Athol Richardson

Athol Railton Richardson OBE, QC (15 May 1897 – 22 May 1982) was an Australian politician and judge. Richardson represented the Electoral district of Ashfield for the United Australia Party and the Liberal Party from 11 May 1935 until 5 February 1952.


Athol Richardson

Member of the New South Wales Parliament
for Ashfield
In office
11 May 1935 – 5 February 1952
Preceded byMilton Jarvie
Succeeded byJack Richardson
Personal details
Born15 May 1897
Newcastle New South Wales
Died22 May 1982
Darling Point, New South Wales, Australia
Spouse(s)Isabel McCrea Watson
ChildrenOne son, one daughter
OccupationPolitician/Lawyer

Early life

Richardson was born to parents Stephen Arthur Richardson, a Salvation Army officer, and mother Elizabeth Sarah Urquhart in Newcastle, New South Wales. Richardson jnr served in World War I in the 2nd and 4th squadrons of the Australian Flying Corps in France from 1917 till 1919. He married Isabel McCrea Watson on 23 February 1928 and had one daughter and one son.[1]

Political career

Richardson entered politics by contesting and winning the Electoral district of Ashfield for the United Australia Party at the 1935 New South Wales State election. He was subsequently re-elected to the seat of Ashfield at the 1938, 1941, 1944, 1946, 1947 and 1950 elections.

During his time in parliament he held various ministerial portfolio's including Minister for Social Services (13 October 1938 – 5 August 1939), Minister for Health (22 February 1939 – 30 June 1939), Minister for Labour and Industry (26 June 1939 – 5 August 1939) and Colonial Treasurer (16 August 1939 – 16 May 1941). He was also Deputy Leader of the Opposition for 1941 until 1945.[1]

Richardson retired from politics upon his appointment to the Supreme Court of New South Wales in 1952. During his judicial tenure, Richardson remained a member of the Liberal Party; Tom Hughes QC describes him as a man of 'orderly habits', but criticises him as 'a well-meaning man who gained marks only for sincerity and effort'.[2] Richardson retired from the bench in 1967.

Death and honours

Richardson died on 22 May 1982, at Darling Point, New South Wales, Australia.[1]

Honours received

References

  1. ^ a b c "The Hon. Athol Railton Richardson (1897-1982)". Former Members of the Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 13 May 2019.
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 6 March 2011. Retrieved 2011-01-13.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
New South Wales Legislative Assembly
Preceded by
Milton Jarvie
Member for Ashfield
1938 – 1952
Succeeded by
Jack Richardson
Political offices
Preceded by
Herbert Hawkins
Minister for Social Services
1938 – 1939
Succeeded by
George Gollan
Preceded by
Herbert FitzSimons
Minister for Health
1939
Succeeded by
Herbert FitzSimons
Preceded by
Herbert Hawkins
Minister for Labour and Industry
1939
Succeeded by
George Gollan
Preceded by
Alexander Mair
Colonial Treasurer of New South Wales
1939 – 1941
Succeeded by
William McKell
Party political offices
Preceded by
Bertram Stevens
Deputy Leader of the United Australia Party
1941 – 1943
Party disbanded
New political party Deputy Leader of the New South Wales Liberal Party
1945 – 1946
Succeeded by
Vernon Treatt
Alexander Mair

Alexander Mair (25 August 1889 – 3 August 1969) was an Australian politician and served as the Premier of New South Wales from 5 August 1939 to 16 May 1941. Born in Melbourne, Mair worked in various businesses there before moving to Albury, New South Wales where he went on to be a member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly for fourteen years. In 1932, Mair was elected to the seat of Albury and was re-elected a further four times. He rose quickly through the cabinet of Bertram Stevens' United Australia Party government, becoming an Assistant Minister in April 1938, Minister for Labour and Industry in June and Colonial Treasurer in October.A staunch supporter of Stevens throughout his Premiership, Mair became his successor as Premier in August 1939 following Stevens' defeat in a no-confidence motion moved by renegade Minister, Eric Spooner. Becoming Premier at a difficult time for the government, Mair's leadership was marked by his unification of his formerly fractious party, the reining-in of government expenditure and increased taxes to reduce debt, and new labor laws to reduce unemployment. When the Second World War broke out in September 1939, Mair mobilised the state towards the war effort but found it difficult to communicate his message to the voters. He served as Premier until losing the May 1941 election to the Labor Party under William McKell, losing 20 seats.Remaining as Opposition Leader, with the UAP shattered, Mair became leader of the new Democratic Party and was involved in the negotiations to unite the broken conservative parties and form the Liberal Party in 1945. When Reginald Weaver died in November 1945, only months after becoming the first leader of the Liberal Party in New South Wales, Mair was selected to succeed him. Mair remained as leader until he resigned in March 1946 to contest the Australian Senate. He was unsuccessful and thereafter retired back to Melbourne, where he died in 1969, aged 79.

Candidates of the 1938 New South Wales state election

This is a list of candidates for the 1938 New South Wales state election. The election was held on 26 March 1938.

Electoral district of Ashfield

Ashfield was an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly in the Australian state of New South Wales, first created in 1894 with the abolition of multi-member electoral districts from part of Canterbury, and named after the Sydney suburb of Ashfield. It was abolished in 1920, with the introduction of proportional representation and absorbed into Western Suburbs. It was recreated in 1927 and, in 1959, it was partly combined with Croydon and renamed Ashfield-Croydon. In 1968, Ashfield-Croydon was replaced by Ashfield, which was abolished again in 1999.

Electoral results for the Division of Parkes (1901–69)

This is a list of electoral results for the Division of Parkes (1901–69) in Australian federal elections from the division's creation in 1901 until its abolition in 1969.

Eric Spooner

Eric Sydney Spooner (2 March 1891 – 3 June 1952) was an Australian politician.

Everyman's Welfare Service

Everyman's Welfare Service (also simply called Everyman's and formerly known as Campaigners for Christ, Campaigners, or C4C) is a parachurch organization that was founded in 1936 in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. It provides opportunities for recreation to members of the military, operating recreation centres on most Australian Defence Force bases. It is affiliated with the National Young Life Campaign of England. As Campaigners for Christ, the organization engaged in open-air preaching and ran a centre in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. C4C owned a room in a building opposite Adelaide railway station in which they engaged in evangelism. Athol Richardson served as the C4C president during World War II. Evangelist Frank Jenner partnered with C4C, although he was not officially part of the organization. Eventually, the organization was renamed "Everyman's Welfare Service" in reference to Colossians 1:28.

George Gollan

George Charles Gollan (17 April 1886 – 4 January 1957) was an Australian politician and a member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly from 1932 until 1953 . He was variously a member of the United Australia Party (UAP), Democratic Party and Liberal Party. He held numerous ministerial positions between 1937 and 1941 and was the United Australia Party whip between 1935 and 1937.

Jack Richardson (politician)

Jack Frederick Richardson (23 September 1921 – 3 June 2011) was an Australian politician. He was a member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly for 6 months in 1952-3 and a member of the Labor Party.

Richardson was born in Ashfield, New South Wales, the son of a railway employee. He was educated at the Law School of the University of Sydney and admitted as a solicitor in 1952. During the Second World War, Richardson served with the Royal Australian Air Force in an anti-aircraft battery between 1941 and 1945.

Richardson was elected to the New South Wales Parliament as the Labor member for Ashfield at the 1952 by-election caused by the resignation of the sitting Liberal member Athol Richardson who had accepted a position as a judge of the Supreme Court of New South Wales. He lost the seat at the state election held in 1953. He did not hold ministerial, parliamentary or party office and retired from public life.He married Roma Bezant Conlon in 1956 and she died in 1981. He had an only daughter Ann Frances born in 1958. In 1982 He married Diana, Baroness von Kohorn zu Kornegg. She was the granddaughter of former premier John Storey.

Liberal Party of Australia (New South Wales Division)

The Liberal Party of Australia (New South Wales Division), commonly known as the New South Wales Liberals, is the state division of the Liberal Party of Australia in New South Wales. The party currently governs in New South Wales in coalition with the National Party of Australia (NSW). The party is part of the federal Liberal Party which governs nationally in Coalition with the National Party of Australia.

The party traces its roots to August 1944, when the Democratic Party and Liberal Democratic Party, which had both emerged from the remains of the NSW branch of the United Australia Party, merged as the United Democratic Party. A year later, with the formation of the federal Liberal Party, the UDP became the NSW branch of the new party.

In the 66 years since its foundation the party has won seven state elections to the Labor Party's 13, and has spent 20 years in office (1965 to 1976, 1988 to 1995 and 2011 to the present) to Labor's 46. Eight leaders have become Premier of New South Wales; of those, five, Sir Robert Askin, Nick Greiner, Barry O'Farrell, Mike Baird and Gladys Berejiklian, have won at least one state election.

Mair–Bruxner ministry

The Mair–Bruxner ministry or Mair ministry was the 49th ministry of the New South Wales Government, and was led by the 26th Premier, the Honourable Alexander Mair, MLA, in a United Australia Party coalition with the Country Party, that was led by the Honourable Lieutenant-Colonel Michael Bruxner, DSO, MLA. The ministry was the only occasion when the Government was led by Stevens, as Premier; and fourth and final occasion where Bruxner served as Deputy Premier.

Mair was first elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly in 1932 and served continuously until 1946. Having served as a junior minister in the third Stevens ministry and subsequently promoted, Mair was elected leader of the United Australia Party (UAP) in New South Wales as a result of a no confidence motion against the 25th Premier, Bertram Stevens, for not running a balanced budget. Stevens resigned as Premier and Leader of the UAP and Mair won the leadership ballot and hence became Premier. Bruxner was first elected to the Assembly in 1920 and served continuously until 1962. Initially a member of the Progressive Party, he served as party leader in opposition between 1922 and 1925; and resumed leadership in 1932, following the resignation of his successor, Ernest Buttenshaw. By this stage, the party was renamed as the Country Party.

The Mair formed a coalition with Bruxner, taking over where Stevens was previously in coalition with the Country Party.

This ministry covers the period from 5 August 1939 until 16 May 1941 when the 1941 state election saw the defeat of the Mair–Bruxner coalition, and the Labor Party under the leadership of William McKell elected to government.

Members of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly, 1935–1938

This is a list of members of the 31st New South Wales Legislative Assembly from 1935 to 1938, as elected at the 1935 state election.

1 Gordon UAP MLA Thomas Bavin retired to take an appointment as a judge of the Supreme Court of New South Wales. UAP candidate Philip Goldfinch won the resulting by-election on 23 November (unopposed).

2 Vaucluse UAP MLA William Foster died on 21 July 1936. Independent UAP candidate Murray Robson won the resulting by-election on 29 August.

3 Woollahra MLA Daniel Levy died on 20 May 1937. Independent UAP candidate Harold Mason won the resulting by-election on 26 June.

4 Gordon MLA Philip Goldfinch resigned on 5 July 1937 citing a heavy commitment to business interests. Independent UAP candidate Harry Turner won the resulting by-election on 7 August 1937.

5 Corowa Country MLA Richard Ball died on 30 October 1937. Independent candidate Christopher Lethbridge won the resulting by-election on 11 December.

Members of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly, 1941–1944

This is a list of members of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly from 1941 to 1944, as elected at the 1941 state election.

During this term, the opposition United Australia Party merged with the new Commonwealth Party to form the Democratic Party in late 1943. The merger was only at a state level, however; the federal United Australia Party, however, remained intact during this period.

1 Murrumbidgee MLA George Enticknap was elected as an Independent Labor candidate, defeating the endorsed Labor candidate, but was readmitted by the party soon after his election.

2 Dubbo Country Party MLA George Wilson died on 24 April 1942. Labor candidate Clarrie Robertson won the resulting by-election on 6 June.

3 South Coast independent MLA Rupert Beale died on 28 September 1942. His son, independent candidate Jack Beale, won the resulting by-election on 14 November.

4 Willoughby UAP MLA Edward Sanders died on 10 July 1943. UAP candidate George Brain won the resulting by-election on 25 September.

5 Lachlan Country Party MLA Griffith Evans died on 16 August 1943. Labor candidate John Chanter won the resulting by-election on 25 September.

6 Auburn MLA Jack Lang was expelled from the Labor Party in 1943 and sat as a Lang Labor candidate thereafter, in the final Lang Labor split. Unlike the previous Labor schisms, however, all of his parliamentary colleagues in this parliament remained in the official Labor Party.

7 Lang resigned on 15 July 1943 to contest the federal seat of Reid at the 1943 election, but lost the federal contest, and contested and won the by-election for his state seat on 2 October.

Members of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly, 1944–1947

This is a list of members of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly from 1944 to 1947, as elected at the 1944 state election:

The opposition Democratic Party merged into the nascent Liberal Party in late 1944, becoming the New South Wales branch of the new party.

1 Manly MLA Alfred Reid and Nepean MLA Joseph Jackson were re-elected in 1944 as Independent Democrat candidates; Reid after losing preselection and Jackson after refusing Democratic endorsement. Both later joined the new Liberal Party. A third Independent Democrat, Sydney Storey, joined the Liberal Party in 1946.

2 Oxley MLA Les Jordan had won his seat as an Independent Country candidate against independent George Mitchell at the 1944 state election. He had been previously refused endorsement due to the party's refusal to officially challenge MLAs who, like Mitchell, were serving in World War II; upon his election, he was admitted to the Country Party caucus.

3 Tamworth MLA Bill Chaffey was elected as an independent, but joined the Country Party during this term.

4 The Independent Democrat member for Ryde, James Shand died on 21 December 1944. Liberal candidate Eric Hearnshaw won the resulting by-election on 3 February 1945 in the first electoral test for the new conservative party.

5 Blacktown Labor MLA Frank Hill died on 11 July 1945. Labor candidate John Freeman won the resulting by-election on 18 August 1945.

6 Manly Liberal MLA Alfred Reid died on 5 August 1945. Liberal candidate Douglas Darby won the resulting by-election on 15 September.

7 Neutral Bay Liberal MLA Reginald Weaver died on 12 November 1945. Liberal candidate Ivan Black won the resulting by-election on 15 December.

8 Goulburn Labor MLA Jack Tully resigned on 9 May 1946. His son, Labor candidate Laurie Tully won the resulting by-election on 1 June.

9 Albury Liberal MLA Alexander Mair resigned on 14 August 1946 in order to contest a seat in the Australian Senate at the 1946 federal election. Labor candidate John Hurley won the resulting by-election on 9 November.

10 Auburn Lang Labor MLA Jack Lang resigned on 15 August 1946 in order to contest the federal seat of Reid at the 1946 federal election. His son, Lang Labor candidate James Lang, won the resulting by-election on 9 November.

11 Ashfield Liberal MLA Athol Richardson resigned on 16 August 1946 in order to contest the federal seat of Parkes at the 1946 federal election. He lost the federal contest, and recontested and won the by-election for his state seat on 9 November.

12 Corowa MLA Christopher Lethbridge was elected as an independent, but joined the Liberal Party in 1946. He subsequently resigned on 16 August 1946 in order to contest the federal seat of Riverina at the 1946 federal election. Lethbridge contested the by-election for his old seat as the Liberal candidate on 9 November, but lost to Country Party candidate Ebenezer Kendell.

Members of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly, 1950–1953

This is a list of members of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly from 1950 to 1953, as elected at the 1950 state election:

1 Monaro MLA John Seiffert won re-election in 1950 as an independent after being expelled prior to the election, but was readmitted to the Labor caucus.

2 Burwood Liberal MLA Gordon Jackett died on 3 March 1951. Liberal candidate Leslie Parr won the resulting by-election on 2 June 1951.

3 Neutral Bay Liberal MLA Ivan Black resigned on 20 March 1951 in order to contest preselection for the federal seat of Warringah at the 1951 election. He was unsuccessful, and was re-elected unopposed to his state seat on 21 May 1951.

4 Liverpool Labor MLA James McGirr resigned to take up an appointment as chair of the Maritime Services Board on 3 April 1952. Labor candidate Jack Mannix won the resulting by-election on 24 May.

5 Ashfield Liberal MLA Athol Richardson resigned on 29 April 1952 in order to take up an appointment to the Supreme Court of New South Wales. Labor candidate Jack Richardson won the resulting by-election on 28 June.

6 Hartley MLA Jim Chalmers resigned from the Labor Party in 1952 after a dispute with the party's state executive. He served out his term as an independent.

Milton Jarvie

Milton Livingstone Fredericks Jarvie, (12 July 1891 – 31 January 1965) was an Australian politician, businessman and soldier.

Jarvie was born at Pyramul, south of Mudgee, New South Wales, to schoolteacher John Rose Shaw Jarvie and Jean Wade, née Fredericks. He attended Enmore High School and the University of Sydney, receiving a Diploma of Economics. Around 1914 he married Geraldine James. From 1915 to 1920 he served in the Australian Imperial Force's Provost Corps in the First World War, rising to the rank of major and being decorated with the Military Cross. For his later service with the Citizens Military Force, Jarvie received the Efficiency Decoration. After the war he became a business manager and an executive officer with the British Australasian Tobacco Company. In 1925 he was elected to Marrickville Council, on which he served until 1927 (he was also mayor in 1927).In 1925, Jarvie was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly as one of the Nationalist members for Western Suburbs. When single-member districts were re-introduced in 1927 he represented Ashfield, holding the seat until 1935, when he lost United Australia Party preselection. Jarvie contested the election unsuccessfully as an independent. From 1937 he was an executive officer with the Sound Proof Company, and during the Second World War he served as war area officer for Southern New South Wales. After the war (1945–47), he was director of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, Displaced Persons Camp in southern Austria. He married Helen Michell in 1949. Jarvie died in 1965 at Concord, New South Wales.

Stevens–Bruxner ministry (1938–39)

The Stevens–Bruxner ministry (1938–1939) or Third Stevens–Bruxner ministry or Third Stevens ministry was the 48th ministry of the New South Wales Government, and was led by the 25th Premier, the Honourable Bertram Stevens, MLA, in a United Australia Party coalition with the Country Party, that was led by the Honourable Lieutenant-Colonel Michael Bruxner, DSO, MLA. The ministry was the third of three occasions when the Government was led by Stevens, as Premier; and third of four occasions where Bruxner served as Deputy Premier.

Stevens was first elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly in 1927 and served continuously until 1940. Having served as a senior minister in the Bavin ministry, following the defeat of the Nationalist coalition led by Bavin, who was in poor health, at the 1932 state election, Stevens was elected leader of the newly formed United Australia Party (UAP) in New South Wales and became Opposition Leader. Bruxner was first elected to the Assembly in 1920 and served continuously until 1962. Initially a member of the Progressive Party, he served as party leader in opposition between 1922 and 1925; and resumed leadership in 1932, following the resignation of his successor, Ernest Buttenshaw. By this stage, the party was renamed as the Country Party.

The Stevens–Bruxner coalition came to power as a result of the Lang Dismissal Crisis, when the Governor of New South Wales, Philip Game used the reserve power of The Crown to remove Jack Lang as Premier, asking Stevens to form government. Going to the pollls a month later, Stevens/Bruxner won a landslide victory at the 1932 state election and were re-elected at the 1935 and 1938 state elections, albeit with reduced margins.

This ministry covers the period from 13 April 1938 until 5 August 1939 when the deputy leader of the UAP, Eric Spooner resigned from cabinet and on 1 August 1939, moved a no confidence motion against Stevens for not running a balanced budget. Stevens resigned as Premier and Leader of the UAP, and was succeeded by Alexander Mair, who formed a coalition with Bruxner.

Treasurer of New South Wales

The Treasurer of New South Wales, known from 1856 to 1959 as the Colonial Treasurer of New South Wales, is the minister in the Government of New South Wales responsible for government expenditure and revenue raising and is the head of the New South Wales Treasury. The Treasurer plays a key role in the economic policy of the government.

The current Treasurer, since 30 January 2017, is The Honourable Dominic Perrottet . The Treasurer is assisted in his portfolio by the Deputy Premier, Minister for Regional New South Wales, Industry and Trade, currently The Hon. John Barilaro ; the Minister for Jobs, Investment, Tourism and Western Sydney, currently The Hon. Stuart Ayres ; and the Minister for Finance and Small Business, currently The Hon. Damien Tudehope MLC, all appointed with effect from 2 April 2019.Each year, the Treasurer presents the NSW Budget to the Parliament. In some other countries the equivalent role is the Minister for Finance, although NSW has had a separate office of that name responsible for regulating government spending. For 103 years the Treasurer was originally known as the 'Colonial Treasurer', however the 'Colonial' word was removed with the passing of the Ministers of the Crown Act 1959 (NSW) from 1 April 1959.Treasurers Forster, Stuart, Dibbs, Jennings, Reid, Lyne, Waddell, Carruthers, McGowen, Holman, Fuller, Lang, Bavin, Stevens, Mair, McKell, McGirr, Cahill, Heffron, Renshaw, Askin, Lewis, Willis, Wran, Greiner, Fahey and Iemma were also Premier during some or all of their period as Treasurer. By convention, the Treasurer is usually a member of the New South Wales Parliament with a seat in the Legislative Assembly. The exception to this were Treasurers Egan, Costa and Roozendaal, who were members of the Legislative Council during their tenure as Treasurer.

The Treasurer administers his portfolio responsibilities through The Treasury cluster, and in particular The Treasury and a range of other government agencies.

Vernon Treatt

Sir Vernon Haddon Treatt (15 May 1897 – 20 September 1984) was an Australian lawyer, soldier, Rhodes Scholar and politician. Born in Singleton, New South Wales and educated at Shore School, Treatt interrupted his studies at the University of Sydney to enlist at the outbreak of the First World War. Serving in the Royal Australian Artillery, Treatt served in France and was awarded the Military Medal. Upon returning to Australia he was awarded a Rhodes scholarship and further educated at New College, Oxford.

After briefly practising law in 1923 in Britain, Treatt returned to Australia and was admitted to the New South Wales bar that same year, serving as a Crown Prosecutor at the supreme court. Treatt also was the Challis law lecturer at the University of Sydney. Treatt entered the New South Wales Legislative Assembly on 26 March 1938, representing the Electoral district of Woollahra for the United Australia Party (UAP). When UAP Premier Bertram Stevens was ousted from the leadership in August 1939 and Alexander Mair became Premier, Mair appointed Treatt, after serving only a few months in Parliament, as the Minister for Justice. He served in this office until the UAP lost power in 1941.

During this time Treatt witnessed the break-up of the UAP into the various parties including the Democratic Party, which he joined, and then the establishment of the Liberal Party of Australia as the major conservative political force in Australia in 1945. When the second leader of the party, Alexander Mair, resigned in March 1946, Treatt was elected to succeed him. As the third leader of the new party, Treatt became the first leader to contest an election. After serving eight years and almost winning government at the 1950 election, Treatt resigned as Leader in August 1954 following a July attempt to depose him. He continued as a member of parliament until he was defeated in 1962 and thereafter served in various organisations and posts, including as a Chief Commissioner of the City of Sydney in 1969, until his death in 1984.

William Peters (Australian politician)

William Charles (Bill) Peters (15 April 1903 – 21 February 1978) was an Australian politician and a member of the New South Wales Legislative Council between 1959 and 1978. He was a member of the Labor Party (ALP).

Peters began his working life as a hatter and joined the Felt Hatters Union when he was 16 years old. His union interest eventually overtook his career as a hatter and he was secretary of the union for 36 years from 1936 to 1972.

In 1947, he contested the state seat of Ashfield for the Labor Party but was defeated by the incumbent Liberal Athol Richardson. Six years later he was elected to Ashfield Council where he served for 24 years including two years as mayor from 1962 to 1964.

In 1959, George Neilly resigned his seat in the Legislative Council to contest the lower house seat of Cessnock. Peters won the nomination for the vacant seat and held his place until his death. He did not hold ministerial office.

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