Association of American Universities

The Association of American Universities (AAU) is a binational organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. It consists of 60 universities in the United States (both public and private) and two universities in Canada.

Association of American Universities
Association of American Universities Logo
FormationFebruary 28, 1900[1]
Founded atChicago, Illinois, US
Type501(c)(3) nonprofit organization[2]
52-1945674[2]
Headquarters1200 New York Avenue NW, Washington, D.C., U.S.
Location
    • United States
    • Canada
Coordinates38°54′02″N 77°01′43″W / 38.900490°N 77.028556°WCoordinates: 38°54′02″N 77°01′43″W / 38.900490°N 77.028556°W
Membership
62
President
Mary Sue Coleman
Chair
Nicholas Zeppos
Websitewww.aau.edu

Organization

The AAU was founded on February 28, 1900, by a group of 14 Doctor of Philosophy degree–granting universities[a] in the United States to strengthen and standardize American doctoral programs.[1] American universities—starting with the Johns Hopkins University in 1876—were adopting the research-intensive German model of higher education. Lack of standardization damaged European universities' opinions of their American counterparts, however, and many American students attended graduate school in Europe instead of staying in the US. The presidents of the Johns Hopkins University, the University of Chicago, Columbia University, Harvard University, and the University of California had sent a letter of invitation to nine other universities to meet at Chicago in February 1900 to promote and raise standards.[3] Charles E. Elliot of Harvard University was elected the organization's first president,[1] and Stanford University's David Starr Jordan was elected the organization's first chairman.[4]

In 1914, the AAU began accrediting undergraduate education at its members and other schools. German universities used the "AAU Accepted List" to determine whether a college's graduates were qualified for graduate programs. Regional accreditation agencies existed in the U.S. by the 1920s, and the AAU ended accrediting schools in 1948.[5]

The AAU is made up of universities of varying sizes and missions. Today, 62 universities in the US and Canada are members and the primary purpose of the organization is to provide a forum for the development and implementation of institutional and national policies, in order to promote strong programs in academic research and scholarship and undergraduate, graduate, and professional education.

Founding Universities

Benefits

The largest attraction of the AAU for many schools, especially nonmembers, is prestige. For example, in 2010 the chancellor of nonmember North Carolina State University described it as "the pre-eminent research-intensive membership group. To be a part of that organization is something N.C. State aspires to."[6] A spokesman for nonmember University of Connecticut called it "perhaps the most elite organization in higher education. You'd probably be hard-pressed to find a major research university that didn't want to be a member of the AAU."[7] In 2012, the new elected chancellor of University of Massachusetts Amherst, a nonmember of AAU, reaffirmed the framework goal of elevating the campus to AAU standards which inspire them to become a member in the near future, and called it a distinctive status.[8] Because of the lengthy and difficult entrance process, boards of trustees, state legislators, and donors often see membership as evidence of the quality of a university.[6]

The AAU acts as a lobbyist at its headquarters in the city of Washington, DC, for research and higher education funding and for policy and regulatory issues affecting research universities. The association holds two meetings annually, both in Washington. Separate meetings are held for university presidents, provosts, and other officials. Because the meetings are private they offer the opportunity for discussion without media coverage. Prominent government officials, businessmen, and others often speak to the groups.[6]

Presidents

Executive Term
Thomas A. Bartlett 1977–1982
Robert M. Rosenzweig 1983–1993
Cornelius J. Pings 1993–1998
Nils Hasselmo 1998–2006
Robert M. Berdahl 2006–2011
Hunter R. Rawlings III 2011–2016
Mary Sue Coleman 2016–present

Statistics

As of 2004, AAU members accounted for 58 percent[b] of US universities' research grants and contract income and 52 percent of all doctorates awarded in the United States. Since 1999, 43 percent of all Nobel Prize winners and 74 percent of winners at US institutions have been affiliated with an AAU university. Approximately two thirds of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences 2006 Class of Fellows are affiliated with an AAU university. The faculties at AAU universities include 2,993 members of the United States National Academies (82 percent of all members): the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine (2004).[9]

  • Undergraduate students: 1,044,759; 7 percent nationally
  • Undergraduate degrees awarded: 235,328; 17 percent nationally
  • Graduate students: 418,066; 20 percent nationally
  • Master's degrees awarded: 106,971; 19 percent nationally
  • Professional degrees awarded: 20,859; 25 percent nationally
  • Doctorates awarded: 22,747; 52 percent nationally
  • Postdoctoral fellows: 30,430; 67 percent nationally
  • Students studying abroad: 57,205
  • National Merit/Achievement Scholars (2004): 5,434; 63 percent nationally
  • Faculty: approximately 72,000

Membership

AAU membership is by invitation only, which requires an affirmative vote of three fourths of current members. Invitations are considered periodically, based in part on an assessment of the breadth and quality of university programs of research and graduate education, as well as undergraduate education. The association ranks its members using four criteria: research spending, the percentage of faculty who are members of the National Academies, faculty awards, and citations. Two thirds of members can vote to revoke membership for poor rankings.[10][11] As of 2010 annual dues are $80,500.[6] All 60 US members of the AAU are also classified as Highest Research Activity (R1) Universities by the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education.

Institution[12] State or Province Control Established Year joined Total students U.S. News Ranking (2019)[13] Medical school[14][15]
(LCME accredited)
Engineering program[16]
(ABET accredited)
Boston University Massachusetts Private 1839 2012 30,009 42 Green tick Green tick
Brandeis University Massachusetts Private 1948 1985 5,808 35 Red XN Red XN
Brown University Rhode Island Private 1764 1933 8,619 14 Green tick Green tick
California Institute of Technology California Private 1891 1934 2,231 12 Red XN Green tick
Carnegie Mellon University Pennsylvania Private 1900 1982 12,908 25 Red XN Green tick
Case Western Reserve University Ohio Private 1826 1969 11,824 42 Green tick Green tick
Columbia University New York Private 1754 1900 29,250 3 Green tick Green tick
Cornell University New York Private 1865 1900 21,904 16 Green tick Green tick
Duke University North Carolina Private 1838 1938 14,600 8 Green tick Green tick
Emory University Georgia Private 1836 1995 14,513 21 Green tick Red XN[c]
Georgia Institute of Technology Georgia Public 1885 2010 29,370 35 Red XN Green tick
Harvard University Massachusetts Private 1636 1900 21,000 2 Green tick Green tick
Indiana University Bloomington Indiana Public 1820 1909 42,731 89 Red XN Red XN
Iowa State University Iowa Public 1858 1958 36,001 119 Red XN Green tick
Johns Hopkins University Maryland Private 1876 1900 23,073 10 Green tick Green tick
Massachusetts Institute of Technology Massachusetts Private 1861 1934 11,319 3 Red XN Green tick
McGill University Quebec Public 1821 1926 36,904 N/A Green tick Green tick
Michigan State University Michigan Public 1855 1964 49,300 85 Green tick Green tick
New York University New York Private 1831 1950 53,711 30 Green tick Green tick
Northwestern University Illinois Private 1851 1917 21,208 10 Green tick Green tick
Ohio State University Ohio Public 1870 1916 57,466 56 Green tick Green tick
Pennsylvania State University Pennsylvania Public 1855 1958 45,518 59 Green tick Green tick
Princeton University New Jersey Private 1746 1900 8,010 1 Red XN Green tick
Purdue University Indiana Public 1869 1958 39,256 56 Red XN Green tick
Rice University Texas Private 1912 1985 6,487 16 Red XN Green tick
Rutgers University–New Brunswick New Jersey Public 1766 1989 41,565 56 Green tick Green tick
Stanford University California Private 1891 1900 15,877 7 Green tick Green tick
Stony Brook University New York Public 1957 2001 25,272 80 Green tick Green tick
Texas A&M University Texas Public 1876 2001 62,185 66 Green tick Green tick
Tulane University Louisiana Private 1834 1958 13,462 44 Green tick Green tick
The University of Arizona Arizona Public 1885 1985 40,223 106 Green tick Green tick
University at Buffalo New York Public 1846 1989 30,183 89 Green tick Green tick
University of California, Berkeley California Public 1868 1900 36,204 22 Red XN Green tick
University of California, Davis California Public 1905 1996 34,175 38 Green tick Green tick
University of California, Irvine California Public 1965 1996 29,588 33 Green tick Green tick
University of California, Los Angeles California Public 1919 1974 42,163 19 Green tick Green tick
University of California, San Diego California Public 1960 1982 30,310 41 Green tick Green tick
University of California, Santa Barbara California Public 1944 1995 25,057 30 Red XN Green tick
The University of Chicago Illinois Private 1890 1900 14,954 3 Green tick Green tick
University of Colorado Boulder Colorado Public 1876 1966 32,775 96 Red XN Green tick
University of Florida Florida Public 1853 1985 49,042 35 Green tick Green tick
University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign Illinois Public 1867 1908 44,520 46 Green tick Green tick
The University of Iowa Iowa Public 1847 1909 31,065 89 Green tick Green tick
The University of Kansas Kansas Public 1865 1909 27,983 129 Green tick Green tick
University of Maryland, College Park Maryland Public 1856 1969 37,631 63 Green tick Green tick
University of Michigan Michigan Public 1817 1900 43,426 27 Green tick Green tick
University of Minnesota Minnesota Public 1851 1908 51,853 76 Green tick Green tick
University of Missouri Missouri Public 1839 1908 35,441 129 Green tick Green tick
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill North Carolina Public 1789 1922 29,390 30 Green tick Green tick[d]
University of Oregon Oregon Public 1876 1969 22,980 102 Red XN Red XN
University of Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Private 1740 1900 24,630 8 Green tick Green tick
University of Pittsburgh Pennsylvania Public 1787 1974 28,649 70 Green tick Green tick
University of Rochester New York Private 1850 1941 10,290 33 Green tick Green tick
University of Southern California California Private 1880 1969 39,958 22 Green tick Green tick
University of Texas at Austin Texas Public 1883 1929 51,000 49 Green tick Green tick
University of Toronto Ontario Public 1827 1926 84,000 N/A Green tick Green tick
University of Virginia Virginia Public 1819 1904 24,360 25 Green tick Green tick
University of Washington Washington Public 1861 1950 43,762 59 Green tick Green tick
University of Wisconsin–Madison Wisconsin Public 1848 1900 43,275 49 Green tick Green tick
Vanderbilt University Tennessee Private 1873 1950 12,795 14 Green tick Green tick
Washington University in St. Louis Missouri Private 1853 1923 14,117 19 Green tick Green tick
Yale University Connecticut Private 1701 1900 12,223 3 Green tick Green tick

Former members

Departed as a result of "institutional emphases and energies" that differed from the other AAU members.[19]
Departed because of a shift in the AAU's emphasis to large research universities.[20]
Removed from the AAU.[11] Chancellor Harvey Perlman claimed that the lack of an on-campus medical school (the Medical Center is a separate campus of the University of Nebraska system) and the AAU's disregarding of USDA-funded agricultural research in its metrics hurt the university's performance in the association's internal ranking system.[10]
Because of a dispute over how to count nonfederal grants, Syracuse voluntarily withdrew from the AAU in 2011. The Chronicle of Higher Education reported that after "it became clear that Syracuse wouldn't meet the association's revised membership criteria, university officials decided that they would leave the organization voluntarily, rather than face a vote like Nebraska's, and notified the leadership of their intentions."[21]

Map of schools

Association of American Universities is located in the United States
Rice
Rice
Tulane
Tulane
Buffalo
Buffalo
Arizona
Arizona
UC Berkeley
UC Berkeley
UCLA
UCLA
Oregon
Oregon
USC
USC
Stanford
Stanford
Washington
Washington
Colorado
Colorado
TAMU
TAMU
Florida
Florida
Vanderbilt
Vanderbilt
Missouri
Missouri
Penn State
Penn State
Rutgers
Rutgers
Indiana
Indiana
Michigan
Michigan
Michigan State
Michigan State
Ohio State
Ohio State
Illinois
Illinois
Iowa
Iowa
Minnesota
Minnesota
Northwestern
Northwestern
Purdue
Purdue
Wisconsin
Wisconsin
Maryland
Maryland
Iowa State
Iowa State
Kansas
Kansas
Texas
Texas
Ga. Tech
Ga. Tech
Virginia
Virginia
UNC
UNC
Duke
Duke
Pitt
Pitt
Brown
Brown
Columbia
Columbia
Cornell
Cornell
UPenn
UPenn
Princeton
Princeton
Yale
Yale
Caltech
Caltech
UC Davis
UC Davis
UC Irvine
UC Irvine
UC San Diego
UC San Diego
UC Santa Barbara
UC Santa Barbara
Emory
Emory
UChicago
UChicago
Johns Hopkins
Johns Hopkins
Four schools*
Four schools*
Wash U.
Wash U.
NYU
NYU
Stony Brook
Stony Brook
Rochester
Rochester
Case Western
Case Western
Carnegie Mellon
Carnegie Mellon
Toronto
Toronto
McGill
McGill
A map of the AAU schools, with private schools marked blue and public schools marked red. Four private schools in Greater Boston are not labeled separately due to space reasons: Harvard, MIT, Boston University, and Brandeis.

Advocacy

In 2014, the AAU supported the proposed Research and Development Efficiency Act arguing that the legislation "can lead to a long-needed reduction in the regulatory burden currently imposed on universities and their faculty members who conduct research on behalf of the federal government."[22] According to the AAU, "too often federal requirements" for accounting for federal grant money "are ill-conceived, ineffective, and/or duplicative."[22] This wastes the researchers' times and "reduces the time they can devote to discovery and innovation and increases institutional compliance costs."[22] AAU institutions are frequently involved in US science policy debates. In 2008, AAU Vice President for Policy, Tobin Smith, co-authored a textbook on US science policy.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The Association of American Universities was founded by University of California, Catholic University of America. University of Chicago, Clark University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University, University of Michigan, Princeton University, University of Pennsylvania, Stanford University, University of Wisconsin, and Yale University, all of which were its first members.[1]
  2. ^ Over $15.9 billion: NIH: $9.1 billion, 60 percent of total academic research funding. Research Funding: National Science Foundation: $2.0 billion, 63 percent of total academic research funding Department of Defense: $1.2 billion, 56 percent of total academic research funding Department of Energy: $505.2 million, 63 percent of total academic research funding NASA: $673.2 million, 57 percent of total academic research funding Department of Agriculture: $271.9 million, 41 percent of total academic research funding.
  3. ^ Although Emory shares a joint engineering department with Georgia Tech, the program is accredited through Georgia Tech.[17]
  4. ^ UNC shares a joint engineering department with NCSU.[18]

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Colleges WIll Co-operate: Organization of the Association of American Universities". The Washington Post. March 1, 1900. p. 2.
  2. ^ a b "Association Of American Colleges And Universities". Tax Exempt Organization Search. Internal Revenue Service. December 20, 2018.
  3. ^ "The Letter of Invitation to the Founding Conference of AAU". Association of American Universities. January 1900.
  4. ^ "For Uniform Requirements: Universities Will Fix Standard For Higher Degrees". The Baltimore Sun';. March 1, 1900. p. 2.
  5. ^ "The Association of American Universities: A Century of Service to Higher Education 1900-2000". Association of American Universities. Retrieved February 25, 2018.
  6. ^ a b c d Fain, Paul (April 21, 2010). "As AAU Admits Georgia Tech to Its Exclusive Club, Other Universities Await the Call". Chronicle of Higher Education. Archived from the original on June 11, 2011. Retrieved April 29, 2011.
  7. ^ Hine, Chris (June 13, 2010). "Nebraska has it all to attract Big Ten, most importantly AAU membership". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on September 6, 2011. Retrieved April 29, 2011.
  8. ^ UMass Amherst: Kumble R. Subbaswamy – Feature Story Archived July 11, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. Umass.edu (May 13, 2012). Retrieved on 2013-07-15.
  9. ^ AAU Facts and Figures Archived September 12, 2008, at the Wayback Machine. Accessed August 24, 2008.
  10. ^ a b Abourezk, Kevin (April 29, 2011). "Research universities group ends UNL's membership". Lincoln Journal Star. Archived from the original on May 3, 2011. Retrieved April 29, 2011.
  11. ^ a b Selingo, Jeffrey J. (April 29, 2011). "U. of Nebraska-Lincoln Is Voted Out of Assn. of American Universities". Chronicle of Higher Education. Archived from the original on May 2, 2011. Retrieved April 29, 2011.
  12. ^ "Member Institutions and Years of Admission". Association of American Universities. Archived from the original on October 26, 2014. Retrieved October 25, 2014.
  13. ^ "2019 U.S. News National Universities Rankings".
  14. ^ "Accredited MD Programs in the United States". LCME. Liaison Committee on Medical Education. Retrieved May 18, 2018.
  15. ^ "AAU Peer Institutions". Data Analytics. August 10, 2016. Retrieved May 14, 2018.
  16. ^ "ABET ACCREDITED PROGRAM SEARCH". ABET. ABET. Retrieved May 17, 2018.
  17. ^ "Accreditation and Assessment". Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology & Emory University School of Medicine. Retrieved May 17, 2018.
  18. ^ "Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering". Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering. Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering @ UNC & NC State. Retrieved May 17, 2018.
  19. ^ O'Connell, The Most Rev. David M. (2002). "From the President's Desk". The Catholic University of America. Archived from the original on June 1, 2013. Retrieved August 25, 2013.
  20. ^ Peter Schmidt, "Clark U. Leaves Association of American Universities; Others May Follow" (September 10, 1999). Chronicle of Higher Education.
  21. ^ Selingo, Jeffrey J. (May 2, 2011). "Facing an Ouster From an Elite Group of Universities, Syracuse U. Says It Will Withdraw". Chronicle of Higher Education. Archived from the original on May 4, 2011. Retrieved May 3, 2011.
  22. ^ a b c "AAU Statement on the Research and Development Efficiency Act". Association of American Universities. July 14, 2014. Archived from the original on July 25, 2014. Retrieved July 17, 2014.

External links

Center for Measuring University Performance

The Center for Measuring University Performance is a research center at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. The Center is best known for an annual report it produces, The Top American Research Universities, that ranks American universities on nine different measures: Total Research, Federal Research, Endowment Assets, Annual Giving, National Academy Members, Faculty Awards, Doctorates Granted, Postdoctoral Appointees, and SAT/ACT range. The center also produces other scholarly works on ranking and education quality. The raw data used by the researchers at The Center is made available to the public on the web. This ranking's influence within the academic community has been described as being "commonly regarded to be one of three indicators that reflect an institution's rank as a Tier One institution", the other two being the classification of a university with "very high research activity" by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and membership within the Association of American Universities.Elizabeth Capaldi, former executive vice president and provost of Arizona State University, co-directed The Center for Measuring University Performance with John Lombardi, former president of the Louisiana State University system.

David Ward (university president)

David Ward (born July 8, 1938, in Manchester, England) was the president of the American Council on Education from September 2001 to September 2008. In 2011 he was appointed Interim Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where he served a prior term as Chancellor from 1993 to 2001, Provost and Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs from 1989 to 2003, and Associate Dean of the Graduate School from 1980 to 1987.A leading scholar in urban geography, Ward received his B.A.(1959) and M.A.(1961) from the University of Leeds before moving to the University of Wisconsin–Madison on a Fulbright Travel Award, and earning his doctorate there in 1963. After teaching at Carleton University and the University of British Columbia, Ward returned to UW–Madison in 1966.Ward was born and raised in Manchester. He is married with two sons and six grandchildren. When he is not in Madison, he resides in Washington, DC.As chancellor, Ward oversaw a major overhaul of UW–Madison's information technology infrastructure, as well as the development of a cluster-hiring program called "The Madison Initiative Investment Plan". Ward's chancellorship also saw the creation of new undergraduate residential learning communities on campus and the construction and opening of the Kohl Center.

Ward has served as Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the University Corporation for Advanced Internet Development, Chairman of the Government Relations Council of the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges, and served on the Committee on Undergraduate Education of the Association of American Universities, the Science Coalition, and the Kellogg Commission on the Future of State and Land-Grant Universities.

In 2011, following Carolyn "Biddy" Martin's resignation to become president of Amherst College, Ward was appointed interim chancellor of UW-Madison to serve until a permanent replacement could be found.

Gary Tobian

Gary Milburn Tobian (born August 14, 1935) is a retired American diver. He competed in the 1956 and 1960 Summer Olympics and won a gold or silver medal in all his events: a gold in the 3 m springboard in 1960 and two silvers in the 10 m platform. Tobian held six Association of American Universities (AAU) titles in the platform, and won the springboard at the 1958 AAU Championships and at the 1959 Pan American Games. In 1978 he was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame.Tobian was a successful businessman. He was married to the Olympic swimmer Marley Shriver, but they later divorced.

Harvard University

Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with about 6,700 undergraduate students and about 15,250 postgraduate students. Established in 1636 and named for its first benefactor, clergyman John Harvard, Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning. Its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities. The university is often cited as the world's top tertiary institution by most publishers.The Harvard Corporation, chartered in 1650, is the governing body of Harvard. The early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy, although it has never been formally affiliated with any denomination. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites. Following the American Civil War, President Charles W. Eliot's long tenure (1869–1909) transformed the college and affiliated professional schools into a modern research university; Harvard was a founding member of the Association of American Universities in 1900.A. Lawrence Lowell, who followed Eliot, further reformed the undergraduate curriculum and undertook aggressive expansion of Harvard's land holdings and physical plant. James Bryant Conant led the university through the Great Depression and World War II and began to reform the curriculum and liberalize admissions after the war. The undergraduate college became coeducational after its 1977 merger with Radcliffe College.

The university is organized into eleven separate academic units—ten faculties and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study—with campuses throughout the Boston metropolitan area: its 209-acre (85 ha) main campus is centered on Harvard Yard in Cambridge, approximately 3 miles (5 km) northwest of Boston; the business school and athletics facilities, including Harvard Stadium, are located across the Charles River in the Allston neighborhood of Boston; and the medical, dental, and public health schools are in the Longwood Medical Area. Harvard's endowment is worth $39.2 billion, making it the largest of any academic institution.

Harvard is a large, highly residential research university. The nominal cost of attendance is high, but the university's large endowment allows it to offer generous financial aid packages. The Harvard Library is the world's largest academic and private library system, comprising 79 individual libraries holding over 18 million items.Harvard's alumni include eight U.S. presidents, more than thirty foreign heads of state, 62 living billionaires, 359 Rhodes Scholars, and 242 Marshall Scholars. As of October 2018, 158 Nobel laureates, 18 Fields Medalists, and 14 Turing Award winners have been affiliated as students, faculty, or researchers. In addition, Harvard students and alumni have won 10 Academy Awards, 48 Pulitzer Prizes and 108 Olympic medals (46 gold, 41 silver and 21 bronze), and have founded a large number of companies worldwide.

History of the University of Florida

The history of the University of Florida is firmly tied to the history of public education in the state of Florida. The University of Florida originated as several distinct institutions that were consolidated to create a single state-supported university by the Buckman Act of 1905. The earliest of these was the East Florida Seminary, one of two seminaries of higher learning established by the Florida Legislature. The East Florida Seminary opened in 1853, becoming the first state-supported institution of higher learning in the state of Florida; the University of Florida traces its founding date to that year.

The East Florida Seminary operated in Ocala until the outbreak of the American Civil War in 1861. It closed for the duration of the war, and reopened in Gainesville in 1866, absorbing the Gainesville Academy. The other primary predecessor to the University of Florida was the Florida Agricultural College, established at Lake City in 1884 by Jordan Probst. Florida Agricultural College became the first land-grant college in the state, and the small college emphasized the scientific training of agricultural and mechanical specialists. In 1903, the Florida Legislature changed the name of Florida Agricultural College to the "University of Florida", in recognition of the legislature's desire to expand the curriculum beyond the college's original agricultural and engineering educational missions.

In 1905 the Buckman Act restructured higher education in Florida, and the state's six standing institutions were reorganized into three schools segregated by race and gender. The act mandated the merger of four of these institutions – the East Florida Seminary, the University of Florida at Lake City (formerly Florida Agricultural College), the St. Petersburg Normal and Industrial School in St. Petersburg, and the South Florida Military College in Bartow – into the University of the State of Florida, a university for white males. The school began accepting some white women starting in 1924, and became fully coeducational as a result of the influx of new students brought in by the GI Bill after World War II. It became racially integrated in 1958. Into the 21st century the school grew substantially in size and increased in academic prominence, becoming a member of the Association of American Universities in 1985. It is now known as The University of Florida.

Hunter R. Rawlings III

Hunter Ripley Rawlings III (born December 14, 1944) is an American classics scholar and academic administrator. He is best known for serving as the 17th President of the University of Iowa from 1987 until 1995 and as the 10th President of Cornell University from 1995 until 2003. He also served as Cornell's interim president in 2005–2006 and again from 2016–2017. Currently, Rawlings is Professor and University President Emeritus at the Department of Classics.

Rawlings served as President of the Association of American Universities from June 1, 2011, until April 2016. He has served as chair of both the Association of American Universities and the Ivy Council of Presidents. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and he serves on the boards of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, Haverford College, and the National Academy Foundation.

John R. Hubbard

John Randolph "Jack" Hubbard (December 3, 1918 – August 21, 2011) was the eighth president of the University of Southern California (USC) between 1970 and 1980. He succeeded Norman Topping and was succeeded by James Zumberge. He had served as USC vice president and provost in 1969 after spending four years in India as chief education adviser to the U.S. Agency for International Development. After USC, he served as the United States Ambassador to India from 1988 to 1989. Hubbard was a Republican, But he supported John Kerry in 2004 for President In 1970, USC became a member of the Association of American Universities. Between 1970 and 1980, USC rose from 33 to 19 in National Science Foundation federal research rankings and applications rose from 4,100 to more than 11,000. Hubbard's Toward Century II campaign, started in 1976, raised more than $306 million.

Hubbard continued to teach history during his term as president and afterward, until shortly before his death. Hubbard served on the USC Board of Trustees. USC's Student Services building was renamed John Hubbard Hall in September 2003. Late in life, he taught two undergraduate seminars at USC, entitled "British Empire From the Mid-19th Century" and "The Era of the First World War". During His time as President of USC, he was criticized due to the amount of foreign oil donations from the middle east he received. Prior to USC, he was dean and professor at Tulane University, New Orleans; visiting professor at Yale University, and assistant professor at Louisiana State University (at Baton Rouge).

Hubbard earned his B.A., M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in history from the University of Texas - Austin and honorary degrees from Hebrew Union College, Westminster College, College of the Ozarks and USC Law School. Hubbard was a pilot in the United States Navy during World War II, winning four Air Medals. While an undergraduate at the University of Texas, he became a brother of the Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity.

Mary Sue Coleman

Mary Sue Coleman (born October 2, 1943) is the current President of the Association of American Universities (AAU). She also was the 13th President of the University of Michigan. In 2009, she was named one of the nation's "10 best college presidents" by Time.She also formerly served as Professor of Biological Chemistry in the University of Michigan Medical School and Professor of Chemistry in the College of Literature, Science and the Arts.

Nils Hasselmo

Nils Hasselmo (July 2, 1931 – January 23, 2019) was the thirteenth president of the University of Minnesota, serving from 1988 to 1997. He went on to become the president of the Association of American Universities from 1998 to 2006.

Rutgers University

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (), commonly referred to as Rutgers University, Rutgers, or RU, is a public research university in New Jersey. It is the largest institution of higher education in New Jersey.

Rutgers was originally chartered as Queen's College on November 10, 1766. It is the eighth-oldest college in the United States and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution. The college was renamed Rutgers College in 1825 in honor of Colonel Henry Rutgers. For most of its existence, Rutgers was a private liberal arts college but it evolved into a coeducational public research university after being designated "The State University of New Jersey" by the New Jersey Legislature in laws enacted in 1945 and 1956.Rutgers has three campuses located throughout New Jersey: New Brunswick campus in New Brunswick and adjacent Piscataway, the Newark campus, and the Camden campus. The university has additional facilities elsewhere in the state. Instruction is offered by 9,000 faculty members in 175 academic departments to over 45,000 undergraduate students and more than 20,000 graduate and professional students. The university is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools and is a member of the Big Ten Academic Alliance, the Association of American Universities and the Universities Research Association. The New Brunswick campus was categorized by Howard and Matthew Green in their book titled The Public Ivies: America's Flagship Public Universities (2001) as a Public Ivy.

Thomas A. Bartlett

Thomas Alva Bartlett (born August 20, 1930) is an American educator who is most notable for having served as President of several universities and university systems.

Bartlett was born in Salem, Oregon, and was youngest of three sons of Cleave Bartlett, an auditor-bookkeeper and real estate broker, and the former Alma Hanson, a housewife. In 1947, he graduated from Salem High School. He attended Willamette University for two years, where he joined Beta Theta Pi fraternity, before transferring to Stanford University, where he was elected to the Phi Beta Kappa Society. After graduating in 1951 with a bachelor's degree in Political Science, he attended Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar, earning a master's degree. In 1959 he was awarded a Ph.D. degree from Stanford University. While still in graduate school, he was recruited to join the United States Permanent Mission to the United Nations to work on Arab-Israeli relations. From, there, he became the President of the American University in Cairo.

From 1969 to 1977, he assumed the Presidency of Colgate University as well as the Chancellorships of the University of Alabama System and the Oregon State System of Higher Education from the 1970s to the 1980s. He also served as President of the Association of American Universities. He was called out of a brief retirement to head the State University of New York System in 1994, but conflicts with George Pataki appointees on the university's board of trustees led to his resignation after just 17 months on the job.After SUNY, he became chairman of the board of trustees of the United States-Japan Foundation, leaving after seven years to re-assume the Presidency of the American University in Cairo on an interim basis.

The Thomas A. Bartlett Chair of English at Colgate University is named after him.

Tulane University

Tulane University is a private research university in New Orleans, Louisiana. It was founded as a public medical college in 1834 and became a comprehensive university in 1847. The institution was made private under the endowments of Paul Tulane and Josephine Louise Newcomb in 1884. Tulane is the 9th oldest private university in the Association of American Universities, which consists of major research universities in the United States and Canada. The Tulane University Law School and Tulane University Medical School are considered the 12th oldest and 15th oldest law and medical schools, respectively, in the United States.Alumni include prominent entrepreneurs, founders, and inventors in technology, medical devices, entertainment, retail, mass media, fashion, and public policy; the President of Costa Rica; U.S. State governors; Federal judges (including a Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court); U.S. Senators; U.S. Members of Congress (including a Speaker of the House); heads of Federal agencies; two Surgeons General of the United States; U.S. diplomats; at least 23 undergraduate Marshall scholars (which ranks Tulane 18th among all universities and colleges); at least 18 Rhodes scholars; at least 12 Truman scholars; 155 Fulbright scholars; prominent screenwriters; Emmy-award winners; Oscar-Award winners; Pulitzer-prize-winning authors; chief executive officers; major law firm partners; university presidents; living billionaires including Ricardo Salinas Pliego; Stanley Motta; David Filo; and Jerry Springer. At least two Nobel laureates have been affiliated with the university.

U15 (German universities)

German U15 e.V. is an association of fifteen major research-intensive and leading medical universities in Germany with a full disciplinary spectrum, excluding any defining engineering sciences.

The governing body is the Albert Ludwig University of Freiburg, represented by Rector Hans-Jochen Schiewer; the deputy governing body is the University of Mainz, represented by President Georg Krausch. The managing director is Jan Wöpking.

The association's headquarters are in Berlin.

U15 has been a member of the Global Network of Research Universities since November 2014. The network includes the Russell Group (Great Britain, headquartered in London), Association of American Universities (United States of America, headquartered in Washington D.C.), League of European Research Universities (Europe, headquartered in Leuven/Belgium), Association of East Asian Research Universities (Chinese mainland, Japan, South Korea, Hong Kong und Taiwan), C9 League (China), Group of Eight (Australia, headquartered in Canberra), Research Universities 11 (Japan) und the U15 Group of Canadian Research Universities (Canada, headquartered in Ottawa).

University of Iowa

The University of Iowa (UI, U of I, UIowa, or simply Iowa) is a public research university in Iowa City, Iowa. Founded in 1847, it is the oldest and the second largest university in the state. The University of Iowa is organized into 11 colleges offering more than 200 areas of study and seven professional degrees.Located on an urban 1,880 acre campus on the banks of the Iowa River, the University of Iowa is classified among "R1: Doctoral Universities – Very high research activity." The university is best known for its programs in health care, law, and the fine arts, with programs ranking among the top 25 nationally in those areas. The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and the Stead Family Children's Hospital are ranked nationally by U.S. News and World Report in eleven specialties. The university was the original developer of the Master of Fine Arts degree and it operates the Iowa Writer's Workshop, which has produced 17 of the university's 46 Pulitzer Prize winners. Iowa is a member of the Association of American Universities, the Universities Research Association, and the Big Ten Academic Alliance.

Among American universities, the University of Iowa was the first public university to open as coeducational, opened the first coeducational medical school, and opened the first Department of Religious Studies at a public university. The University of Iowa's 33,000 students take part in nearly 500 student organizations. Iowa's 22 varsity athletic teams, the Iowa Hawkeyes, compete in Division I of the NCAA and are members of the Big Ten Conference. The University of Iowa alumni network exceeds 250,000 graduates.

University of Kansas

The University of Kansas, also referred to as KU, is a public research university with its main campus in Lawrence, Kansas, and several satellite campuses, research and educational centers, medical centers, and classes across the state of Kansas. Two branch campuses are in the Kansas City metropolitan area on the Kansas side: the university's medical school and hospital in Kansas City, the Edwards Campus in Overland Park, and a hospital and research center in the state's capital of Topeka. There are also educational and research sites in Garden City, Hays, Leavenworth, Parsons, and Topeka, and branches of the medical school in Salina and Wichita. The university is one of the 62 members of the Association of American Universities.

Founded March 21, 1865, the university was opened in 1866, under a charter granted by the Kansas State Legislature in 1864 following enabling legislation passed in 1863 under the State Constitution, adopted two years after the 1861 admission of the former Kansas Territory as the 34th state into the Union following an internal civil war known as "Bleeding Kansas" during the 1850s.Enrollment at the Lawrence and Edwards campuses was 28,401 students in 2016; an additional 3,383 students were enrolled at the KU Medical Center for an enrollment of 28,091 students across the three campuses. The university overall employed 2,814 faculty members in fall 2015.

University of Oregon

The University of Oregon (also referred to as UO, U of O or Oregon) is a public flagship research university in Eugene, Oregon. Founded in 1876, the institution's 295-acre campus is along the Willamette River. Since July 2014, UO has been governed by the Board of Trustees of the University of Oregon. The university has a Carnegie Classification of "highest research activity" and has 19 research centers and institutes. UO was admitted to the Association of American Universities in 1969.The University of Oregon is organized into five colleges (Arts and Sciences, Business, Design, Education, and Honors) and seven professional schools (Accounting, Architecture and Environment, Art and Design, Journalism and Communication, Law, Music and Dance, and Planning, Public Policy and Management) and a graduate school. Furthermore, UO offers 316 undergraduate and graduate degree programs. Most academic programs follow the 10 week Quarter System.UO student-athletes compete as the Ducks and are part of the Pac-12 Conference in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). With eighteen varsity teams, the Oregon Ducks are best known for their football team and track and field program.

University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences

The University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) is the largest academic unit of the University of Oregon (UO) in Eugene, Oregon, United States. The main offices of the college are located in Friendly Hall on the UO campus. Through its 45 departments and programs—spanning the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences—CAS offers the core liberal arts curriculum that serves the entire undergraduate population of the UO.

CAS typically has approximately 11,000 undergraduates majoring in its 47 major fields of study at any given time. At the graduate level, CAS offers 30 graduate degree programs and grants approximately three-quarters of UO's doctoral degrees.

CAS is also the research hub of the UO, with nearly 500 tenure-track faculty, or 60% of the UO total. CAS research faculty generate more than half the sponsored research at UO and the academic accomplishments of CAS faculty provide the basis for the UO's membership in the Association of American Universities.

University of Virginia

The University of Virginia (U.Va. or UVA) is a public research university in Charlottesville, Virginia. It was founded in 1819 by Declaration of Independence author Thomas Jefferson. It is known for its historic foundations, student-run honor code, and secret societies. UVA is the flagship university of Virginia and home to Jefferson's Academical Village, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.The original governing Board of Visitors included Jefferson, James Madison, and James Monroe. Monroe was the sitting President of the United States at the time of its foundation and earlier Presidents Jefferson and Madison were UVA's first two rectors. Jefferson conceived and designed the original courses of study and original architecture. UVA was the first university of the American South elected to the research-driven Association of American Universities in 1904 and remains the sole AAU research university in Virginia. The journal Science credited UVA faculty with two of the top ten scientific breakthroughs of 2015.The University of Virginia offers 121 majors across the eight undergraduate and three professional schools. Its alumni have founded a large number of companies, such as Reddit, which together produce more than $1.6 trillion in annual revenue and have created 2.3 million jobs. The historic 1,682-acre (2.6 sq mi; 680.7 ha) campus has been ranked as one of the most beautiful collegiate grounds in the country. The university additionally maintains 562 acres north of the campus at UVA Research Park, and 2,913 acres southeast of the city at Morven Farm. Moreover it manages the College at Wise in Southwest Virginia and until 1972 managed George Mason University and the University of Mary Washington in Northern Virginia.

Virginia student athletes are called Cavaliers and top the Atlantic Coast Conference in men's team NCAA Championships with 19, ranking second in overall and women's NCAA titles. Virginia men's basketball won the NCAA Tournament Championship in 2019 to join several Cavalier teams in winning recent high-profile NCAA Championship events including the College World Series, College Cup, and NCAA Tennis Championships. The entire men's program was awarded the Capital One Cup in 2015 for leading the nation in overall athletics excellence.

William Powers Jr.

William Charles Powers Jr. (May 30, 1946 – March 10, 2019) was an American attorney, academic, and university administrator who served as the 28th president of the University of Texas at Austin, becoming the second-longest serving president in the university's history. He held the position from February 1, 2006, to July 2, 2015, when he was succeeded by Gregory L. Fenves. Before his death, Powers held the Hines H. Baker and Thelma Kelley Baker Chair at the University of Texas School of Law.Powers was selected in November 2005 as the sole finalist for the position of president of the University of Texas at Austin. In December 2005, he was officially named president of the university and succeeded Larry Faulkner when he left office in February 2006. Prior to his appointment, he had served as dean of the University of Texas School of Law since 2000. Powers resigned the presidency in June 2015, partly as the result of external pressures regarding admissions practices at the university.

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