Atheneum Books

Atheneum Books was a New York City publishing house established in 1959 by Alfred A. Knopf, Jr., Simon Michael Bessie and Hiram Haydn. Simon & Schuster has owned Atheneum properties since its acquisition of Macmillan in 1994 and it created Atheneum Books for Young Readers as an imprint for children's books in the 2000s.

Atheneum Books
Parent companySimon & Schuster
Founded1959
FounderAlfred A. Knopf, Jr., Simon Michael Bessie and Hiram Haydn
Country of originUnited States
Headquarters locationNew York City
Publication typesBooks
Fiction genresChildren's literature
ImprintsCaitlyn Dlouhy Books
Official websitesimonandschusterpublishing.com/atheneum/

History

Alfred A. Knopf, Jr. left his family publishing house Alfred A. Knopf and created Atheneum Books in 1959 with Simon Michael Bessie (Harpers) and Hiram Haydn (Random House).[1][a] It became the publisher of Pulitzer Prize winners Edward Albee, Charles Johnson, James Merrill, Mona Van Duyn and Theodore H. White. It also published Ernest Gaines' first book Catherine Carmier (1964). Knopf personally recruited editor Jean E. Karl to establish a Children's Book Department in 1961.[2][3] Atheneum acquired the reprint house Russell & Russell in 1965.[4]

Atheneum merged with Charles Scribner's Sons to become The Scribner Book Company in 1978. The acquisition included Rawson Associates. Scribner was acquired by Macmillan in 1984. Macmillan was purchased by Simon & Schuster in 1994.[5]

In the 2000s, the Simon & Schuster imprint Atheneum Books for Young Readers has published the popular May Bird fantasy series for young adults, inaugurated by May Bird and the Ever After (2005), and the Olivia series of picture books featuring Olivia the pig (from 2000). The Higher Power of Lucky won the 2007 Newbery Medal. In a 2007 online poll, the National Education Association named Bunnicula: A Rabbit-Tale of Mystery one of its Teachers' Top 100 Books for Children.[6]

Notes

  1. ^ For a detailed description of how Atheneum Publishers came into existence, see Hiram Haydn's memoir: Words & Faces: an intimate chronicle of book and magazine publishing (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1974), pp. 105–40.

References

  1. ^ Lehmann-Haupt, Christopher (February 16, 2009). "Alfred A. Knopf Jr., Influential Publisher, Dies at 90". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 2009-04-18. Retrieved 2009-02-22. Alfred A. Knopf Jr., who left the noted publishing house run by his parents to become one of the founders of Atheneum Publishers in 1959, died on Saturday. He was 90, the last of the surviving founders, and lived in New York City.
  2. ^ Jalowitz, Alan (Summer 2006). "Karl, Jean (Edna)" Archived 2012-05-07 at the Wayback Machine. Pennsylvania Center for the Book. Penn State University. Retrieved 2011-10-21.
  3. ^ Palmquist, Vicki (July 29 [no year]). "Birthday Bios: Jean E. Karl" Archived 2012-05-15 at the Wayback Machine. Children's literature network. (c) 2002–2008. Retrieved 2011-10-21.
  4. ^ Publishers Weekly, Volume 201, 1972.
  5. ^ "Description [Scribner history]". Simon & Schuster. 2007. Archived from the original on 2009-01-30. Retrieved 2009-02-22. In 1978 Scribner acquired Atheneum, publishers of Edward Albee, Charles Johnson, and Theodore H. White. The Atheneum acquisition also brought with it the Rawson Associates imprint. And in 1984, the Scribner Book Companies, which by then included a great children's division and a distinguished reference division, merged with Macmillan.
  6. ^ National Education Association (2007). "Teachers' Top 100 Books for Children". Retrieved 2012-08-19.

External links

Aladdin Paperbacks

Aladdin Paperbacks is one of several children's-book imprints owned by Simon & Schuster.

It was established by Jean E. Karl at Atheneum Books where she was the founding director of the children's department (1961). Atheneum merged with or was acquired by Scribner's in 1978, then MacMillan in 1984, before the acquisition by Simon & Schuster in 1994.There may have been previous uses of 'Aladdin' as a brand name in the book industry.

Andrew Clements

Andrew Clements (born May 29, 1949) is an American writer of many children's books. His debut novel Frindle won annual book awards determined by the vote of U.S. schoolchildren in about twenty different U.S. states. In June 2015 it was named the Phoenix Award winner for 2016 as the best book that did not win a major award when it was published in 1996.

Betsy Lewin

Betsy Reilly Lewin (born May 12, 1937) is an American illustrator from Clearfield, Pennsylvania.

She studied illustration at Pratt Institute. After graduation, she began designing greeting cards. She began writing and illustrating stories for children's magazines and eventually children's books. She is married to children's book illustrator Ted Lewin and with him has co-written and illustrated several books about their travels to remote places, including Uganda in Gorilla Walk and Mongolia in Horse Song, as well as How to Babysit a Leopard: and Other True Stories from Our Travels Across Six Continents (Roaring Brook Press, 2015). She is arguably best known for the Caldecott Honor Book Click Clack Moo: Cows that Type.

Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs

Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs is a children's book written by Judi Barrett and illustrated by Ron Barrett. It was first published in 1978 by the Simon & Schuster imprint Atheneum Books, followed by a 1982 trade paperback edition from sister company Aladdin Paperbacks. Based on a 2007 online poll, the National Education Association named the book one of its "Teachers' Top 100 Books for Children". It was one of the "Top 100 Picture Books" of all time in a 2012 poll by School Library Journal.A sequel, Pickles to Pittsburgh, was published in 2000 by Atheneum Books; a hardcover edition followed in 2009. A second sequel, Planet of the Pies, was published on August 27, 2013.

Daniel Half Human

Daniel Half Human and the Good Nazi is a 2000 young adult literature novel by German author David Chotjewitz, translated into English by Doris Orgel. The first US edition was published in 2004 by Atheneum Books for Young Readers. The novel is set in Hamburg, Germany in flashback and forward between 1945 at the end of World War II and in the 1930s, during the rise of the National Socialist (Nazi) party. It deals with the effects of antisemitism on two friends. It has been cited in 16 award lists, including as a Mildred L. Batchelder Honor Book.

Dragondrums

Dragondrums is a young adult science fiction novel by the American-Irish author Anne McCaffrey. Published by Atheneum Books in 1979, it was the sixth to appear in the Dragonriders of Pern series by Anne or her son Todd McCaffrey.Dragondrums completed the Harper Hall of Pern trilogy one year after The White Dragon completed the Dragonriders of Pern trilogy.

Boxed and omnibus editions of both trilogies soon followed.

Dragonsinger

Dragonsinger is a young adult science fiction novel by the American-Irish author Anne McCaffrey. Published by Atheneum Books in 1977, it was the fourth to appear in the Dragonriders of Pern series written by Anne McCaffrey and her son Todd McCaffrey.As the sequel to Dragonsong, it was the second book in the Harper Hall of Pern trilogy, with a new publisher, editor, and target audience (young adults). The original Dragonriders of Pern trilogy was completed after publication of the first two Harper Hall books.

Dragonsong

Dragonsong is a science fantasy novel by the American-Irish author Anne McCaffrey. Released by Atheneum Books in March 1976, it was the third to appear set on the world Pern of the Dragonriders of Pern. In its time, however, Dragonsong brought the fictional planet Pern to a new publisher, editor, and target audience of young adults, and soon became the first book in the Harper Hall of Pern trilogy. The original Dragonriders of Pern trilogy with Ballantine Books was not completed until after the publication of Dragonsong and its sequel.Dragonsong and the second Pern book Dragonquest are set at the same time, seven years after the end of the seminal Dragonflight — that is, more than 2500 years after human settlement, during the "Ninth Pass" of the Red Star that periodically brings a biological menace from space. Their primary geographical settings are not distant in space yet worlds apart: Dragonsong in an isolated sea-hold and Dragonquest at the centers of Pernese society, the weyrs and major holds, especially Benden Weyr. Near the end of Dragonsong, the protagonist Menolly is rescued by a dragonrider, and the action converges with that of Dragonquest.

Earthsea

Earthsea, also known as The Earthsea Cycle, is a series of fantasy books written by the American writer Ursula K. Le Guin and the name of their setting, a world of islands surrounded by an uncharted ocean. There are six Earthsea books written between 1968 and 2001, beginning with A Wizard of Earthsea and continuing with The Tombs of Atuan, The Farthest Shore, Tehanu, Tales from Earthsea, and The Other Wind. Unusually for a series, Tales from Earthsea is a short story collection; the rest are novels. There are also four additional short stories not in Tales from Earthsea.

Illustrators have included Pauline Ellison, Ruth Robbins, Anne Yvonne Gilbert, Gail Garraty, Margaret Chodos-Irvine, Kelly Nelson, Marion Wood Kolisch, Ursula K. Le Guin, Charles Vess and Cliff Nielsen.

In 2018, all the novels and short stories were published as The Books of Earthsea: The Complete Illustrated Edition.

Handles (novel)

Handles is a realistic children's novel by Jan Mark, first published in 1983 by Kestrel Books of Harmondsworth, London, with illustrations by David Parkins. Set in the Norfolk countryside, it features a city girl on holiday, who loves motorcycles. Nicholas Tucker calls it "a happy, optimistic work"; Erica escapes "mean-minded relatives" for the "anarchic motorbike-repair outfit in a nearby town".Mark and Handles won the annual Carnegie Medal from the Library Association, recognising the year's best children's book by a British subject. Thus she became the third writer with two such honors (of seven through 2012), having won the 1976 Medal for her debut novel Thunder and Lightnings. Also set in the Norfolk countryside, it features two boys who love aeroplanes.

Atheneum Books published the first U.S. edition in 1985, retaining the Parkins illustrations.

Jean E. Karl

Jean Edna Karl (July 29, 1927 in Chicago, Illinois – March 30, 2000 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania) was an American book editor who specialized in children's and science fiction titles. She founded and led the children's division and young adult and science fiction imprints at Atheneum Books, where she oversaw or edited books that won two Caldecott Medals and five Newbery Medals. One of the Newberys went to the new writer E. L. Konigsburg in 1968 for From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler.

Jennifer, Hecate, Macbeth, William McKinley, and Me, Elizabeth

Jennifer, Hecate, Macbeth, William McKinley, and Me, Elizabeth is a children's novel by E. L. Konigsburg. It was published by Atheneum Books in 1967 and next year in the UK by Macmillan under the title Jennifer, Hecate, Macbeth and Me.Jennifer, Hecate was the author's first book published, the same year as her second book From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler. Mixed-Up Files won the 1968 Newbery Medal and Jennifer, Hecate won a Newbery Honor, making Konigsburg the only person to win both citations in one year.

She had submitted both manuscripts to editor Jean E. Karl, who accepted both.

Mary Anderson (author)

Mary Anderson (born January 20, 1939) is an American author of mystery novels for children and young adults, the majority published by Atheneum Books, New York City.

May Bird and the Ever After

May Bird and the Ever After is a fantasy/action young adult novel by Jodi Lynn Anderson. It was released in 2005 and is the first book in the May Bird series. It was published by Atheneum Books.

Nancy Farmer

Nancy Farmer is an American author of children's and young adult books and science fiction. She has written three Newbery Honor Books and won the U.S. National Book Award for Young People's Literature for The House of the Scorpion, published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers in 2002.

The Harper Hall Trilogy

The Harper Hall trilogy is a series of three science fiction novels by the American-Irish author Anne McCaffrey.

They are part of the Dragonriders of Pern series as it is known today, 24 books by Anne or her son Todd McCaffrey as of summer 2011.

They were published by Atheneum Books in 1976, 1977, and 1979, alongside the Dragonriders of Pern series. Omnibus editions of the two trilogies were published by the Doubleday Science Fiction Book Club in 1978 and 1984, titled The Dragonriders of Pern and The Harper Hall of Pern respectively.Harper Hall's target was young adults

in contrast to the general audience for fantasy and science fiction. Indeed, editor Jean E. Karl, who had established the children's and science fiction imprints at Atheneum Books,

hoped to attract more female readers to science fiction and solicited "a story for young women in a different part of Pern". McCaffrey delivered Dragonsong and they contracted for a sequel before it was out.

The Thanksgiving Story

The Thanksgiving Story, written by Alice Dalgliesh and illustrated by Helen Sewell, is a 1954 picture book published by Demco Media and Charles Scribner's Sons. The Thanksgiving Story was the runner-up for the Caldecott Medal for 1955 and is a Caldecott Honor Medal book. The Thanksgiving Story was reprinted in paperback by Aladdin Paperbacks in 1985 and reissued in hardcover by Atheneum Books for Young Readers in 1988.

The View from Saturday

The View from Saturday is a children's novel by E. L. Konigsburg, published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers in 1996.

It won the 1997 Newbery Medal for excellence in American children's literature, the author's second Medal.

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