.

Capability management

Capability management is a high-level integrative management function, with particular application in the context of defense.

Chief Capability Development Group

The Chief of Capability Development Group (CCDG) was head of the Capability Development Group (CDG) in the Australian Department of Defence, part of the Australian Defence Organisation. This position was created in December 2003 and disbanded through the amalgamation of the Capability Development Group and the Defence Materiel Organisation into the Defence Capability Acquisition and Sustainment Group from 2015.

The appointed officer was responsible to the diarchy of the Chief of the Defence Force and the Secretary of Defence.

Chief of Joint Capabilities

The Chief of Joint Capabilities (CJC) is the head of the Joint Capabilities Group (JCG) in the Australian Department of Defence, part of the Australian Defence Organisation. This position was created on 1 July 2017. The current chief is Air Marshal Warren McDonald.

Chief of Joint Operations (Australia)

The Chief of Joint Operations (CJOPS) is a three-star role within the Australian Defence Force (ADF), responsible the Joint Operations Command and joint operational deployments, such as United Nations peacekeeping and joint task groups. Until 2007, the Vice Chief of the Defence Force (VCDF) was double hatted, additionally exercising the responsibilities of CJOPS. However, in September 2007 the Minister of Defence, Brendan Nelson announced the formation of a separate CJOPS position based at the Headquarters Joint Operations Command (HQJOC) at Bungendore, New South Wales.

Chief of the Defence Force (Australia)

The Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) is the professional head of the Australian Defence Force (ADF) and the most senior uniformed military adviser to the Minister for Defence. The current Chief of the Defence Force is General Angus Campbell, who took office on 6 July 2018.

Current senior Australian Defence Organisation personnel

The Australian Defence Organisation (ADO) is composed of the armed forces of the Commonwealth of Australia, the Australian Defence Force (ADF), and the Australian Public Service government department, the Department of Defence which is composed of a range of civilian support organisations.

The Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) leads the Australian Defence Force and the Secretary of Defence leads the Department of Defence though both jointly manage the Australian Defence Organisation under a diarchy, and both report directly to the Minister for Defence.

The highest active rank in the Australian Defence Force is reserved for the Chief of the Defence Force. This is a four-star rank and the CDF is the only Australian military officer at that level. As a result of the diarchy, the Secretary of the Department of Defence is of the equivalent civilian four-star level in the Senior Executive Service of the Australian Public Service.

Defence Strategic Policy and Intelligence Group

The Defence Strategic Policy and Intelligence Group (SP&I) of the Australian Government Department of Defence is responsible for defence diplomacy, strategic policy, international security, and military intelligence co-ordination and advice to the Prime Minister of Australia, Minister for Defence, Secretary of the Department of Defence, and Chief of the Defence Force. The Defence Strategic Policy and Intelligence Group is led by the Deputy Secretary for Strategic Policy and Intelligence and comprises three policy divisions and two intelligence agencies.

The Group has existed in various forms since the Cold War within the Department of Defence with responsibilities for defence policy, strategy, intelligence, and international policy. It has been known as the Defence Strategy and Intelligence Group, the Defence Strategy Executive, the Defence Intelligence and Security Group, the Defence Intelligence, Security and International Policy Group, and the Defence Intelligence Group. The current SP&I Group was established on 8 February 2016 as a key recommendation of the First Principles Review of the Australian Defence Organisation, integrating all policy, strategy and intelligence functions of the Australian Government Department of Defence.The Deputy Secretary for Strategic Policy and Intelligence can be seen as the Australian combined equivalent of the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence and the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy of the United States Department of Defense.

Department of Defence (Australia)

The Department of Defence is a department of the Government of Australia charged with the responsibility to defend Australia and its national interests. Along with the Australian Defence Force (ADF), it forms part of the Australian Defence Organisation (ADO) and is accountable to the Commonwealth Parliament, on behalf of the Australian people, for the efficiency and effectiveness with which it carries out the Government's defence policy.

The head of the Department, who leads it on a daily basis, is the Secretary of the Department of Defence (SECDEF), currently Greg Moriarty. The Secretary reports to the Minister of Defence, currently The Hon. Linda Reynolds MP, following appointment by Prime Minister Scott Morrison in May 2019.

Minister for Defence (Australia)

The Minister for Defence is the principal minister responsible for the organisation, implementation, and formulation of government policy in defence and military matters for the Australian Government. The individual who holds this office directs the governments approach to such matters through the Australian Defence Organisation and, by extension, the Department of Defence and the Australian Defence Force. The office of the Minister for Defence, like all Cabinet positions, is not referenced in the Constitution of Australia but rather exists through convention and the right of the Governor-General to appoint ministers of state.As the Minister for Defence is responsible for the executive management of Australia's defence and military forces and the portfolio's accountability to the Parliament, the Secretary of Defence is required under section 63(1) of the Public Service Act 1999 and the Requirements for Annual Reports from the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Public Accounts and Audit to submit a report to the responsible ministers on the activities of the Department of Defence after the end of each financial year for presentation to the Parliament.On 26 May 2019, Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced that Linda Reynolds would lead the Defence portfolio as Minister in the Second Morrison Ministry. The previous Minister, Christopher Pyne, resigned from the Parliament and did not contest his seat in the House of Representatives for the 2019 federal election.Since 1996, there has been a succession of Defence Ministers who have lasted for less than five years. In contrast, the two previous Defence Ministers prior to 1996, Kim Beazley and Robert Ray, have each served for over five years.

National Intelligence Coordination Committee

The National Intelligence Coordination Committee (NICC) is a peak intergovernmental officials-level body of the Government of Australia responsible for the development and co-ordination of the Australian Intelligence Community in accordance with the National Security Committee of Cabinet. The NICC is chaired by the Director-General of the Office of National Intelligence.The United Kingdom Joint Intelligence Committee and the United States Office of the Director of National Intelligence have similar but not analogous functions as the NICC.

National Security Committee (Australia)

The National Security Committee of Cabinet (NSC) is the peak decision-making body for national security of the Commonwealth of Australia. It is a committee of the Australian Government Cabinet of Ministers though decisions of the NSC do not require the endorsement of the Cabinet.The NSC has similar but not analogous functions as the United States National Security Council and the United Kingdom National Security Council.

Paul Dibb

Paul Dibb AM (born 3 October 1939) is an English-born Australian strategist, academic and former defence intelligence official. He is currently emeritus professor of strategic studies at the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre which is part of the Australian National University.He was the head of the National Assessments Staff (the predecessor to the Office of National Assessments) from 1974 to 1978, the director of the Joint Intelligence Organisation (the predecessor to the Defence Intelligence Organisation) from 1986 to 1988, and the head of the Defence Strategy and Intelligence Group with the rank of Deputy Secretary in the Department of Defence from 1988 to 1991. Dibb is also known for his contribution to Australian defence strategy through writing the 1986 Review of Australia’s defence capabilities, known as the Dibb Report, and being the primary author of the 1987 Defence White Paper. From 1965 to 1984, Dibb worked for the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation, tasked with gaining intelligence and recruiting KGB and GRU agents in Canberra.

Russell Offices

The Russell Offices is a complex of office buildings located in the Canberra suburb of Russell. Parking in the precinct is controlled by the National Capital Authority.

Together with Campbell Park, these two complexes are home to the Australian Department of Defence and contain the administrative headquarters of the Australian Defence Force. The buildings in the complex are informally referred to as R1, R2 and so forth. R1-R4 are clustered together in the centre of the complex, R5-R7 are clustered at the north, while R8 and R9 are together at the south.

The Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO) was located at Russell until their move into the Ben Chifley Building in July 2013.

The Australian Signals Directorate (ASD) occupies Building 5 (R5) and Building 6 (R6) and their annex. Upgrade works costing an estimated $75M were put to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works in March 2017. The project is in the Department of Defence budget.

The Australian Geospatial-Intelligence Organisation (AGO) is located in Building 4 (R4).

Senior Australian Defence Organisation Positions

The Australian Defence Organisation (ADO) is composed of the armed forces of the Commonwealth of Australia, the Australian Defence Force (ADF), and the Australian Public Service government department, the Department of Defence which is composed of a range of civilian support organisations.

The Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) leads the Australian Defence Force and the Secretary of Defence leads the Department of Defence though both jointly manage the Australian Defence Organisation under a diarchy, and both report directly to the Minister for Defence.

The highest active rank in the Australian Defence Force is reserved for the Chief of the Defence Force. This is a four-star rank and the CDF is the only Australian military officer at that level. As a result of the diarchy, the Secretary of the Department of Defence is of the equivalent civilian four-starlevel in the Senior Executive Service of the Australian Public Service.

Leadership
Structure
Branches
Leadership
Structure
Personnel
& Training
Intelligence
Strategy
Equipment
Installations
Culture
History
Leadership of the Australian Defence Organisation
Australian Defence Organisation
Australian Defence Force
Royal Australian Navy
Australian Army
Royal Australian Air Force
Department of Defence
Command
Organisation
Ships and
Equipment
Installations
Personnel
Current
Operations
History
Other
Former
Entities
Structure
Installations
Equipment
Personnel
Culture
History
Corps and
Regiments
Leadership
Personnel
Structure
Operations
Equipment
Installations
History
Culture
History
Geography
Politics
Economy
Society
Militaries of Asia
Sovereign states
States with limited recognition
Dependencies and other territories

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.