Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

The Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year is a basketball award given to the men's basketball player in the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) voted as the most outstanding player. It has been presented since the league's first season, 1953–54, by the Atlantic Coast Sports Media Association, and beginning in 2012–13 has also been presented in separate voting by the league's head coaches. The award was first given to Dickie Hemric of Wake Forest,[1] and the coaches' award was first presented in 2013 to Shane Larkin of Miami.[2]

Two players have won the award three times: David Thompson of North Carolina State and Ralph Sampson of Virginia.[3] Hemric, Len Chappell, Larry Miller, John Roche, Len Bias, Danny Ferry, Tim Duncan and J. J. Redick have won the award twice. There have been two ties in the award's history, which occurred at the end of the 2000–01 and 2012–13 seasons: In 2000–01 Joseph Forte of North Carolina and Shane Battier of Duke shared the award;[4] and Erick Green of Virginia Tech and Larkin shared honors in 2012–13. Green and Larkin split the honor in the first year that the ACC began voting for players of the year by the conference's coaches and media separately (the media chose Green while the coaches chose Larkin).[2][5]

Sixteen players have received either the Naismith or Wooden National Player of the Year awards in the same season that they received an ACC Player of the Year award.[a] Duke's Zion Williamson is the most recent player to achieve this (2019). Each of the original 1953 ACC members has had at least one of its players win the award. Five ACC members have not had a winner: Florida State, Louisville, Notre Dame, Pittsburgh, and Syracuse. However, of these schools, only Florida State joined the ACC before 2013.

ACC Men's Basketball Player of the Year
Atlantic Coast Conference logo
Given forthe most outstanding male basketball player in the Atlantic Coast Conference
CountryUnited States
Presented byAtlantic Coast Sports Media Association (1954–present)
ACC head coaches (2013–2016)
History
First award1954
Most recentZion Williamson, Duke

Key

Co-Players of the Year
* Awarded a national Player of the Year award:
Helms Foundation College Basketball Player of the Year (1904–05 to 1978–79)
UPI College Basketball Player of the Year (1954–55 to 1995–96)
Naismith College Player of the Year (1968–69 to present)
John R. Wooden Award (1976–77 to present)
M ACC media selection (2013–2016)
C ACC coaches' selection (2013–2016)
Player (X) Denotes the number of times the player had been awarded the ACC Player of the Year award at that point

Winners

Dickie Hemric WF
Dickie Hemric of Wake Forest won the first two awards in 1954 and 1955.
John Roche USC
John Roche won the award in 1969 and 1970.
David Thompson NC State
David Thompson of NC State is one of only two players to win the award three times (1973–1975).
Jordan by Lipofsky 16577
Michael Jordan won the award in 1984 as a junior while playing as a Tar Heel.
Tim duncan vs wizards 2009 cropped
Wake Forest's Tim Duncan won in 1996 and 1997.
Antawn Jamison Wizards
Antawn Jamison won in 1998 while playing for North Carolina.
J. J. Redick
J. J. Redick captured back-to-back ACC Player of the Year Awards in 2005 and 2006 as a Duke Blue Devil.
Season Player School Position Class[b] Reference
1953–54 Dickie Hemric Wake Forest Center Junior [1]
1954–55 Dickie Hemric (2) Wake Forest Center Senior [1]
1955–56 Ronnie Shavlik NC State Center Senior [6]
1956–57 Lennie Rosenbluth* North Carolina Power forward Senior [7]
1957–58 Pete Brennan North Carolina Small forward Senior [7]
1958–59 Lou Pucillo NC State Point guard Senior [6]
1959–60 Lee Shaffer North Carolina Power forward / Center Senior [7]
1960–61 Len Chappell Wake Forest Power forward / Center Junior [8]
1961–62 Len Chappell (2) Wake Forest Power forward / Center Senior [8]
1962–63 Art Heyman* Duke Shooting guard / Small forward Senior [9]
1963–64 Jeff Mullins Duke Small forward Senior [9]
1964–65 Billy Cunningham North Carolina Guard / Forward Senior [7]
1965–66 Steve Vacendak Duke Point guard Senior [9]
1966–67 Larry Miller North Carolina Shooting guard Junior [7]
1967–68 Larry Miller (2) North Carolina Shooting guard Senior [7]
1968–69 John Roche South Carolina Point guard / Shooting guard Sophomore [10]
1969–70 John Roche (2) South Carolina Point guard / Shooting guard Junior [10]
1970–71 Charlie Davis[c] Wake Forest Guard Senior [11]
1971–72 Barry Parkhill Virginia Shooting guard Junior [12]
1972–73 David Thompson NC State Shooting guard / Small forward Sophomore [6]
1973–74 David Thompson (2) NC State Shooting guard / Small forward Junior [6]
1974–75 David Thompson* (3) NC State Shooting guard / Small forward Senior [6]
1975–76 Mitch Kupchak North Carolina Power forward Senior [7]
1976–77 Rod Griffin Wake Forest Power forward Junior [13]
1977–78 Phil Ford* North Carolina Point guard Senior [7]
1978–79 Mike Gminski Duke Center Junior [9]
1979–80 Albert King Maryland Guard / Forward Junior [14]
1980–81 Ralph Sampson* Virginia Center Sophomore [3]
1981–82 Ralph Sampson* (2) Virginia Center Junior [3]
1982–83 Ralph Sampson* (3) Virginia Center Senior [3]
1983–84 Michael Jordan* North Carolina Shooting guard Junior [7]
1984–85 Len Bias Maryland Small forward Junior [14]
1985–86 Len Bias (2) Maryland Small forward Senior [14]
1986–87 Horace Grant Clemson Power forward Senior [13]
1987–88 Danny Ferry Duke Center Junior [9]
1988–89 Danny Ferry* (2) Duke Center Senior [9]
1989–90 Dennis Scott Georgia Tech Small forward Junior [13]
1990–91 Rodney Monroe NC State Shooting guard Senior [6]
1991–92 Christian Laettner* Duke Center Senior [9]
1992–93 Rodney Rogers Wake Forest Small forward / Guard Junior [13]
1993–94 Grant Hill Duke Shooting guard / Small forward Senior [3][9]
1994–95 Joe Smith* Maryland Power forward Sophomore [14]
1995–96 Tim Duncan Wake Forest Center Junior [3]
1996–97 Tim Duncan* (2) Wake Forest Center Senior [3]
1997–98 Antawn Jamison* North Carolina Power forward Junior [7]
1998–99 Elton Brand* Duke Center Sophomore [15]
1999–00 Chris Carrawell Duke Shooting guard / Small forward Senior [9]
2000–01 Shane Battier* Duke Small forward Senior [4][9]
2000–01 Joseph Forte North Carolina Shooting guard Sophomore [4][7]
2001–02 Juan Dixon Maryland Shooting guard Senior [14]
2002–03 Josh Howard Wake Forest Small forward Senior [16]
2003–04 Julius Hodge NC State Guard/Forward Junior [6][17]
2004–05 J. J. Redick Duke Shooting guard Junior [9][18]
2005–06 J. J. Redick* (2) Duke Shooting guard Senior [18]
2006–07 Jared Dudley Boston College Small forward Senior [19]
2007–08 Tyler Hansbrough* North Carolina Power forward Junior [7][20]
2008–09 Ty Lawson North Carolina Point guard Junior [7][21]
2009–10 Greivis Vasquez Maryland Point guard Senior [22]
2010–11 Nolan Smith Duke Point guard Senior [23]
2011–12 Tyler Zeller North Carolina Center Senior [24]
2012–13 Erick GreenM Virginia Tech Point guard Senior [5]
2012–13 Shane LarkinC Miami (FL) Point guard Sophomore [2]
2013–14 T. J. Warren NC State Small forward Sophomore [25][26]
2014–15 Jahlil Okafor Duke Center Freshman [27][28]
2015–16 Malcolm Brogdon Virginia Shooting guard Senior [29][30]
2016–17 Justin Jackson North Carolina Small forward Junior [31]
2017–18 Marvin Bagley III Duke Power forward Freshman [32]
2018–19 Zion Williamson* Duke Power forward Freshman [33]

Winners by school

School (year joined)[34] Winners Years
Duke (1953) 17 1963, 1964, 1966, 1979, 1988, 1989, 1992, 1994, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2005, 2006, 2011, 2015, 2018, 2019
North Carolina (1953) 15 1957, 1958, 1960, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1976, 1978, 1984, 1998, 2001, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2017
Wake Forest (1953) 10 1954, 1955, 1961, 1962, 1971, 1977, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2003
NC State (1953) 8 1956, 1959, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1991, 2004, 2014
Maryland (1953)[d] 6 1980, 1985, 1986, 1995, 2002, 2010
Virginia (1953) 5 1972, 1981, 1982, 1983, 2016
South Carolina (1953)[e] 2 1969, 1970
Boston College (2005) 1 2007
Clemson (1953) 1 1987
Georgia Tech (1978) 1 1990
Miami (FL) (2004) 1 2013
Virginia Tech (2004) 1 2013
Florida State (1991) 0
Louisville (2014) 0
Notre Dame (2013) 0
Pittsburgh (2013) 0
Syracuse (2013) 0

Footnotes

See also

References

General
  • "2008–09 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Media Guide". Atlantic Coast Conference. 2008. p. 139. Archived from the original on 31 December 2010. Retrieved 2 September 2009. Click on the PDF link labeled "Pages 133–152" to access the guide pages with the list of winners.
Specific
  1. ^ a b c Sumner, Jim (4 February 2009). "Looking Back... Dickie Hemric's Record-Setting Career". theACC.com. Archived from the original on 22 March 2012. Retrieved 2 September 2009.
  2. ^ a b c "ACC coaches pick Miami's Shane Larkin as player of year". fayobserver.com. The Fayetteville Observer. March 20, 2013. Archived from the original on September 25, 2013. Retrieved July 2, 2013.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Porterfield, Jason (2008). Basketball in the ACC. New York: Rosen Publishing. pp. 6, 28–35. ISBN 978-1-4042-1380-7. Retrieved 2 September 2009.
  4. ^ a b c "Battier, Forte Tie For ACC Player of The Year Award". theACC.com. 13 March 2001. Archived from the original on 22 March 2012. Retrieved 3 September 2009.
  5. ^ a b Wood, Norm (March 12, 2013). "Virginia Tech's Erick Green earns ACC's player of the year honors". Daily Press. Retrieved March 12, 2013.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g Peeler, Tim (2009). "NC State's History of Success". NC State Wolfpack Athletics. Retrieved 2 September 2009.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "Lawson Named ACC Player Of The Year". University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. 10 March 2009. Archived from the original on 16 April 2009. Retrieved 2 September 2009.
  8. ^ a b "Len Chappell Named ACC Legend". Wake Forest University. 19 March 2008. Retrieved 2 September 2009.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Duke's J.J. Redick named ACC Player of the Year". Chatham Journal. 17 March 2005. Retrieved 2 September 2009.
  10. ^ a b "ACC 50th Anniversary Team". National Basketball Association. 26 September 2009. Archived from the original on December 2, 2009. Retrieved 2 September 2009.
  11. ^ a b "Charlie Davis". Forsyth County, North Carolina. 2009. Retrieved 2 September 2009.
  12. ^ "Barry Parkhill bio". University of Virginia. 24 August 2007. Archived from the original on 27 February 2012. Retrieved 2 September 2009.
  13. ^ a b c d "ACC Players & Rookies of the Week". theACC.com. 2009. Archived from the original on 15 September 2012. Retrieved 3 September 2009.
  14. ^ a b c d e Associated Press (12 March 2002). "Maryland's Juan Dixon Named ACC Player of the Year by Associated Press". theACC.com. Archived from the original on 22 March 2012. Retrieved 2 September 2009.
  15. ^ "Elton Brand, Cindy Parlow Named ACC Athletes of the Year". theACC.com. 16 July 1999. Archived from the original on 22 March 2012. Retrieved 2 September 2009.
  16. ^ Associated Press (19 March 2003). "Howard Named ACC Player Of The Year". theACC.com. Archived from the original on 22 March 2012. Retrieved 2 September 2009.
  17. ^ Haynes, Tony (17 March 2004). "ACC Player of the Year: Julius Hodge". theACC.com. Archived from the original on 22 March 2012. Retrieved 2 September 2009.
  18. ^ a b Beard, Aaron (7 March 2009). "Duke's J.J. Redick Named ACC Player of Year for Second Straight Season". theACC.com. Archived from the original on 16 July 2011. Retrieved 2 September 2009.
  19. ^ "BC's Jared Dudley Named ACC Player of the Year". theACC.com. 6 March 2007. Archived from the original on 31 December 2010. Retrieved 2 September 2009.
  20. ^ Beard, Alan; McCreary, Joedy (11 March 2008). "North Carolina's Tyler Hansbrough Tabbed 2008 ACC Player of the Year". theACC.com. Archived from the original on 13 May 2008. Retrieved 2 September 2009.
  21. ^ Associated Press (10 March 2009). "North Carolina's Lawson named ACC player of year". Sporting News. Retrieved 2 September 2009.
  22. ^ Barker, Jeff (9 March 2010). "Vasquez, Williams get top ACC honors". Baltimore Sun. Archived from the original on 3 July 2012. Retrieved 9 March 2010.
  23. ^ "ACSMA Announces 2010–11 Individual Awards for ACC Men's Basketball". theacc.com. March 8, 2011. Archived from the original on December 9, 2012.
  24. ^ "UNC's Zeller Named ACC Player of the Year". Greensboro News & Record. March 6, 2011. Archived from the original on July 2, 2012. Retrieved March 6, 2012.
  25. ^ "NC State's Warren Voted ACC Player Of The Year". theacc.com. March 11, 2014.
  26. ^ "Wolfpack's TJ Warren is ACC Player of the Year". The News & Observer. March 11, 2014. Archived from the original on March 14, 2014.
  27. ^ "Jahlil Okafor wins ACC Player of the Year; Tony Bennett Coach of the Year". CBS Sports. March 8, 2015.
  28. ^ "ACCMBB Coaches Name 2015 All-ACC Team" (Press release). Atlantic Coast Conference. March 9, 2015. Archived from the original on March 14, 2015. Retrieved March 9, 2015.
  29. ^ "ACSMA ANNOUNCES BASKETBALL POSTSEASON AWARDS, ALL-ACC TEAMS" (Press release). Atlantic Coast Conference. March 6, 2016. Archived from the original on March 7, 2016. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  30. ^ "ACC COACHES' POSTSEASON AWARDS, ALL-ACC TEAM ANNOUNCED". Atlantic Coast Conference. March 7, 2016. Archived from the original on March 8, 2016. Retrieved March 7, 2016.
  31. ^ "UNC's Justin Jackson is ACC player of the year". ACC Xtra. March 5, 2017. Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  32. ^ "ACC announces All-Conference team, postseason awards" (Press release). Atlantic Coast Conference. March 4, 2018. Retrieved March 4, 2018.
  33. ^ "Duke's Zion Williamson wins ACC honors as top player, top rookie" (Press release). greensboro.com. March 11, 2019. Retrieved March 11, 2019.
  34. ^ a b "About the ACC". theACC.com. 2009. Archived from the original on 4 February 2012. Retrieved 3 September 2009.
  35. ^ "University Of Maryland To Join The Big Ten Conference" (Press release). Big Ten Conference. November 19, 2012. Archived from the original on 2013-05-18. Retrieved November 26, 2012.
Albert King (basketball)

Albert King (born December 17, 1959) is a retired American professional basketball player. King played at Fort Hamilton High School in Brooklyn and is regarded as one of the nation's greatest high school players of all time. He was rated the top prep player in the nation over Magic Johnson and Gene Banks during his senior year. A 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) guard-forward from the University of Maryland, King was selected by the New Jersey Nets in the first round (10th overall) of the 1981 NBA draft. King played in nine NBA seasons for four teams.

Barry Parkhill

Barry Parkhill (born May 11, 1951) is a retired American professional basketball player from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania who was selected by the Portland Trail Blazers in the 1st round (15th overall) of the 1973 NBA Draft but elected to play in the American Basketball Association instead. A 6'4" (1.93 m) guard-forward from the University of Virginia, Parkhill played in three ABA seasons for two different teams. He played for the Virginia Squires and the Spirits of St. Louis.

In 2001, Parkhill was inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame.

Charlie Davis (basketball)

Not to be confused with Charles Davis (basketball), another American basketball player born in 1958.Charlie Davis (born September 7, 1949) is best known for being an outstanding college basketball player for Wake Forest University (WFU). From New york City, he was the second African American player in Wake Forest's history. Davis was the 1971 Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) Men's Basketball Player of the Year, and the first black player to win the award.

Davis garnered first-team All-ACC honors for three years in a row, and was an eighth-round NBA draft pick (120th overall) by the Cleveland Cavaliers in 1971.

Dickie Hemric

Ned Dixon "Dickie" Hemric (August 29, 1933 – August 3, 2017) was an American collegiate and professional basketball player for Wake Forest University (1952–1955) and the NBA's Boston Celtics (1955–1957).

Hemric played the first two college years at Wake Forest when the school was a member of the Southern Conference. The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) Male Athlete of the Year was created at the start of the 1954 season, and he played his last two seasons in the ACC, setting conference records for scoring and rebounding that were untouched for the first 50 years of the conference's existence. He was honored as the second recipient of the ACC Athlete of the Year in 1955. In 2002 Hemric was selected to the ACC 50th Anniversary men's basketball team, honoring the fifty greatest players in ACC history.

Hemric's ACC scoring record of 2,587 points was untouched from 1956 until it was finally broken in 2006 by Duke University's J. J. Redick and in 2009 by Tyler Hansbrough of the University of North Carolina. Hemric held the NCAA record for free throws made in a career with 905 for 54 years until it was passed by Hansbrough. Hemric still holds the Division I record for most free throw attempts (1,359) in a career.Hemric's ACC record of 1,802 career rebounds may never face a serious challenge - for four decades the nearest runner-up was his contemporary Ronnie Shavlik who is now third on the list with 1,567 rebounds from 1954 to 1956. Second is legendary NBA power forward Tim Duncan, who pulled down 1,570 rebounds at Wake Forest from 1994 to 1997. With most of today's elite ACC players leaving for the NBA before completing four seasons, it is difficult to project a scenario in which Hemric's record could ever be broken. Nationally Hemric is still fifth all-time in Division I career rebounds.

Hemric died on August 3, 2017 at his home in North Canton, Ohio nearly four weeks shy of his 84th birthday.

Jeff Mullins (basketball)

Jeffrey Vincent Mullins (born March 18, 1942) is an American retired basketball player and coach. He played college basketball with the Duke Blue Devils and in the National Basketball Association (NBA) with the St. Louis Hawks and Golden State Warriors. Mullins served as the head basketball coach at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte from 1985 to 1996.

Joseph Forte

Joseph Xavier Forte (born March 23, 1981) is an American former professional basketball player. He played two seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and was an All-American player at North Carolina.

Justin Jackson (basketball, born 1995)

Justin Aaron Jackson (born March 28, 1995) is an American professional basketball player for the Dallas Mavericks of the National Basketball Association (NBA). Jackson played basketball in the Homeschool Christian Youth Association (HCYA), he committed to play college basketball with the North Carolina Tar Heels after being rated as the 8th best player of his class by ESPN Recruiting Nation. The small forward took part in the 2014 McDonald's All-American Boys Game, and was named Co-MVP along with Jahlil Okafor.

Larry Miller (basketball player)

Lawrence James Miller (born April 4, 1946) is a retired American basketball player.

As the All-American star of his Catasauqua High School team, Miller scored 46 of his team's 66 points and grabbed 20 rebounds in a 66-62 win over Steelton High in the 1964 Pennsylvania state playoffs at the Hershey Arena.

A 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m) guard/forward born in Allentown, Pennsylvania, Miller played at the University of North Carolina during the 1960s. He earned ACC Men's Basketball Player of the Year honors in 1966 and 1967. In 2002, Miller was named to the ACC 50th Anniversary men's basketball team as one of the fifty greatest players in Atlantic Coast Conference history.

Miller was drafted in 1968 by the NBA's Philadelphia 76ers (5th round, 62nd overall pick), but never played in that league. From 1968 to 1975, he played professionally in the American Basketball Association as a member of the Los Angeles Stars, Carolina Cougars, San Diego Conquistadors, Virginia Squires, and Utah Stars. He averaged 13.6 points per game in his career and set the ABA record of 67 points in a game on March 18, 1972.Since his retirement, he works in real estate construction.

Lee Shaffer

Lee Philip Shaffer II (born February 23, 1939) is an American former professional basketball player.

A 6'7" forward born in Chicago, Shaffer starred at the University of North Carolina, where he was the ACC Men's Basketball Player of the Year in 1960.

Shaffer was the #5 selection of the Syracuse Nationals in the 1960 NBA Draft.Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame players Oscar Robertson (#1) and Jerry West (#2). He was selected ahead of future Hall of Famers Lenny Wilkins (#6) and Satch Sanders (#8).

Shaffer and another 1960 First Round Draft choice, Al Bunge (#7), signed with the AAU instead of the NBA, in an era where salaries were small. Shaffer played the 1960-1961 season with the Cleveland Pipers. He then played three seasons (1961–1964) in the National Basketball Association as a member of the Philadelphia 76ers franchise. An NBA All-Star in 1963, Shaffer held career averages of 16.8 points per game and 6.3 rebounds per game.

Len Chappell

Leonard R. Chappell (January 31, 1941 – July 12, 2018) was an American basketball player. He played for 10 years in the NBA and the ABA and was selected to one NBA All-Star Game.

Lennie Rosenbluth

Leonard Robert Rosenbluth (born January 22, 1933) is an American former basketball player and All-American at the University of North Carolina, and NBA basketball player. In college, he was Helms Foundation Player of the Year (1957), Consensus first-team All-American (1957), Second-team All-American – AP, UPI, INS (1956), Third-team All-American – NEA, Collier's (1956), ACC Player of the Year (1957), 3× First-team All-ACC (1955–1957), and had his No. 10 retired by UNC.

Lou Pucillo

Lou Pucillo (born 1936 in Philadelphia) is best known for being an outstanding college basketball player for North Carolina State University Wolfpack from 1956-1959. Being only 5 foot 9 inches and 155 lbs., he was the smallest player to ever be recruited by Everett Case. As a guard for the Wolfpack he scored 944 points in 74 games. He was named on the first-team for the ACC in 1958 and 1959, the first team for the ACC Tournament in 1958 and 1959, and in 1959 he was named ACC Player of the Year.

After graduating from N.C. State, Pucillo played for the Wichita Vickers in National Industrial League and later played for Sunbury in the Eastern Professional League. After quitting his professional basketball career, he later coached freshman basketball at N.C. State for three seasons before leaving to enter private business.

In 1991, he was inducted into the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame.

Malcolm Brogdon

Malcolm Moses Adams Brogdon (born December 11, 1992) is an American professional basketball player for the Milwaukee Bucks of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He played college basketball for the Virginia Cavaliers under Tony Bennett. As a senior in 2015–16, he was named the ACC Player of the Year and ACC Defensive Player of the Year, becoming the first player in conference history to earn both honors in the same season. He was selected in the second round of the 2016 NBA draft by the Bucks with the 36th overall pick. He went on to win the NBA Rookie of the Year Award, becoming the first second-round pick in the NBA to win the award since 1966. In 2019, Brogdon became the eighth player in NBA history to achieve a 50–40–90 season.

Mike Gminski

Michael Thomas Gminski (born August 3, 1959) is a retired American college and professional basketball player and a college basketball TV analyst for CBS Sports. In 2003, Gminski was inducted into the National Polish American Sports Hall of Fame.

Pete Brennan

Peter Joseph Brennan (September 23, 1936 – June 8, 2012) was an American basketball player.

Rod Griffin (basketball)

Rod Griffin (born June 18, 1956 in Fairmont, North Carolina) is a retired American professional basketball player. The 6'7" power forward spent four seasons playing at Wake Forest University, playing for the Wake Forest Demon Deacons. He was the 1977 ACC Player of the year. He was selected in the first round (17th pick overall) of the 1978 NBA Draft by the Denver Nuggets.

Rodney Monroe

Rodney Monroe (born April 16, 1968) is a retired American professional basketball player who played in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and other leagues. He was selected by the Atlanta Hawks in the second round (30th pick overall) of the 1991 NBA draft. A 6'3" (1.90 m) shooting guard, Monroe played only one year in the NBA with the Hawks during the 1991–92 season, appearing in 38 games and scoring a total of 131 points. Monroe also played professionally in Australia, Greece, Israel, Italy (for Carne Montana Forli (1998–1999)), Fabriano Basket a.k.a. Banca Marche Fabriano (1999–2002) and Euro Roseto (2002–2003), Spain, and the Philippines. Currently, Monroe is the director of basketball operations and men's basketball coach at SouthLake Christian Academy in Huntersville, North Carolina.Monroe played collegiately at North Carolina State and was the Atlantic a Coast Conference Player of the Year in 1991 after averaging 27.0 points per game. He broke David Thompson's school scoring record at NC State and is fourth on the ACC's all-time scoring list with 2,551 career points. In 2002, Monroe was named to the ACC 50th Anniversary men's basketball team as one of the fifty greatest players in Atlantic Coast Conference history. "Fire and Ice" was the popular nickname given to Monroe and backcourt teammate Chris Corchiani during their years with the Wolfpack.

Monroe attended St. Maria Goretti High School in Hagerstown, Maryland and played in the competitive Baltimore Catholic League.

Ronnie Shavlik

Ronald Dean Shavlik (December 4, 1933 – June 27, 1983) was an All-American center for the North Carolina State Wolfpack in the 1950s. He later played briefly for the National Basketball Association's New York Knicks. His grandson, Shavlik Randolph, played college basketball for Duke University and has played professionally in the NBA. On November 4, 2018, Shavlik was inducted into the Raleigh Hall of Fame.

Steve Vacendak

Stephen Vacendak (born August 15, 1944) is a former basketball player and coach of college basketball. He originally came from Scranton, Pennsylvania and was recruited by Vic Bubas to play as a guard for the Duke University men's basketball team. As a guard for the team he led Duke to a 72–14 record and two Final Four appearances during his three-year varsity career. In 1966 he was captain of his basketball team, ACC Player of the Year, and on the All-ACC Tournament team. Oddly enough, Vacendak was named player of the year but was not named to the All-ACC team in 1966.

Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year
Teams
Championships & awards
Seasons
Men's college basketball awards (United States)
National players of the year
Individual awards
Conference players of the year
Head coach awards
Conference coaches of the year
Division awards
Other awards

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