Atua

Atua are the gods and spirits of the Polynesian peoples such as the Māori or the Hawaiians. The Polynesian word literally means power or strength and so the concept is similar to that of mana. Today, it is also used for the monotheistic conception of God. Especially powerful atua included:[1]

  • Rongo – god of agriculture and peace
  • Tane – the creator of all living things such as animals, birds and trees
  • Tangaroa – god of the sea
  • Tu – the god of war
  • Whiro – god of darkness and evil

In Samoa, where atua means "god" in the Samoan language,[2] traditional tattooing was based on the doctrine of tutelary spirits.[3] There is also a district on the island of Upolu in Samoa called Atua.

In other Austronesian cultures, cognates of atua include the Polynesian aitu, Micronesian aniti, Bunun hanitu, Filipino and Tao anito, and Malaysian and Indonesian hantu or antu.[4]

Angie Yonaga from Danganronpa V3 mentions him.

See also

Notes and references

  1. ^ George McLean, Vensus A. George (2008), Paths to The Divine: Ancient and Indian, ISBN 9781565182486
  2. ^ Pratt, George (1984) [1893]. A Grammar and Dictionary of the Samoan Language, with English and Samoan vocabulary (3rd and revised ed.). Papakura, New Zealand: R. MacMillan. p. 270. ISBN 978-0-908712-09-0. Retrieved 8 July 2010.
  3. ^ Friedrich Ratzel (1896), The History of Mankind, MacMillan
  4. ^ Leberecht Funk (2014). "Entanglements between Tao People and Anito on Lanyu Island, Taiwan". In Y. Musharbash & G.H. Presterudstuen (ed.). Monster Anthropology in Australasia and Beyond. Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 143–159. doi:10.1057/9781137448651_9. ISBN 9781137448651.
A'ufaga

A'ufaga is a small village on the southeast end of Upolu island in Samoa. The village is part of the electoral constituency (Faipule District) Lepa which is included in the larger political district of Atua.The population is 468 (2006 Census).

Arahura (canoe)

Arahura, in Māori mythology (specifically that of the Ngāi Tahu people of the South Island), is a divine canoe which was made of pounamu (greenstone). The chiefs who traveled to New Zealand in her were Pekitahua, Rongokahe, Rangitatau, Hineraho, Te Rangitamau, Taewhenua, Te Mikimiki (Te Mingimingi), Atua-whakanihoniho, Te Atua-whakataratara, and Whakarewa (Tregear 1891:20, White 1887-1891, II:179).

Atua (district)

Atua is the most ancient district of Samoa, now consisting of most of the eastern section of Upolu but also traditionally incorporates Tutuila and once all of Upolu and Savaii. Lufilufi is the traditional center of the Atua district and is the residence of the royal Tui Atua (King of Atua) title. Governed by the 'Faleono' (House of six) orator group, it is the capital of Atua and is vested with the authority to appoint the Tui Atua. This authority is mirrored by the honorific title of 'Matua o Atua', (the Head, or Elder of Atua) which it holds.

The district has a population (2001 Census) of 21,168.

The paramount lineage is the Tui Atua line. Traditionally, and from the formation of Atua, all honours came from Leifi Ao o Atua (supreme head) who left his younger cousin Tui Atua Polailevao c. 1300 to care for Leifi's malae of Lalogafuafua, Lufi-lufi. Lalogafuafua being the main central meeting malae of all of Atua district and where all Tui Atua Titles are correctly bestowed.

The Tui Atua is one of the most ancient lineages in Samoa only predated by Tui Manu'a. Tui Atua alone are direct lineage heirs of the Tagaloalagi line of kings. The other ancient lines are the Tui Manu'a and the Tui A'ana.

The current Tui Atua is Tama Aiga, former Prime Minister and former Head of State, His Highness Tui Atua Tupua Tamasese Tupuola Tufuga Taisi Efi.

Fanuatapu

Fanuatapu is an uninhabited island which consists of a volcanic tuff ring, situated off the eastern tip of Upolu, Samoa. It is the smallest and easternmost of the four Aleipata Islands, with an area of 15 hectares, and has an automated lighthouse.

God Defend New Zealand

"God Defend New Zealand" (Māori: "Aotearoa", lit. 'New Zealand') is one of two national anthems of New Zealand, the other being "God Save the Queen". Legally the two have equal status, but "God Defend New Zealand" is more commonly used. Originally written as a poem, it was set to music as part of a competition in 1876. Over the years its popularity increased, and it was eventually named the second national anthem in 1977. It has English and Māori lyrics, with slightly different meanings. Since the late 1990s, the usual practice when performed in public is to perform the first verse of the national anthem twice, first in Māori and then in English.

Lia Maivia

Ofelia "Lia" Maivia (born Ofelia Fuataga; August 6, 1931 – October 19, 2008) was a Samoan-American professional wrestling promoter. She is credited as one of the first female professional wrestling promoters. Maivia was the wife of Samoan professional wrestler Peter Maivia and the grandmother of actor and wrestler, Dwayne Johnson, also known as The Rock.

Lotofaga

Lotofaga is a village on the south coast of Upolu island in Samoa. Lotofaga is also the name of the larger Lotofaga Electoral Constituency (Faipule District) which includes Lotofaga village and two other villages, Vavau and Matatufu.

The villages and Lotofaga Electoral Constituency all come within the larger political district of Atua.

The population of Lotofaga village is 1,089 (2006 Census).

The population of Lotofaga Electoral Constituency is 1,865 (2006 Census).

Luatuanu'u

Luatuanu'u is a village situated on the east side of Upolu island in Samoa. The village is part of Anoamaa West Electoral Constituency (Faipule District) which is within the larger political district of Atua.The population is 960 (2006 Census).

Lufilufi

Lufilufi is a historical village situated on the north coast of Upolu island in Samoa. The village is part of the electoral constituency (Faipule District) Anoamaa East which is within the larger political district of Atua.Lufilufi is the traditional center of the Atua district and is the residence of the royal Tui Atua chief title. Governed by the 'Faleono' (House of six) orator group, it is the capital of Atua and is vested with the authority to appoint the Tui Atua. This authority is mirrored by the honorific title of 'Matua o Atua', (the Head, or Elder of Atua) which it holds.

Situated in Lufilufi is the Methodist Piula Theological College and Piula Cave Pool.

Mahangaatuamatua

Mahanga-atua-matua is a canoe mentioned in a letter by Uma-kau-oho-mata-kamokamo, a Māori chief from the Tauranga district, New Zealand, quoted in White (1887-1891). Claiming that this canoe did not bring any food plants to New Zealand because it was too sacred to carry such items, and was manned by priests and chiefs, Uma-kau-oho-mata-kamokamo said that Mahanga-atua-matua was the first canoe to land in New Zealand, and that he or his people still possessed (the traditions relating to) the priests who built the canoe and the adzes that they used.

Matatufu

Matatufu is a small village on south east end of Upolu island in Samoa. The village is part of Lotofaga Electoral Constituency (Faipule District) which is within the larger political district of Atua.

The population is 420 (2006 Census).Neighbouring villages are Lotofaga and Vavau.

Nu'usafe'e Island

Nu'usafe'e Island is a small uninhabited island in Samoa.

The island is located off the south east coast of Upolu island, near the village of Poutasi.

Poutasi

Poutasi is a village on the south east coast of Upolu island in Samoa. The population was 379 in the 2006 Census. The village is part of Falealili Electoral Constituency (Faipule District) in the larger political district of Atua. Poutasi was extensively damaged by the 2009 Samoa earthquake and tsunami.

Pōmare I

Pōmare I (c. 1753 – September 3, 1803) (fully in old orthography: Tu-nui-ea-i-te-atua-i-Tarahoi Vaira'atoa Taina Pōmare I; also known as Tu or Tinah or Outu, or more formally as Tu-nui-e-a'a-i-te-atua) was the unifier and first king of Tahiti and founder of the Pōmare dynasty and the Kingdom of Tahiti between 1788 and 1791. He abdicated in 1791 but remained in power as the guardian regent during the minority of his successor Pōmare II from 1791 until 1803.

Seal of American Samoa

The Seal of the Territory of American Samoa is based in traditional local design. The fly switch (fue) represents wisdom and the staff (To'oto'o) represents authority. Both symbols are used by talking chiefs indicating their rank. The Tanoa (kava bowl) represents service to the chief. The tapa clothed background represents the artistry of the Samoan people. It also includes the date April 17, 1900, which was the date when the flag of American Samoa was officially adopted.On Flag Day April 17, 1973, the official seal of American Samoa, with the motto, Sāmoa Muamua Le Atua (English: "Samoa, Let God Be First"), was dedicated.The seal was introduced to the U.S. House of Representatives on March 2, 1985, by Delegate Fofó Iosefa Fiti Sunia. Fofo made the request in November 1981. The artwork was performed by the staff of the architect of the capitol.The Samoan motto Samoa Muamua Le Atua is translated “Samoa, God is First”.

Solosolo

Solosolo is a village on the northeast coast of Upolu island in Samoa. The village is in the political district of Atua and is one of the prominent settlements in the area with the largest population in its electoral constituency of Anoama'a West.

Te Atua Mou E

"Te Atua mou ē" ("God is Truth") is the national anthem of the Cook Islands. It was adopted in 1982, replacing the previous New Zealand anthem "God Defend New Zealand".

The music is by Sir Tom Davis, then Prime Minister of the Cook Islands. The words are by his wife, Pa Tepaeru Terito Ariki, Lady Davis.

Te Atua o Tokelau

"Te Atua o Tokelau" or "Tokelau mo te Atua" is the anthem of Tokelau, a territory within the Realm of New Zealand.

Tuvalu mo te Atua

Tuvalu for the Almighty (Tuvaluan: Tuvalu mo te Atua) is the national anthem of Tuvalu. The lyrics and music are by Afaese Manoa.

It was adopted in 1978, when the country became independent.

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