Augsburg

Augsburg (German pronunciation: [ˈaʊ̯ksbʊʁk] (listen); Austro-Bavarian: Augschburg) is a city in Swabia, Bavaria, Germany. It is a university town and regional seat of the Regierungsbezirk Schwaben. Augsburg is an urban district and home to the institutions of the Landkreis Augsburg. It is the third-largest city in Bavaria (after Munich and Nuremberg) with a population of 300,000 inhabitants, with 885,000 in its metropolitan area.[2]

After Neuss and Trier, Augsburg is Germany's third oldest city, founded in 15 BC by the Romans as Augusta Vindelicorum, named after the Roman emperor Augustus. It was a Free Imperial City from 1276 to 1803 and the home of the patrician Fugger and Welser families that dominated European banking in the 16th century. The city played a leading role in the Reformation as the site of the 1530 Augsburg Confession and 1555 Peace of Augsburg. The Fuggerei, the oldest social housing complex in the world, was founded in 1513 by Jakob Fugger.

Augsburg
Augsburg - Markt
Maximilianmuseum
Gasse in der Fuggerei, Augsburg
Der Hohe Dom zu AugsburgDSC 2136
Flag of Augsburg

Flag
Coat of arms of Augsburg

Coat of arms
Location of Augsburg
Augsburg is located in Germany
Augsburg
Augsburg
Augsburg is located in Bavaria
Augsburg
Augsburg
Coordinates: 48°22′N 10°54′E / 48.367°N 10.900°ECoordinates: 48°22′N 10°54′E / 48.367°N 10.900°E
CountryGermany
StateBavaria
Admin. regionSwabia
DistrictUrban district
Government
 • Lord MayorKurt Gribl (CSU)
Area
 • Total146.84 km2 (56.70 sq mi)
Elevation
494 m (1,621 ft)
Population
 (2017-12-31)[1]
 • Total292,851
 • Density2,000/km2 (5,200/sq mi)
Time zoneCET/CEST (UTC+1/+2)
Postal codes
86150–86199
Dialling codes0821
Vehicle registrationA
Dr Kurt Gribl2
Lord Mayor Kurt Gribl, 2010

Geography

Augsburg lies at the convergence of the Alpine rivers Lech and Wertach and on the Singold. The oldest part of the city and the southern quarters are on the northern foothills of a high terrace, which emerged between the steep rim of the hills of Friedberg in the east and the high hills of the west. In the south extends the Lechfeld, an outwash plain of the post ice age between the rivers Lech and Wertach, where rare primeval landscapes were preserved. The Augsburg city forest and the Lech valley heaths today rank among the most species-rich middle European habitats.[3]

On Augsburg borders the nature park Augsburg Western Woods - a large forestland. The city itself is also heavily greened. As a result, in 1997 Augsburg was the first German city to win the Europe-wide contest Entente Florale for Europe's greenest and most livable city.

View of Augsburg, from the west
View of Augsburg, from the west

Suburb and Neighbouring municipalities

Augsburg is surrounded by the counties Landkreis Augsburg in the west and Aichach-Friedberg in the east.

The Suburb are Friedberg, Königsbrunn, Stadtbergen, Neusäß, Gersthofen, Diedorf

Neighbouring municipalities:Rehling, Affing, Kissing, Mering, Merching, Bobingen, Gessertshausen

History

Early history

Augsburg map 1705-1720
Early 18th century map of Augsburg and surrounding area

The city was founded in 15 BC by Drusus and Tiberius as Augusta Vindelicorum (Latin pronunciation: [awˈɡʊsta wɪndɛlɪˈkoːrʊ̃] English pronunciation of Latin: /aʊˈɡuːstə vɪnˈdɛlɪˌkoʊrəm/[4]), on the orders of their stepfather Emperor Augustus. The name means "Augusta of the Vindelici". This garrison camp soon became the capital of the Roman province of Raetia.

Early development was due to a 400-year affiliation with the Roman Empire, especially because of its excellent military, economic and geographic position at the convergence of the Alpine rivers Lech and Wertach, and with direct access to most important Alpine passes. Thus, Augsburg was the intersection of many important European east-west and north-south connections, which later evolved as major trade routes of the Middle Ages.[5]

Around 120 AD Augsburg became the capital of the Roman province Raetia. Augsburg was sacked by the Huns in the 5th century AD, by Charlemagne in the 8th century, and by Welf of Bavaria in the 11th century, but arose each time to greater prosperity.

Augsburg Confession

Mixed Imperial City of Augsburg

Paritätische Reichsstadt Augsburg
1276–1803
(Occupied by Sweden 1632–35)
Coat of arms of Augsburg before 1985 of Augsburg
Coat of arms of Augsburg before 1985
StatusMixed Imperial City
(State of the Holy Roman Empire)
CapitalAugsburg
GovernmentRepublic
Historical eraMiddle Ages
• Bishopric established
4th century
c. 888
• City gained immediacy
1276
1530
• Joined Schmalkadic League
1537
• Peace of Augsburg
1555
• Occupied by Sweden
1632–35
1803
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Prince-Bishopric of Augsburg
Kingdom of Bavaria

Augsburg was granted the status of a Free Imperial City on March 9, 1276 and from then until 1803, it was independent of its former overlord, the Prince-Bishop of Augsburg. Frictions between the city-state and the prince-bishops were to remain frequent however, particularly after Augsburg became Protestant and curtailed the rights and freedoms of Catholics.

With its strategic location at an intersection of trade routes to Italy, the Free Imperial City became a major trading center. Augsburg produced large quantities of woven goods, cloth and textiles. Augsburg became the base of two banking families that rose to great prominence, the Fuggers and the Welsers. The Fugger family donated the Fuggerei part of the city devoted to housing for needy citizens in 1516, which remains in use today.

Nuremberg chronicles - Augusta vendilicorum
Panorama of Augsburg, 1493
Augsburg1550
Perlach market place in 1550.

In 1530, the Augsburg Confession was presented to the Holy Roman Emperor at the Diet of Augsburg. Following the Peace of Augsburg in 1555, after which the rights of religious minorities in imperial cities were to be legally protected, a mixed Catholic–Protestant city council presided over a majority Protestant population; see Paritätische Reichsstadt.

Thirty Years' War

Religious peace in the city was largely maintained despite increasing Confessional tensions until the Thirty Years' War (1618–1648). In 1629, Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand II issued the Edict of Restitution, which restored the legal situation of 1552 and again curtailed the rights of the Protestant citizens. The inequality of the Edict of Restitution was rescinded when in April 1632, the Swedish army under Gustavus Adolphus captured Augsburg without resistance.

In 1634, the Swedish army was routed at nearby Nördlingen. By October 1634, Catholic troops had surrounded Augsburg. The Swedish garrison refused to surrender and a siege ensued through the winter of 1634/35 and thousands died from hunger and disease. According to J. N. Hays, "In the period of the Swedish occupation and the Imperial siege the population of the city was reduced from about 70,000 to about 16,000, with typhus and plague playing major roles."[6]

Nine Years' War

In 1686, Emperor Leopold I formed the League of Augsburg, termed by the English as the "Grand Alliance" after England joined in 1689: a European coalition, consisting (at various times) of Austria, Bavaria, Brandenburg, England, the Holy Roman Empire, the Palatinate of the Rhine, Portugal, Savoy, Saxony, Spain, Sweden, and the United Provinces. It was formed to defend the Palatinate from France. This organization fought against France in the Nine Years War.

Augsburg's peak boom years occurred during the 15th and 16th centuries thanks to the bank and metal businesses of the merchant families Fugger and Welser, who held a local near total monopoly on their respective industries. Augsburg's wealth attracted artists seeking patrons and rapidly became a creative centre for famous painters, sculptors and musicians - and, notably, the birthplace of the Holbein painter family. In later centuries the city was the birthplace of the composer Leopold Mozart[7] and the playwright Berthold Brecht.[8] Rococo became so prevalent that it became known as “Augsburg style” throughout Germany.

End of Free Imperial City status and Industrial Revolution revival

Stockdale 1800 - Augsburg.jpeg
A map of Augsburg in 1800.

In 1806, when the Holy Roman Empire was dissolved, Augsburg lost its independence and was annexed to the Kingdom of Bavaria. In 1817, the city became an administrative capital of the Oberdonaukreis, then administrative capital in 1837 for the district Swabia and Neuburg.

During the end of the 19th century, Augsburg's textile industry again rose to prominence followed by the connected machine manufacturing industry.

Military

Augsburg was historically a militarily important city due to its strategic location. During the German re-armament before the Second World War, the Wehrmacht enlarged Augsburg's one original Kaserne (barracks) to three: Somme Kaserne (housing Wehrmacht Artillerie-Regiment 27); Arras Kaserne (housing Wehrmacht Infanterie Regiment 27) and Panzerjäger Kaserne (housing Panzerabwehr-Abteilung 27 (later Panzerjäger-Abteilung 27)). Wehrmacht Panzerjäger-Abteilung 27 was later moved to Füssen.

During World War II, one subcamp of the Dachau concentration camp was located outside Augsburg, supplying approximately 1,300 forced labourers to local military-related industry, most especially the Messerschmitt AG military aircraft firm headquartered in Augsburg.[9][10]

In 1941, Rudolf Hess without Adolf Hitler's permission secretly took off from a local Augsburg airport and flew to Scotland to meet the Duke of Hamilton, and crashed in Eaglesham in an attempt to mediate the end of the European front of World War II and join sides for the upcoming Russian Campaign.

The Reichswehr Infanterie Regiment 19 was stationed in Augsburg and became the base unit for the Wehrmacht Infanterie Regiment 40, a subsection of the Wehrmacht Infanterie Division 27 (which later became the Wehrmacht Panzerdivision 17). Elements of Wehrmacht II Battalion of Gebirgs-Jäger-Regiment 99 (especially Wehrmacht Panzerjäger Kompanie 14) was composed of parts of the Wehrmacht Infanterie Division 27. The Infanterie Regiment 40 remained in Augsburg until the end of the war, finally surrendering to the United States when in 28 April 1945, the U.S. Army occupied the heavily bombed and damaged city.

Following the war, the three Kaserne would change hands confusingly between the American and Germans, finally ending up in US hands for the duration of the Cold War. The former Wehrmacht Kaserne became the three main US barracks in Augsburg: Reese, Sheridan and FLAK. US Base FLAK had been an anti-aircraft barracks since 1936 and US Base Sheridan "united" the former infantry barracks with a smaller Kaserne for former Luftwaffe communications units.

The American military presence in the city started with the U.S. 5th Infantry Division stationed at FLAK Kaserne from 1945 to 1955, then by 11th Airborne Division, followed by the 24th Infantry Division, U.S. Army VII Corps artillery, USASA Field Station Augsburg and finally the 66th Military Intelligence Brigade, which returned the former Kaserne to German hands in 1998. Originally the Heeresverpflegungshauptamt Südbayern and an Officers' caisson existed on or near the location of Reese-Kaserne, but was demolished by the occupying Americans.

Politics

Municipality

From 1266 until 1548, the terms Stadtpfleger (head of town council) and Mayor were used interchangeably, or occasionally, simultaneously. In 1548 the title was finally fixed to Stadtpfleger, who officiated for several years and was then awarded the title for life (though no longer governing), thus resulting confusingly, in records of two or more simultaneous Stadtpfleger.

After the transfer to Bavaria in 1806, Augsburg was ruled by a Magistrate with two mayors, supported by an additional council of "Community Commissioners": the Gemeindebevollmächtige.

As of 1907, the Mayor was entitled Oberbürgermeister, as Augsburg had reached a population of 100,000, as per the Bavarian Gemeindeordnung.

Town Council

Election results of the Town Council since 1972 in percent[11]
Year CSU SPD FDP Grüne ÖDP Linke REP NPD Pro Augsburg AfD other
1972 44,9 46,5 2,3 0,7 0,9 4,7
1978 46,8 44,5 2,7 0,4 0,6 4,9
1984 32,9 44,9 1,3 4,2 0,2 0,7 15,8
1990 43,1 28,4 2,5 10,8 10,0 5,2
1996 44,1 29,4 1,7 10,5 2,8 11,5
2002 43,5 36,4 3,5 8,7 1,8 1,2 4,9
2008 40,1 30,1 2,7 10,3 1,5 3,5 9,4 2,4
2014[12] 37,7 22,4 1,6 12,4 1,9 3,2 5,1 5,9 9,6
Seats
2014
23 13 1 7 1 2 3 4 62

12002 PDS, until 1984 DKP    2Christlich Soziale Mitte (CSM): 3, Freie Wähler: 2, Polit-WG e.V: 1

Members of the Bundestag

Augsburg is located in the Wahlkreis 253 Augsburg-Stadt constituency, which includes Königsbrunn and parts of the District of Augsburg (Landkreis Augsburg).

Volker Ullrich of the CSU was directly elected to the Bundestag in the 18th German Bundestag.

Indirectly elected to the Bundestag to adhere to the Landesliste were Ulrike Bahr for the SPD and Claudia Roth for Bündnis 90/Die Grünen.[13]

Climate

Augsburg has a oceanic climate (Köppen climate classification: Cfb) or, following the 0 °C isotherm, a humid continental climate (Dfb).

Main sights

Augsburg - Markt
Augsburg Town Hall and Perlachturm (left)
Herrengasse, Fuggerei, Augsburg
The Fuggerei
Augsburg Fuggerhaeuser Stadtpalast
Fugger's City Palace
  • Town Hall, built in 1620 in Renaissance style with the Goldener Saal
  • Perlachturm, a bell tower built in 989
  • Fuggerei, the oldest social housing estate in the world, inhabited since 1523
  • Fuggerhäuser(Fugger houses), restored renaissance palatial homes of the Fugger banking family
  • Bishop's Residence, built about 1750 in order to replace the older bishop's palace; today the administrative seat of Swabia
  • Cathedral, founded in the 9th century
  • St. Anne's Church
  • Augsburg Synagogue, one of the few German synagogues to survive the war, now beautifully restored and open with a Jewish museum inside
  • Augsburg textile and industry museum-or just tim, organises it displays under headings Mensch-Maschine-Muster-Mode.
  • Schaezlerpalais, a Rococo mansion (1765) now housing a major art museum
  • St. Ulrich and St. Afra—one church is Roman Catholic, the other Lutheran, the duality being a result of the Peace of Augsburg concluded in 1555 between Catholics and Protestants
  • Mozart Haus Augsburg (where composer's father Leopold Mozart was born and Mozart visited it several times)
  • Augsburger Puppenkiste, a puppet theatre
  • Luther Stiege, museum located in a church, that shows Martin Luthers life and different rooms. (free admission)
  • Eiskanal, the world's first artificial whitewater course (venue for the whitewater events of the 1972 Munich Olympics)
  • Dorint Hotel Tower
  • Childhood home of Bertolt Brecht
  • The Augsburg Botanical Gardens (Botanischer Garten Augsburg)
  • Maximillian Museum
  • Bahnpark Augsburg home of 29 historic locomotives, blacksmith, historic roundhouse
  • 3 magnificent renaissance fountains, the Agustus Fountain, Mercury Fountain and Hercules Fountain from 15th century, build for the 1500 anniversary of city foundation
  • Walter Art Museum at the "Glas-Palace"
  • Roman Museum located in the former Monastery of St. Margaret (closed at the moment due to risk of collapsing). Renovation is taking place and the museum is expected to reopen in 2017.[14]
  • Medieval canals, used to run numerous industries, medieval arms production, silver art, sanitation and water pumping
  • Kulturhaus Abraxas
Fuenfgratturm1

Fünfgratturm tower

Germany Augsburg Dom-St-Maria Door Handle

Ring of Mercy on the Dom (Cathedral) St. Maria

Augsburg Synagoge

Augsburg Synagogue

Augsburg - st ulrich u afra

St. Ulrich and St. Afra Cathedral

Urban Legends

Stoinernerma
The „Stoinerne Ma“
Augsburg Sieben Kindeln
Bei den sieben Kindeln

City goddess Cisa

Allegedly Cisa (dea Ciza) was the city goddess of Augsburg. A representation of the Cisa can be seen on the weather vane of the Perlachturm; moreover, according to legend, some representations on the bronze doors of the cathedral are said to indicate the goddess. The mountain on which her temple is said to have stood was called "Zisenberk".[15] The golden vane on top of Perlach-Tower next to city hall is the original likeness of the goddess from the 15th century.

The Stoinerne Ma

The "Stoinerne Ma" ("Stony Man") is a life-size stone figure on the eastern Augsburg city wall in the area of the so-called "Sweden staircase", which is located in the immediate vicinity of the Galluskirche and St. Stephan convent (on the outside of the city wall). It is probably a one-armed baker with a loaf of bread and a shield. In the area of the feet there is a helically twisted pedestal.

According to the legend, it is the baker "Konrad Hackher" who, during a long siege of the city, baked bread from sawdust and threw it into the ditch clearly visible for the besiegers over the city wall. The impression that Augsburg would still have so much bread that one could throw it over the wall is said to have demoralized the besiegers so much that they fired at him with a crossbow out of anger. A hit struck off his arm, and soon afterwards the siege was broken off. Historically, the event belongs to the Thirty Years' War, more precisely to the siege of Augsburg during the years 1634/35, when Catholic Bavarian troops under Field Marshal von Wahl wanted to recapture the city occupied by the Protestant Swedes. Of course, the baker's deed is not reliably proven.

The statue is often visited by walkers strolling along the city wall. As it is said to be a fortunate thing to touch the stone figure's iron nose. This custom is particularly popular with lovers.

In the wall of the property Bei den Sieben Kindeln 3 ("At the seven infants 3") there is a recessed stone relief from the Roman period depicting six playing, naked children standing around a coffin.

Legend says that the commemorative plaque was commissioned by a Roman officer to commemorate the drowning of one of his children (therefore it is said to be "seven" children, although the plaque represents only six: the seventh child is drowned and lies in the coffin). According to current knowledge, the plate once formed the long side of a Sarcophagus, representing Erotes.

Incorporations

Year Municipality Area
July 1, 1910 Meringerau 9.5 km2
January 1, 1911 Pfersee 3.5 km2
January 1, 1911 Oberhausen 8.6 km2
January 1, 1913 Lechhausen 27.9 km2
January 1, 1913 Hochzoll 4.4 km2
April 1, 1916 Kriegshaber 59 km2
July 1, 1972 Göggingen
July 1, 1972 Haunstetten
July 1, 1972 Inningen

Population

Historical development

Year Population
1635 16,432
1645 19,960
1806 26,200
1830 29,019
December 1, 1871 ¹ 51,220
December 1, 1890 ¹ 75,629
December 1, 1900 ¹ 89,109
December 1, 1910 ¹ 102,487
June 16, 1925 ¹ 165,522
June 16, 1933 ¹ 176,575
May 17, 1939 ¹ 185,369
September 13, 1950 ¹ 185,183
June 6, 1961 ¹ 208,659
May 27, 1970 ¹ 211,566
June 30, 1975 252,000
June 30, 1980 246,600
June 30, 1985 244,200
May 27, 1987 ¹ 242,819
December 31, 1990 256.877
December 31, 1991 259.884
December 31, 1992 264.852
December 31, 1993 264.764
December 31, 1994 262.110
December 31, 1995 259.699
December 31, 1996 258.457
December 31, 1997 256.625
December 31, 1998 254.610
December 31, 1999 254.867
December 31, 2000 254.982
December 31, 2001 257.836
December 31, 2002 259.231
December 31, 2003 259.217
December 31, 2004 260.407
December 31, 2005 262.676
December 31, 2006 262.512
December 31, 2007 262.992
December 31, 2008 263.313
December 31, 2009 263.646
December 31, 2010 264.708
December 31, 2011 266.647
December 31, 2015 281.111
December 31, 2017 295.895

¹ Census result

Largest groups of foreign residents[16]
Nationality Population (31.12.2017)
 Turkey 11,701
 Romania 7,242
 Italy 4,280
 Croatia 4,123
 Poland 2,581
 Syria 2,392
 Iraq 2,369
 Greece 2,129
 Hungary 1,907
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 1,823
 Russia 1,746
 Kosovo 1,650
 Bulgaria 1,639
 Ukraine 1,512
 Serbia 1,312
 Afghanistan 1,256
Total 64,627

Partner cities

Information on the partner cities can also be found at www.augsburg.de

Transport

Roads

The main road link is autobahn A 8 between Munich and Stuttgart.

Public transport

Public transport is very well catered for. It is controlled by the Augsburger Verkehrsverbund (Augsburg transport union, AVV) extended over central Swabia. There are seven rail Regionalbahn lines, five tram lines, 27 city bus lines and six night bus lines, as well as, several taxi companies.

The Augsburg tramway network is now 35.5 km-long after the opening of new lines to the university in 1996, the northern city boundary in 2001 and to the Klinikum Augsburg (Augsburg hospital) in 2002. Tram line 6, which runs 5.2 km from Friedberg West to Hauptbahnhof (Central Station), opened in December 2010.[17]

Intercity bus

There is one station for intercity bus services in Augsburg: Augsburg Nord, located in the north of the city.[18]

Railway

Bahnhofsgebäude Augsburg
The front of the station

Augsburg has seven stations, the Central Station (Hauptbahnhof), Hochzoll, Oberhausen, Haunstetterstraße, Morellstraße, Messe and Inningen. The Central Station, built from 1843 to 1846, is Germany’s oldest main station in a large city still providing services in the original building. It is currently being modernized and an underground tram station is built underneath it. Hauptbahnhof is on the Munich–Augsburg and Ulm–Augsburg lines and is connected by ICE and IC services to Munich, Berlin, Dortmund, Frankfurt, Hamburg and Stuttgart. As of December 2007, the French TGV connected Augsburg with a direct High Speed Connection to Paris. In addition EC and night train services connect to Amsterdam, Paris and Vienna and connections will be substantially improved by the creation of the planned Magistrale for Europe.

The AVV operates seven Regionalbahn lines from the main station to:

Starting in 2008, the regional services are planned to be altered to S-Bahn frequencies and developed long term as integrated into the Augsburg S-Bahn.

Air transport

Until 2005 Augsburg was served by nearby Augsburg Airport (AGB). In that year all air passenger transport was relocated to Munich Airport. Since then, the airport is used almost entirely by business airplanes.[19]

Economy

Erzengel-Michael-Augsburg-1
Statue of Archangel Michael in Augsburg
Industrial robots-transparent
KUKA's industrial robots

Augsburg is a vibrant industrial city. Many global market leaders namely MAN, EADS or KUKA produce high technology products like printing systems, large diesel engines, industrial robots or components for the Airbus A380 and the Ariane carrier rocket. After Munich, Augsburg is considered the high-tech centre for Information and Communication in Bavaria and takes advantage of its lower operating costs, yet close proximity to Munich and potential customers. In 2018 the Bavarian State Government recognized this fact and promoted Augsburg to Metropole.[20]

Major companies

Education

Augsburg is home to the following universities and colleges:

Media

The local newspaper is the Augsburger Allgemeine first published in 1807. There are also several local radio stations and a local TV station (a.tv).

Notable people

Holbeinhaus Augsburg
Holbein's house

Sports

Borussia dortmund augsburg
FC Augsburg against Borussia Dortmund in the Bundesliga at the SGL arena in November 2012.

FC Augsburg is a football team based in Augsburg and plays in the WWK ARENA. FC Augsburg was promoted to Bundesliga in 2011. The new stadium (opened in July 2009) also hosted games of the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

The city is home to a DEL (first-division) ice hockey team, the Augsburger Panther. The original club, AEV, was formed in 1878, the oldest German ice sport club and regularly draws around 4000 spectators, quite reasonable for German ice hockey. Home games are played at the Curt Frenzel Stadion: a recently rebuilt (2012–2013) indoor rink and modern stadium. Also Augsburg is home to one of the most traditional German Baseball clubs, the Augsburg Gators and 2 American Football Clubs, the Raptors and Augsburg Storm, and in nearby Königsbrunn there's the Königsbrunn Ants.

For the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, a Lech River dam protective diversionary canal for river ice was converted into the world's first artificial whitewater slalom course: the Eiskanal and remains a world-class venue for whitewater competition and served as prototype for two dozen similar foreign courses.

Local city nicknames

While commonly called Fuggerstadt (Fuggers' city) due to the Fuggers residing there, within Swabia it is also often referred to as Datschiburg: which originated sometime in the 19th century refers to Augsburg's favorite sweet: the Datschi made from fruit, preferably prunes, and thin cake dough.[25] The Datschiburger Kickers charity football team (founded in 1965) reflects this in its choice of team name.[26][27]

Among younger people, the city is commonly called "Aux" for short.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ "Fortschreibung des Bevölkerungsstandes". Bayerisches Landesamt für Statistik und Datenverarbeitung (in German). September 2018.
  2. ^ "Und-wieder-5000-Menschen-mehr-Augsburg-waechst-und-waechst". www.augsburger-allgemeine.de. 2015-02-17.
  3. ^ John G. Kelcey; Norbert Müller (7 June 2011). Plants and Habitats of European Cities. Springer Science & Business Media. ISBN 978-0-387-89684-7.
  4. ^ "Augsburg". Collins Dictionary. n.d. Retrieved 2014-09-26.
  5. ^ "Stadt Augsburg - Home - Stadt Augsburg". .augsburg.de. 2014-05-01. Archived from the original on 2013-10-20. Retrieved 2014-05-05.
  6. ^ Hays, J. N. (2005). Epidemics and pandemics: their impacts on human history. Santa Barbara, Calif.: ABC-CLIO. p. 98. ISBN 1-85109-658-2.
  7. ^ "Leopold Mozart | Biography & History | AllMusic". allmusic.com. Retrieved 2017-02-24.
  8. ^ "BBC Bitesize - GCSE Drama - Epic theatre and Brecht - Revision 1". bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2017-02-24.
  9. ^ Wolfgang Sofsky, William Templer, The Order of Terror: The Concentration Camp: Princeton University Press: 1999, ISBN 0-691-00685-7, page 183
  10. ^ Edward Victor. Alphabetical List of Camps, Subcamps and Other Camps. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-02-22. Retrieved 2008-07-25.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  11. ^ Statistisches Jahrbuch der Stadt Augsburg – Chapter 11: Election results of the Town Council since 1946 (PDF; 2,6 MB)
  12. ^ "Kommunalwahlen in Bayern 2014". kommunalwahl2014.bayern.de. Retrieved 2017-02-24.
  13. ^ ePaper 14. January 2014: Results of the Bundestagswahl 2014 in Augsburg (PDF; 12,1 MB)
  14. ^ "Germany Bavaria Museums and Galleries Römisches Museum Augsburg". bavaria.by. Archived from the original on 2017-02-25. Retrieved 2017-02-24.
  15. ^ Küchlin: Herkomen der stat zu Augspurg, ed. Ferdinand Frensdorff. In: Die Chroniken der deutschen Städte, Band 4. Leipzig 1865, p. 343-356.
  16. ^ "Strukturdaten nach Stadtbezirk" (PDF). Retrieved 25 June 2018.
  17. ^ "Railway Gazette: Urban rail news in brief". Retrieved 2011-01-02.
  18. ^ "Augsburg: Stations". Travelinho.com.
  19. ^ "Augsburg Airport (EDMA)". flughafen-augsburg.de. Retrieved 2017-02-24.
  20. ^ "Verordnung zur Änderung der Verordnung über das Landesentwicklungsprogramm Bayern" (PDF). Bayerisches Staatsministerium der Finanzen, für Landesentwicklung und Heimat. 2018-02-21. Retrieved 2018-07-18.
  21. ^ "BÖWE SYSTEC GmbH | Kuvertiersysteme, Kartenversandsysteme, Sortieranlagen, Lesetechnologie und Software". boewe-systec.com. Retrieved 2017-02-24.
  22. ^ "Universität Augsburg". uni-augsburg.de. Retrieved 2017-02-24.
  23. ^ "Oskar Schindler's collaborator, Mietek Pemper, has died". Agence France-Presse. The Gazette (Montreal). 2011-06-15. Retrieved 2011-06-26.
  24. ^ Martin, Douglas (2011-06-18). "Mietek Pemper, 91, Camp Inmate Who Compiled Schindler's List". The New York Times. Archived from the original on June 23, 2011. Retrieved 2011-06-26.
  25. ^ Augsburger Stadtlexikon – Datschiburg ‹See Tfd›(in German) accessed: 18 November 2008
  26. ^ Datschiburger Kickers website Archived 2009-10-06 at the Wayback Machine accessed: 18 November 2008
  27. ^ Augsburger Stadtlexikon – Datschiburger Kickers ‹See Tfd›(in German) accessed: 18 November 2008

References

  • Die Chroniken der schwäbischen Städte, Augsburg, (Leipzig, 1865–1896).
  • Werner, Geschichte der Stadt Augsburg, (Augsburg, 1900).
  • Lewis, "The Roman Antiquities of Augsburg and Ratisbon", in volume xlviii, Archæological Journal, (London, 1891).
  • Michael Schulze, Augsburg in one day. A city tour Lehmstedt Verlag, Leipzig 2015, ISBN 978-3957970176.

External links

2018–19 Bundesliga

The 2018–19 Bundesliga was the 56th season of the Bundesliga, Germany's premier football competition. It began on 24 August 2018 and concluded on 18 May 2019. It also marked the first season without Hamburger SV, previously the only team to have played in the top tier of German football in every season since the end of World War I.Following a trial phase in the previous season, the video assistant referee system was officially approved for use in the Bundesliga after being added to the Laws of the Game by IFAB.Bayern Munich were the defending champions, and won their 28th Bundesliga title (and 29th German title) and seventh consecutive Bundesliga on the final matchday.

Apology of the Augsburg Confession

The Apology of the Augsburg Confession was written by Philipp Melanchthon during and after the 1530 Diet of Augsburg as a response to the Pontifical Confutation of the Augsburg Confession, Charles V's commissioned official Roman Catholic response to the Lutheran Augsburg Confession of June 25, 1530. It was intended to be a defense of the Augsburg Confession and a refutation of the Confutation. It was signed as a confession of faith by leading Lutheran magnates and clergy at the meeting of the Smalcald League in February, 1537, and subsequently included in the German [1580] and Latin [1584] Book of Concord. As the longest document in the Book of Concord it offers the most detailed Lutheran response to the Roman Catholicism of that day as well as an extensive Lutheran exposition of the doctrine of Justification.

Augsburg Arena

Augsburg Arena, currently known commercially as the WWK Arena (German pronunciation: [ˌveːveːˈkaː ʔaˌʁeːnaː], officially stylised as WWK ARENA) is a football stadium in Augsburg, Bavaria, Germany. It is used mostly for football matches and hosts the home matches of FC Augsburg.

The stadium has a capacity of 30,660 with 19,060 seats and standing room for 11,034. A second phase of construction could expand capacity to 49,000 in the future. It replaced the club's previous home stadium, Rosenaustadion.

During the time of designing and constructing the stadium, it was called "Augsburg Arena" [ˈʔaʊksbʊʁk ʔaˌʁeːnaː]. It was opened as "Impuls Arena" ([ʔɪmˈpʊls ʔaˌʁeːnaː], officially stylised as impuls arena), and was renamed "SGL Arena" ([ˌʔɛsɡeːˈʔɛl ʔaˌʁeːnaː], officially stylised as SGL arena) after SGL Carbon acquired the naming rights for the structure in May 2011. The contract had a term of seven years and began on 1 July 2011. On 1 July 2015 the stadium naming rights were acquired by WWK, an insurance company, changing the official name of the stadium to "WWK ARENA".Augsburg was one of the official host cities of the 2010 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup and the subsequent 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. The Impuls arena was the location of several matches during the group stage and the quarterfinals. During the FIFA-competitions it was renamed "FIFA Women's World Cup Stadium Augsburg".

WWK Arena is the first climate-neutral football stadium in the world. The carbon neutrality was achieved by six ecological heat pumps (40 m deep), which produce the desired temperature via heat exchangers. A bio natural gas boiler also supplies the necessary energy during peak load times at a game. In 2017, a new stadium facade will be made for the WWK Arena.

Augsburg Confession

The Augsburg Confession, also known as the Augustan Confession or the Augustana from its Latin name, Confessio Augustana, is the primary confession of faith of the Lutheran Church and one of the most important documents of the Protestant Reformation. The Augsburg Confession was written in both German and Latin and was presented by a number of German rulers and free-cities at the Diet of Augsburg on 25 June 1530.

The Holy Roman Emperor Charles V had called on the Princes and Free Territories in Germany to explain their religious convictions in an attempt to restore religious and political unity in the Holy Roman Empire and rally support against the Turkish invasion. It is the fourth document contained in the Lutheran Book of Concord.

Augsburg Eiskanal

The Augsburg Eiskanal is an artificial whitewater river in Augsburg, Germany, constructed as the canoe slalom venue for the 1972 Summer Olympics in nearby Munich.

The first artificial whitewater course of its kind, it introduced the sport of canoe slalom (using decked canoes and kayaks) to the Olympic Games. However, because of the expense of building artificial rivers and supplying them with water, canoe slalom was missing from the next four Summer Olympics. It returned with the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona, and has been featured in every Summer Olympics since then.The Eiskanal has thus served as the prototype for six Olympic whitewater venues, from 1992 through 2012, and for more than fifty training and competition facilities in eighteen countries (see list). Despite being the oldest, it is still one of the most widely used, hosting two World Championships and numerous World Cup races. It was a World Cup venue for all but four of the years 1990 through 2010, and it was so again in 2013 and 2014.

The facility and its website are jointly managed by two clubs with headquartets in the boat house, Augsburger Kayak Club eV and Canoe Schwaben Augsburg.

Augsburg University

Augsburg University is a private liberal arts college in Minneapolis, Minnesota that is affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. Upon its founding in 1869, it was a Norwegian-American Lutheran seminary known as Augsburg Seminarium. Its first college class began in the fall of 1874. Today, the university enrolls approximately 3000 undergraduate students and 800 graduate students. The school is known for its emphasis on service learning; volunteering in the community is both an instructional strategy and a required part of a student's coursework. In 2010 Augsburg was one of the six higher education institutions to receive the Presidential Award for Community Service, sponsored by the Corporation for National and Community Service. In 2017 the name of the school changed from Augsburg College to Augsburg University.

Augsburger Panther

The Augsburger Panther are a professional ice hockey team in the Deutsche Eishockey Liga. The team is based in Augsburg, Bavaria, Germany. They play their home games at the Curt Frenzel Stadion.

Founded in 1878, the team's name was Augsburger EV (Augsburger Eislaufverein, i.e. "Augsburgian Skating Society") until 1994, when it was changed to Augsburger Panther.

Book of Concord

The Book of Concord (1580) or Concordia (often referred to as the Lutheran Confessions) is the historic doctrinal standard of the Lutheran Church, consisting of ten credal documents recognized as authoritative in Lutheranism since the 16th century. They are also known as the symbolical books of the Evangelical Lutheran Church.The Book of Concord was published in German on June 25, 1580 in Dresden, the fiftieth anniversary of the presentation of the Augsburg Confession to Emperor Charles V at the Diet of Augsburg. The authoritative Latin edition was published in 1584 in Leipzig.Those who accept it as their doctrinal standard recognize it to be a faithful exposition of the Bible. The Holy Scriptures are set forth in The Book of Concord to be the sole, divine source and norm of all Christian doctrine.

Evangelical Church of the Augsburg Confession in Poland

The Evangelical Church of the Augsburg Confession in Poland (Polish: Kościół Ewangelicko-Augsburski w Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej) is a Lutheran denomination and the largest Protestant body in Poland with about 61,000 members and 133 parishes.

FC Augsburg

Fußball-Club Augsburg 1907 e. V., commonly known as FC Augsburg (German pronunciation: [ʔɛf t͡seː ˈʔaʊ̯ksbʊʁk]) or Augsburg, is a German football club based in Augsburg, Bavaria. FC Augsburg play in the Bundesliga, the top tier of the German football league system. The team was founded as Fußball-Klub Alemania Augsburg in 1907 and played as BC Augsburg from 1921 to 1969. With over 12,200 members, it is the largest football club in Swabian Bavaria.

FC Augsburg, which has long fluctuated between the second and third division, experienced a difficult time in the early 2000s, suffering relegation to the fourth division for two seasons. FCA recovered from this, returning to professional football in 2006. At the end of the 2010–11 season, Augsburg were promoted to the Bundesliga for the first time. Since 2009, FC Augsburg's stadium has been the WWK ARENA.

Football at the 1972 Summer Olympics

The 1972 Olympic football tournament, held in Munich, Augsburg, Ingolstadt, Nürnberg, Passau, and Regensburg, was played as part of the 1972 Summer Olympics. The tournament features 16 men's national teams from five continental confederations. The 16 teams are drawn into four groups of four and each group plays a round-robin tournament. At the end of the group stage, the top two teams advanced to the second group stage, where the second-placed teams in each group advanced to the bronze medal match while the first-placed teams advanced to the gold medal match held at Olympic Stadium on 10 September 1972.

Fugger

Fugger (German pronunciation: [ˈfʊɡɐ]) is a German family that was historically a prominent group of European bankers, members of the fifteenth- and sixteenth-century mercantile patriciate of Augsburg, international mercantile bankers, and venture capitalists. Alongside the Welser family, the Fugger family controlled much of the European economy in the sixteenth century and accumulated enormous wealth. The Fuggers held a near monopoly on the European copper market.

This banking family replaced the de' Medici family, who influenced all of Europe during the Renaissance. The Fuggers took over many of the Medicis' assets and their political power and influence. They were closely affiliated with the House of Habsburg whose rise to world power they financed. Unlike the citizenry of their hometown, they never converted to Lutheranism as presented in the Augsburg Confession but rather remained with the Roman Catholic Church.

Jakob Fugger "the Rich" was elevated to the nobility of the Holy Roman Empire in May 1511 and assumed the title Imperial Count of Kirchberg and Weissenhorn in 1514. Today he is considered to be one of the wealthiest people ever to have lived. The company was dissolved in 1657, however the Fuggers remained wealthy landowners and ruled the County of Kirchberg and Weissenhorn. The Babenhausen branch became Princes of the Holy Roman Empire in 1803, the Glött branch princes in the Kingdom of Bavaria in 1914.

Grand Alliance (League of Augsburg)

The Grand Alliance is the name commonly used for the coalition formed on 20 December 1689 by England and the Dutch Republic (both led by Dutch stadtholder William III), and Holy Roman Emperor Leopold, including the Archduchy of Austria. With the later additions of Spain and Savoy, this fought the 1688–97 Nine Years' War against France that ended with the 1697 Treaty of Ryswick.

It was reformed in September 1701 by the Treaty of The Hague shortly before the War of the Spanish Succession and dissolved after the 1714 Peace of Utrecht. This is often referred to as the Second Grand Alliance.

Lutheranism

Lutheranism is a major branch of Western Christianity that identifies with the teaching of Martin Luther, a 16th century German reformer. Luther's efforts to reform the theology and practice of the church launched the Protestant Reformation. The reaction of the government and church authorities to the international spread of his writings, beginning with the 95 Theses, divided Western Christianity.The split between the Lutherans and the Catholics was made public and clear with the 1521 Edict of Worms: the edicts of the Diet condemned Luther and officially banned citizens of the Holy Roman Empire from defending or propagating his ideas, subjecting advocates of Lutheranism to forfeiture of all property, half of the seized property to be forfeit to the imperial government and the remaining half forfeit to the party who brought the accusation.The divide centered primarily on two points: the proper source of authority in the church, often called the formal principle of the Reformation, and the doctrine of justification, often called the material principle of Lutheran theology. Lutheranism advocates a doctrine of justification "by grace alone through faith alone on the basis of Scripture alone", the doctrine that scripture is the final authority on all matters of faith. This is in contrast to the belief of the Roman Catholic Church, defined at the Council of Trent, concerning authority coming from both the Scriptures and Tradition.Unlike Calvinism, Lutherans retain many of the liturgical practices and sacramental teachings of the pre-Reformation Church, with a particular emphasis on the Eucharist, or Lord's Supper. Lutheran theology differs from Reformed theology in Christology, divine grace, the purpose of God's Law, the concept of perseverance of the saints, and predestination.

MAN SE

MAN SE (abbreviation of Maschinenfabrik Augsburg-Nürnberg, German: [maˈʃiːnənfaˌbʁiːk ˈʔaʊksbʊɐ̯k ˈnʏɐ̯nbɛɐ̯k, -faˌbʁɪk-]), formerly MAN AG, is a German mechanical engineering company and parent company of the MAN Group. It is a subsidiary of automaker Volkswagen AG. MAN SE is based in Munich. Its primary output is for the automotive industry, particularly heavy trucks. Further activities include the production of diesel engines for various applications, like marine propulsion, and also turbomachinery.MAN supplies trucks, buses, diesel engines and turbomachinery. In 2016, its 53,824 employees generated annual sales of around €13.6 billion.

Nine Years' War

The Nine Years' War (1688–97)—often called the War of the Grand Alliance or the War of the League of Augsburg—was a conflict between Louis XIV of France and a European coalition of the Holy Roman Empire (led by Austria), the Dutch Republic, Spain, England and Savoy. It was fought in Europe and the surrounding seas, North America and in India. It is sometimes considered the first global war. The conflict encompassed the Williamite war in Ireland and Jacobite risings in Scotland, where William III and James II struggled for control of England and Ireland, and a campaign in colonial North America between French and English settlers and their respective Indigenous allies, today called King William's War by Americans.

Louis XIV of France had emerged from the Franco-Dutch War in 1678 as the most powerful monarch in Europe, an absolute ruler who had won numerous military victories. Using a combination of aggression, annexation, and quasi-legal means, Louis XIV set about extending his gains to stabilize and strengthen France's frontiers, culminating in the brief War of the Reunions (1683–84). The Truce of Ratisbon guaranteed France's new borders for twenty years, but Louis XIV's subsequent actions—notably his Edict of Fontainebleau (the revocation of the Edict of Nantes) in 1685— led to the deterioration of his military and political dominance. Louis XIV's decision to cross the Rhine in September 1688 was designed to extend his influence and pressure the Holy Roman Empire into accepting his territorial and dynastic claims. Leopold I and the German princes resolved to resist, and when the States General and William III brought the Dutch and the English into the war against France, the French king faced a powerful coalition aimed at curtailing his ambitions.

The main fighting took place around France's borders in the Spanish Netherlands, the Rhineland, the Duchy of Savoy and Catalonia. The fighting generally favoured Louis XIV's armies, but by 1696 his country was in the grip of an economic crisis. The Maritime Powers (England and the Dutch Republic) were also financially exhausted, and when Savoy defected from the Alliance, all parties were keen to negotiate a settlement. By the terms of the Treaty of Ryswick (1697) Louis XIV retained the whole of Alsace but was forced to return Lorraine to its ruler and give up any gains on the right bank of the Rhine. Louis XIV also accepted William III as the rightful King of England, while the Dutch acquired a Barrier fortress system in the Spanish Netherlands to help secure their borders. With the ailing and childless Charles II of Spain approaching his end, a new conflict over the inheritance of the Spanish Empire embroiled Louis XIV and the Grand Alliance in the War of the Spanish Succession.

Peace of Augsburg

The Peace of Augsburg, also called the Augsburg Settlement, was a treaty between Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor (the predecessor of Ferdinand I), and the Schmalkaldic League, signed in September 1555 at the imperial city of Augsburg. It officially ended the religious struggle between the two groups and made the legal division of Christianity permanent within the Holy Roman Empire, allowing rulers to choose either Lutheranism or Roman Catholicism as the official confession of their state. However, the Peace of Augsburg arrangement is also credited to ending much Christian unity around Europe. Before, the main religion was Roman Catholicism with a few practicers of Lutheranism. Now, if a ruler chose for his or her subjects to practice Lutheranism, the population which endorsed and practiced Lutheranism increased greatly. Calvinism was not allowed until the Peace of Westphalia.

Prince-Bishopric of Augsburg

The Prince-Bishopric of Augsburg (German: Fürstbistum Augsburg; Hochstift Augsburg) was one of the prince-bishoprics of the Holy Roman Empire, and belonged to the Swabian Circle. It should not be confused with the larger diocese of Augsburg, over which the prince-bishop exercised only spiritual authority.

The city of Augsburg proper, after it gained free imperial status, was a separate entity and constitutionally and politically independent of the prince-bishopric of the same name. The prince-bishopric covered some 2365 km2 and had approximately 100,000 inhabitants at the time it was annexed to Bavaria in the course of the German mediatization.

University of Augsburg

The University of Augsburg (German: Universität Augsburg) is a university located in the Universitätsviertel section of Augsburg, Germany. It was founded in 1970 and is organized in 8 Faculties.

The University of Augsburg is a relatively young campus university with approx. 18,000 students in October 2012. About 14% of its students come from foreign countries, a larger percentage than at comparable German universities.In October 2011 Sabine Doering Manteuffel succeeded Alois Loidl as rector of the university. She is the first female rector of a Bavarian university.

The former President of Germany Joachim Gauck holds a Doctor honoris causa of the University of Augsburg.

Climate data for Augsburg (1981–2010)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 2.3
(36.1)
4.1
(39.4)
8.9
(48.0)
13.6
(56.5)
18.5
(65.3)
21.4
(70.5)
23.8
(74.8)
23.5
(74.3)
18.8
(65.8)
13.4
(56.1)
6.6
(43.9)
3.1
(37.6)
13.2
(55.8)
Daily mean °C (°F) −0.8
(30.6)
0.2
(32.4)
4.4
(39.9)
8.2
(46.8)
13.0
(55.4)
15.9
(60.6)
18.1
(64.6)
17.7
(63.9)
13.6
(56.5)
9.1
(48.4)
3.5
(38.3)
0.3
(32.5)
8.6
(47.5)
Average low °C (°F) −3.9
(25.0)
−3.7
(25.3)
−0.2
(31.6)
2.7
(36.9)
7.3
(45.1)
10.5
(50.9)
12.3
(54.1)
11.9
(53.4)
8.3
(46.9)
4.8
(40.6)
0.3
(32.5)
−2.5
(27.5)
4.0
(39.2)
Average rainfall mm (inches) 40.1
(1.58)
36.6
(1.44)
47.8
(1.88)
50.7
(2.00)
85.5
(3.37)
90.0
(3.54)
99.7
(3.93)
92.2
(3.63)
65.9
(2.59)
52.8
(2.08)
52.1
(2.05)
53.5
(2.11)
766.9
(30.2)
Mean monthly sunshine hours 64.1 90.1 127.3 173.8 211.8 218.1 240.1 223.2 159.3 107.9 59.1 48.7 1,723.5
Source: Météoclimat
Places adjacent to Augsburg
Flag of the Swabian League Swabian League (1488–1534) of the  Holy Roman Empire
Imperial cities
Nobility
Territories
Holy Roman Empire Swabian Circle (1500–1806) of the Holy Roman Empire
Ecclesiastical
Secular
Prelates
Counts
Lords
Cities
Flag of Bavaria Urban and rural districts in the Free State of Bavaria in Germany Flag of Germany
Urban
districts
Rural
districts
City divisions of Augsburg

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.