Athletic Park (Duluth)

Athletic Park is a former baseball and American football stadium located in Duluth, Minnesota. Constructed in 1903, the park was the home of the Duluth White Sox (1903-1916, 1934) and the Duluth Dukes (1935-1940). The stadium was also home to the Duluth Kelleys/Eskimos of the National Football League (1923–1926). It had a capacity of 6,000 spectators.[1] It was demolished and replaced by Wade Stadium in 1941.

Athletic Park
LocationDuluth, Minnesota
OwnerDuluth, Minnesota
Capacity6,000 (American football)
SurfaceGrass
Construction
Built1903
Opened1903
Closed1940
Demolished1941
Tenants
Duluth Kelleys/Eskimos (NFL) (1923-1926)
Duluth White Sox (MiLB (1903-1916, 1934)
Duluth Dukes (MiLB) (1935-1940)

References

  1. ^ http://members.cox.net/bngolden1/footballprofiles4.htm

Coordinates: 46°45′21.9″N 92°08′45.2″W / 46.756083°N 92.145889°W

Athletic Park

Athletic Park can refer to many places, including:

In the United StatesAthletic Park (Buffalo), also known as Luna Park and Carnival Court

Athletic Park (Duluth)

Athletic Park (Greensburg)

Athletic Park (Indianapolis)

Athletic Park (Kansas City)

Athletic Park (Los Angeles)

Athletic Park (Milwaukee)

Athletic Park (Minneapolis)

Athletic Park (Nashville), also known as Sulphur Dell

Athletic Park (New Orleans)

Athletic Park (Omaha)

Athletic Park (Philadelphia)

Athletic Park (St. Paul)

Athletic Park (Syracuse), also known as Star Park

Athletic Park (Washington)

Athletic Park (Wausau)In New ZealandAthletic Park, WellingtonIn CanadaAthletic Park (Medicine Hat)

Athletic Park (Vancouver)

Sports in Minnesota

Sports in Minnesota include professional teams in all major sports, Olympic Games contenders and medalists, especially in the Winter Olympics, collegiate teams in major and small-school conferences and associations and active amateur teams and individual sports. The State of Minnesota has a team in all five major professional leagues (Major League Baseball, National Football League, National Basketball Association, National Hockey League and Major League Soccer). Along with professional sports, there are numerous collegiate teams including the University of Minnesota Golden Gophers in the NCAA Division I, Minnesota State Mavericks in NCAA Division I and NCAA Division II and many others across the Minnesota public and private colleges and universities.

Franchise
Stadium
Lore
Head coaches
Owners
Seasons
Defunct stadiums of the National Football League
Early era:
19201940
Merger era:
19411970
Current era:
1971–present
Stadiums
used by
NFL teams
temporarily

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.