Assyrian calendar

The Assyrian calendar is a solar calendar which begins in the year 4750 BC, begun by the internal date of the foundation of Assur. [1][2] The year begins with the first sight of Spring. The Assyrian new year is still celebrated every year with festivals and gatherings. As of April 2019 AD, it is the 6769th year of the Assyrian calendar, and this calendar is used among many Assyrian communities.

It begins 4,750 years before the Gregorian calendar. For example, it is set out like this: 2019+4750 = Assyrian year 6769.

The Assyrian month names are also used in the Arabic Gregorian solar calendar in the Levant and Mesopotamia (Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine, Syria).

Months

Assyrian calendar[3]
Season Month Transliteration Info Blessed by Days Gregorian calendar
Spring ܢܝܣܢ Nisan Month of Happiness Enlil 31 April
ܐܝܪ Iyar Month of Love Khaya 31 May
ܚܙܝܪܢ Hzirin Month of Building Sin 31 June
Summer ܬܡܘܙ Tammuz Month of Harvesting Tammuz 31 July
ܐܒ/ܛܒܚ Ab / Tibbakh Month of Ripening of Fruits Shamash 31 August
ܐܝܠܘܠ Ilool Month of Sprinkling of Seeds Ishtar 31 September
Autumn ܬܫܪܝܢ ܐ Tishrin I Month of Giving Anu 30 October
ܬܫܪܝܢ ܒ Tishrin II Month of Awakening of Buried Seeds Marduk 30 November
ܟܢܘܢ ܐ Kanoon I (Chisleu) Month of Conceiving Nergal 30 December
Winter ܟܢܘܢ ܒ Kanoon II (Tebet) Month of Resting Nasho 30 January
ܫܒܛ Shebat Month of Flooding Raman 30 February
ܐܕܪ Adaar Month of Evil Spirits Rokhaty 29 March

The intercalary month, added when the new moon following Adaar predates vernal equinox, is called Ve-Adad.

See also

References

  1. ^ Timeline Of Assyria
  2. ^ Assyrian Calendar
  3. ^ "The True Assyrian Calendar - Assyrian Knowledge". Archived from the original on 2010-07-28. Retrieved 2012-11-25.
1201

Year 1201 (MCCI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

1230

Year 1230 (MCCXXX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

1305

Year 1305 (MCCCV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

1419

Year 1419 (MCDXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

1421

Year 1421 (MCDXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

146 BC

Year 146 BCE was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Lentulus and Achaicus (or, less frequently, year 608 Ab urbe condita). The denomination 146 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

1558

Year 1558 (MDLVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

1 BC

Year 1 BC was a common year starting on Friday or Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar (the sources differ, see leap year error for further information) and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Proleptic Julian calendar. It is also a leap year starting on Saturday, in the Proleptic Gregorian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Lentulus and Piso (or, less frequently, year 753 Ab urbe condita). The denomination 1 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. The following year is 1 AD in the widely used Julian calendar, which does not have a "year zero".

2059

2059 (MMLIX)

will be a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2059th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 59th year of the 3rd millennium, the 59th year of the 21st century, and the 10th and last year of the 2050s decade.

27 BC

Year 27 BC was either a common year starting on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday or a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar (the sources differ, see leap year error for further information) and a common year starting on Sunday of the Proleptic Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Second Consulship of Octavian and Agrippa (or, less frequently, year 727 Ab urbe condita). The denomination 27 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

44 BC

Year 44 BC was either a common year starting on Sunday, Common year starting on Monday, leap year starting on Friday, or leap year starting on Saturday. (link will display the full Julian calendar) (the sources differ, see leap year error for further information) and a common year starting on Sunday of the Proleptic Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Julius Caesar V and Marc Antony (or, less frequently, year 710 Ab urbe condita). The denomination 44 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

500 BC

The year 500 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. In the Roman Empire it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Camerinus and Longus (or, less frequently, year 254 Ab urbe condita). The denomination 500 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

666

Year 666 (DCLXVI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 666 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

70 BC

Year 70 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Magnus and Dives (or, less frequently, year 684 Ab urbe condita). The denomination 70 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Babylonian calendar

The Babylonian calendar was a lunisolar calendar with years consisting of 12 lunar months, each beginning when a new crescent moon was first sighted low on the western horizon at sunset, plus an intercalary month inserted as needed by decree. The calendar is based on a Sumerian (Third Dynasty of Ur) predecessor preserved in the Umma calendar of Shulgi (c. 21st century BC).

Nisan

Nisan (or Nissan; Hebrew: נִיסָן‎, Standard Nisan Tiberian Nîsān) on the Assyrian calendar is the first month, and on the Hebrew calendar is the first month of the ecclesiastical year and the seventh month (eighth, in leap year) of the civil year. The name of the month is of Assyrian-Babylonian origin; in the Torah it is called the month of the Aviv. (e.g. Exodus 13:4 בְּחֹ֖דֶשׁ הָאָבִֽיב ḥōḏeš hā-’āḇîḇ) Assyrians today refer to the month as the "month of happiness." It is a spring month of 30 days. Nisan usually falls in March–April on the Gregorian calendar. In the Book of Esther in the Tanakh it is referred to as Nisan. Karaite Jews interpret it as referring to the month in which barley was ripe.

Tammuz (Hebrew month)

Tammuz (Hebrew: תמוז‎: Standard Tammuz, Tiberian Tammûz), or Tamuz, is the tenth month of the civil year and the fourth month of the ecclesiastical year on the Hebrew calendar, and the Assyrian calendar. It is a boreal summer month of 29 days, which occurs on the Gregorian calendar around June–July.

The name of the month was adopted from the Assyrian and Babylonian month Araḫ Dumuzu, named in honour of the Assyro-Babylonian god Tammuz.

Tamuz

For the month of Jewish calendar, see Tammuz (Hebrew month).

For the month of Arabic and Assyrian calendar, see Tammuz (Babylonian calendar).

For a supernatural creature from Assyrian-Babylonian Mesopotamian religion, see Tammuz (mythology).

For the Israeli rock band, see Tamouz (band).

For the Israeli kibbutz, see Tamuz (kibbutz).

For the Spike missile M113 Tamuz, launched from an M113 chassis, see military equipment of Israel

Tamuz Prize, an Israeli award for Singer of the Year

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