Audio mixing

Audio mixing is the process by which multiple sounds are combined into one or more channels. In the process, a source's volume level, frequency content, dynamics, and panoramic position are manipulated and or enhanced. This practical, aesthetic, or otherwise creative treatment is done in order to produce a finished version that is appealing to listeners.

Audio mixing is practiced for music, film, television and live sound. The process is generally carried out by a mixing engineer operating a mixing console or digital audio workstation.

FOH Pete Keppler with digidesign VENUE Profile live digital mixer and Genelec monitoring

Recorded music

AndySharpSeanCrooksMusicLane2008

Before the introduction of multitrack recording, all the sounds and effects that were to be part of a recording were mixed together at one time during a live performance. If the sound blend was not satisfactory, or if one musician made a mistake, the selection had to be performed over until the desired balance and performance was obtained. However, with the introduction of multitrack recording, the production phase of a modern recording has radically changed into one that generally involves three stages: recording, overdubbing, and mixdown.[1]

Film and television

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Audio console in a cable news control room.

Audio mixing for film and television is a process during the post-production stage of a moving image program by which a multitude of recorded sounds are combined. In the process, the source's signal level, frequency content, dynamics and panoramic position are commonly manipulated and effects added.

The process takes place on a mix stage, typically in a studio or theater, once the picture elements are edited into a final version. Normally the engineer will mix four main audio elements: speech (dialogue, ADR, voice-overs, etc.), ambience (or atmosphere), sound effects, and music.

Live sound

Tweaking Powered mixer

Live sound mixing is the process of electrically blending together multiple sound sources at a live event using a mixing console. Sounds used include those from instruments, voices, and pre-recorded material. Individual sources may be equalised and routed to effect processors to ultimately be amplified and reproduced via loudspeakers.[2] The live sound engineer balances the various audio sources in a way that best suits the needs of the event.[3]

References

  1. ^ Huber, David Miles (2001). Modern Recording Techniques. Focal Press. p. 321. ISBN 0240804562.
  2. ^ "Mixing Principles". Leonard Audio Institute. Retrieved 2013-01-03.
  3. ^ Tim Crosby. "How Live Sound Engineering Works". HowStuffWorks. Retrieved 2013-03-03.

Further reading

AMS Neve

AMS Neve Ltd was the result of the amalgamation in 1992 of AMS (Advanced Music Systems) with Neve Electronics.

Audio mixing (recorded music)

In sound recording and reproduction, audio mixing is the process of combining multitrack recordings into a final mono, stereo or surround sound product. These tracks that are blended together are done so by using various processes such as equalization and compression. Audio mixing techniques and approaches can vary widely, and due to the skill-level or intent of the mixer, can greatly affect the qualities of the sound recording.Audio mixing techniques largely depend on music genres and the quality of sound recordings involved. The process is generally carried out by a mixing engineer, though sometimes the record producer or recording artist may assist. After mixing, a mastering engineer prepares the final product for production.

Audio mixing may be performed on a mixing console or digital audio workstation.

Avid Audio

Avid Audio (formerly Digidesign) is a North American digital audio technology company. It was founded in 1984 by Peter Gotcher and Evan Brooks. The company began as a project to raise money for the founders' band, selling EPROM chips for drum machines. It is a subsidiary of Avid Technology, and during 2010 the Digidesign brand was phased out. Avid Audio products will continue to be produced and will now carry the Avid brand name.

Behringer

Behringer is an audio equipment company founded by the Swiss engineer Uli Behringer in 1989, in Willich, Germany. Behringer was listed as the 14th largest manufacturer of music products in 2007. Behringer is a multinational group of companies, with direct marketing presence in 10 countries or territories and a sales network in over 130 countries around the world. Though originally a German manufacturer, the company now makes its products in China.

The company is owned by Music Group, a holding company chaired by Uli Behringer, which also owns other audio companies such as Midas, Klark Teknik and Bugera, as well as Electronic Manufacturing Services company Eurotec. In June 2012, Music Group also acquired Turbosound company, which designs and manufactures professional loudspeaker systems and was formerly owned by Harman.

Coolaid

Coolaid is the fourteenth studio album by American West Coast hip hop recording artist Snoop Dogg. It was released on July 1, 2016, by Doggystyle Records and eOne Music. Recording sessions for the album took place during 2015 to 2016 at the Doggystyle Studios Records, in Diamond Bar, California. The production on the album was handled by Snoop Dogg and other record producers, including Just Blaze, Swizz Beatz and Timbaland. Snoop Dogg also enlisted a variety of guest vocalists such as Too $hort, Swizz Beatz, Jeremih, Wiz Khalifa, Trick Trick, E-40, Jazze Pha, Suga Free and October London, among others.

The album title was revealed during the late-night talk show Jimmy Kimmel Live! on June 2, 2016. The lead single "Kush Ups" was released on June 7, 2016. It was followed by the single "Point Seen Money Gone", which was released on June 27. The album received positive reviews from music critics, who praised Snoop's technical rapping abilities and production choices.

This album is notable for its employment of trap-type beats.

DJ mixer

A DJ mixer is a type of audio mixing console used by Disc jockeys (DJs) to control and manipulate multiple audio signals. Some DJs use the mixer to make seamless transitions from one song to another when they are playing records at a dance club. Hip hop DJs and turntablists use the DJ mixer to play record players like a musical instrument and create new sounds. DJs in the disco, house music, electronic dance music and other dance-oriented genres use the mixer to make smooth transitions between different sound recordings as they are playing. The sources are typically record turntables, compact cassettes, CDJs, or DJ software on a laptop. DJ mixers allow the DJ to use headphones to preview the next song before playing it to the audience. Most low- to mid-priced DJ mixers can only accommodate two turntables or CD players, but some mixers (such as the ones used in larger nightclubs) can accommodate up to four turntables or CD players. DJs and turntablists in hip hop music and nu metal use DJ mixers to create beats, loops and "scratching" sound effects.

Digital mixing console

In professional audio, a digital mixing console (DMC) is an electronic device used to combine, route, and change the dynamics, equalization and other properties of multiple audio input signals, using digital computers rather than analog circuitry. The digital audio samples, which is the internal representation of the analog inputs, are summed to what is known as a master channel to produce a combined output. A professional digital mixing console is a dedicated desk or control surface produced exclusively for the task, and is typically more robust in terms of user control, processing power and quality of audio effects. However, a computer with proper controller hardware can act as the device for the digital mixing console since it can mimic its interface, input and output.

Live sound mixing

Live sound mixing is the blending of multiple sound sources by an audio engineer using a mixing console or software. Sounds that are mixed include those from instruments and voices which are picked up by microphones (for drum kit, lead vocals and acoustic instruments like piano or saxophone and pickups for instruments such as electric bass) and pre-recorded material, such as songs on CD or a digital audio player. Individual sources are typically equalised to adjust the bass and treble response and routed to effect processors to ultimately be amplified and reproduced via a loudspeaker system. The live sound engineer listens and balances the various audio sources in a way that best suits the needs of the event.

Mackie

Mackie is an American professional audio products brand. Founded in Seattle in 1988 by Greg Mackie as a manufacturer of affordable and versatile compact pro audio mixers, Mackie is the primary product line of LOUD Technologies.

Metropolis Group

Metropolis Group is a music production and entertainment industry company established in 1989 by Gary Langan, Carey Taylor and Karin Clayton. It is located in the Powerhouse, a Grade II listed building, at 70 Chiswick High Road in Chiswick, London, England. Over the last twenty years the group has expanded and now consists of three divisions: Metropolis Studios, Metropolis Mastering, and Digital Media/Productions.

Metropolis Group was bought out on 31 May 2013 by 'MLML (Metropolis London Music Limited)' by Kainne Clements, (who also owns the Academy of Contemporary Music) The Group in 2017 gained a new CEO Richard Connell, a former Sony Music executive.

Mixing engineer

A mixing engineer (or simply mix engineer) is a person responsible for combining ("mixing") the different sonic elements of a piece of recorded music (vocals, instruments, effects etc.) into a final version of a song (also known as "final mix" or "mixdown"). He or she mixes the elements of a recorded piece together to achieve a good balance of volume, while at the same time deciding other properties such as pan positioning, effects, and so on.

The best mixing professionals typically have many years of experience and training with audio equipment, which has enabled them to master their craft. A mixing engineer occupies a space between artist and scientist, using their skill at assessing the harmonic structure of sound to enable them to fashion highly appealing timbres. Their work is found in all modern music, but many artists now mix and produce their own music with a digital audio workstation and a computer.

A more technical definition: an audio engineer in sound recording, audio editing and sound systems who balances the relative volume and frequency content of a number of sound sources. Typically, these sound sources are the different musical instruments in a band or vocalists, the sections of an orchestra and so on.

Roland Corporation

Roland Corporation (ローランド株式会社, Rōrando Kabushiki Kaisha) is a Japanese manufacturer of electronic musical instruments, electronic equipment and software. It was founded by Ikutaro Kakehashi in Osaka on April 18, 1972. In 2005, Roland's headquarters relocated to Hamamatsu in Shizuoka Prefecture. It has factories in Taiwan, Japan, and the USA. As of March 31, 2010, it employed 2,699 employees. In 2014, Roland was subject to a management buyout by Roland's CEO Junichi Miki, supported by Taiyo Pacific Partners.Roland has manufactured numerous instruments that have had lasting impacts on popular music, such as the Juno-106 synthesizer, TB-303 bass synthesizer, and TR-808 and TR-909 drum machines. In 2016, Fact wrote that Roland "arguably did more to shape electronic music than any other [company] in history".

Soundcraft

Soundcraft is a British designer and importer (formerly a manufacturer) of mixing consoles and other professional audio equipment. It is a subsidiary of Harman International Industries, which is owned by South Korean company Samsung Electronics. It was founded by sound engineer Phil Dudderidge and electronics designer Graham Blyth in 1973.

Studer

Studer is a designer and manufacturer of audio equipment for recording studios and broadcasters. The company was founded in Zürich, Switzerland, in 1948 by Willi Studer. It initially became known in the 1950s for its professional tape recorders. In the 1990s the company moved into the manufacture of mixing consoles.

Management, sales, engineering, R&D and customer service are based in Regensdorf, Switzerland, while manufacturing and marketing are part of the Soundcraft facility in Potters Bar, England. Studer is now a subsidiary of Harman International Industries which is owned by Samsung Electronics.

Talento de Barrio (soundtrack)

Talento de Barrio (English: Hood Talent) is a soundtrack album to the film of the same name starring Puerto Rican reggaeton singer-songwriter Daddy Yankee, who also performs the songs on the album. It was released on August 12, 2008 by Machete Music and El Cartel Records, to accompany the motion picture Talento de Barrio. The album was mainly produced by reggaeton producers Eli El Musicólogo and Menes. The album also received a Latin double platinum certification by the RIAA with an excess of 200,000 copies.

Traktor

Traktor is a DJ software package developed by Native Instruments. It is also used as a sub-brand for Native Instruments' associated DJ hardware products.

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