Associated Press Athlete of the Year

The first Athlete of the Year award in the United States was initiated by the Associated Press (AP) in 1931. At a time when women in sports were not given the same recognition as men, the AP offered a male and a female athlete of the year award to either a professional or amateur athlete. The awards are voted on annually by a panel of AP sports editors from across the United States. A large majority of the winners have been Americans. However, non-Americans are also eligible for the honor, and have won on a few occasions.

List of award winners

Year Male Female
Name Sport Name Sport
1931 United States Pepper Martin Major League Baseball United States Helene Madison Swimming
1932 United States Gene Sarazen PGA golf United States Babe Didrikson Track and field
1933 United States Carl Hubbell Major League Baseball United States Helen Jacobs Tennis
1934 United States Dizzy Dean Major League Baseball United States Virginia Van Wie Golf
1935 United States Joe Louis Boxing United States Helen Wills Moody Tennis
1936 United States Jesse Owens Track and field United States Helen Stephens Track and field
1937 United States Don Budge Tennis United States Katherine Rawls Swimming
1938 United States Don Budge Tennis United States Patty Berg Golf
1939 United States Nile Kinnick College football United States Alice Marble Tennis
1940 United States Tom Harmon College football United States Alice Marble Tennis
1941 United States Joe DiMaggio Major League Baseball United States Betty Hicks Newell Golf
1942 United States Frank Sinkwich College football United States Gloria Callen Swimming
1943 Sweden Gunder Hägg Track and field United States Patty Berg Golf
1944 United States Byron Nelson PGA golf United States Ann Curtis Swimming
1945 United States Byron Nelson PGA golf United States Babe Didrikson Zaharias Golf
1946 United States Glenn Davis College football United States Babe Didrikson Zaharias Golf
1947 United States Johnny Lujack College football United States Babe Didrikson Zaharias Golf
1948 United States Lou Boudreau Major League Baseball Netherlands Fanny Blankers-Koen Track and field
1949 United States Leon Hart College football United States Marlene Bauer Golf
1950 United States Jim Konstanty Major League Baseball United States Babe Didrikson Zaharias LPGA golf[1]
1951 United States Dick Kazmaier College football United States Maureen Connolly Tennis
1952 United States Bob Mathias Track and field United States Maureen Connolly Tennis
1953 United States Ben Hogan PGA golf United States Maureen Connolly Tennis
1954 United States Willie Mays Major League Baseball United States Babe Didrikson Zaharias LPGA golf
1955 United States Howard "Hopalong" Cassady College football United States Patty Berg LPGA golf
1956 United States Mickey Mantle Major League Baseball United States Pat McCormick Diving
1957 United States Ted Williams Major League Baseball United States Althea Gibson Tennis
1958 Australia Herb Elliott Track and field United States Althea Gibson Tennis
1959 Sweden Ingemar Johansson Boxing Brazil Maria Bueno Tennis
1960 United States Rafer Johnson Track and field United States Wilma Rudolph Track and field
1961 United States Roger Maris Major League Baseball United States Wilma Rudolph Track and field
1962 United States Maury Wills Major League Baseball Australia Dawn Fraser Swimming
1963 United States Sandy Koufax Major League Baseball United States Mickey Wright LPGA golf
1964 United States Don Schollander Swimming United States Mickey Wright LPGA golf
1965 United States Sandy Koufax Major League Baseball United States Kathy Whitworth LPGA golf
1966 United States Frank Robinson Major League Baseball United States Kathy Whitworth LPGA golf
1967 United States Carl Yastrzemski Major League Baseball United States Billie Jean King Tennis
1968 United States Denny McLain Major League Baseball United States Peggy Fleming Figure skating
1969 United States Tom Seaver Major League Baseball United States Debbie Meyer Swimming
1970 United States George Blanda National Football League Taiwan Chi Cheng Track and field
1971 United States Lee Trevino PGA golf Australia Evonne Goolagong Tennis
1972 United States Mark Spitz Swimming Soviet Union Olga Korbut Gymnastics
1973 United States O.J. Simpson National Football League United States Billie Jean King Tennis
1974 United States Muhammad Ali Boxing United States Chris Evert Tennis
1975 United States Fred Lynn Major League Baseball United States Chris Evert Tennis
1976 United States Bruce Jenner Track and field Romania Nadia Comăneci Gymnastics
1977 United States Steve Cauthen Horse racing United States Chris Evert Tennis
1978 United States Ron Guidry Major League Baseball United States Nancy Lopez LPGA golf
1979 United States Willie Stargell Major League Baseball United States Tracy Austin Tennis
1980 United States U.S. Olympic hockey team Ice hockey United States Chris Evert Lloyd Tennis
1981 United States John McEnroe Tennis United States Tracy Austin Tennis
1982 Canada Wayne Gretzky National Hockey League United States Mary Tabb Track and field
1983 United States Carl Lewis Track and field United States Martina Navratilova Tennis
1984 United States Carl Lewis Track and field United States Mary Lou Retton Gymnastics
1985 United States Dwight Gooden Major League Baseball United States Nancy Lopez LPGA golf
1986 United States Larry Bird National Basketball Association United States Martina Navratilova Tennis
1987 Canada Ben Johnson Track and field United States Jackie Joyner-Kersee Track and field
1988 United States Orel Hershiser Major League Baseball United States Florence Griffith Joyner Track and field
1989 United States Joe Montana National Football League West Germany Steffi Graf Tennis
1990 United States Joe Montana National Football League United States Beth Daniel LPGA golf
1991 United States Michael Jordan National Basketball Association Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Monica Seles[2] Tennis
1992 United States Michael Jordan National Basketball Association Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Monica Seles Tennis
1993 United States Michael Jordan National Basketball Association United States Sheryl Swoopes College basketball
1994 United States George Foreman Boxing United States Bonnie Blair Speed skating
1995 United States Cal Ripken, Jr. Major League Baseball United States Rebecca Lobo College basketball
1996 United States Michael Johnson Track and field United States Amy Van Dyken Swimming
1997 United States Tiger Woods PGA Tour golf Switzerland Martina Hingis Tennis
1998 United States Mark McGwire Major League Baseball South Korea Se Ri Pak LPGA golf
1999 United States Tiger Woods PGA Tour golf United States U.S. women's soccer team Soccer
2000 United States Tiger Woods PGA Tour golf United States Marion Jones Track and field
2001 United States Barry Bonds Major League Baseball United States Jennifer Capriati Tennis
2002 United States Lance Armstrong Cycling United States Serena Williams Tennis
2003 United States Lance Armstrong Cycling Sweden Annika Sörenstam LPGA golf
2004 United States Lance Armstrong Cycling Sweden Annika Sörenstam LPGA golf
2005 United States Lance Armstrong Cycling Sweden Annika Sörenstam LPGA golf
2006 United States Tiger Woods PGA Tour golf Mexico Lorena Ochoa LPGA golf
2007 United States Tom Brady National Football League Mexico Lorena Ochoa LPGA golf
2008 United States Michael Phelps Swimming United States Candace Parker Women's National Basketball Association
2009 United States Jimmie Johnson[3] NASCAR United States Serena Williams Tennis
2010 United States Drew Brees National Football League United States Lindsey Vonn Skiing
2011 United States Aaron Rodgers National Football League United States Abby Wambach Soccer
2012 United States Michael Phelps Swimming United States Gabby Douglas Gymnastics
2013 United States LeBron James National Basketball Association United States Serena Williams Tennis
2014 United States Madison Bumgarner[4] Major League Baseball United States Mo'ne Davis[5] Little League baseball
2015 United States Stephen Curry National Basketball Association United States Serena Williams Tennis
2016 United States LeBron James National Basketball Association United States Simone Biles Gymnastics
2017 Venezuela José Altuve[6] Major League Baseball United States Katie Ledecky[7] Swimming
2018 United States LeBron James[1] National Basketball Association United States Serena Williams [2] Tennis

Footnotes

  1. ^ This was the year of the founding of the LPGA.
  2. ^ Became a U.S. citizen in 1994.
  3. ^ "Johnson is AP's top male athlete of '09". Associated Press (ESPN.com). December 21, 2009. Retrieved 2010-08-30.
  4. ^ "Madison Bumgarner gets AP honor". Associated Press (via ESPN.com). December 30, 2014. Retrieved December 30, 2014.
  5. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-12-30. Retrieved 2015-12-30.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  6. ^ "Astros star Jose Altuve named AP Male Athlete of the Year". ESPN.com. Associated Press. December 27, 2017. Retrieved December 27, 2017.
  7. ^ Beth Harris (2017-12-26). "Katie Ledecky Swims to AP Female Athlete of the Year Honors". The Washington Post. Associated Press. Retrieved 2017-12-26.

Notes

1931 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1931 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 50th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 40th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 101–53 during the season and finished first in the National League. In the World Series, they beat the Philadelphia Athletics in 7 games.

1934 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1934 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 53rd season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 43rd season in the National League. The Cardinals went 95–58 during the season and finished first in the National League. In the World Series, they defeated the Detroit Tigers in seven games, winning the last 11–0.

1941 New York Yankees season

The 1941 New York Yankees season was the 39th season for the team in New York, and its 41st season overall. The team finished with a record of 101–54, winning their 12th pennant, finishing 17 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they beat the Brooklyn Dodgers in 5 games.

Books and songs have been written about the 1941 season, the last before the United States became drawn into World War II. Yankees' center fielder Joe DiMaggio captured the nation's fancy with his lengthy hitting streak that extended through 56 games before finally being stopped. A big-band style song called Joltin' Joe DiMaggio was a hit for the Les Brown orchestra.

1948 Cleveland Indians season

The 1948 Cleveland Indians season was the 48th in franchise history. When the regular season resulted in a first place tie, the Indians won a one-game playoff against the Boston Red Sox to advance to the World Series. Cleveland won the championship by defeating the Boston Braves 4 games to 2 for their first World Series win in 28 years. The Sporting News ranked the 1948 Indians the 9th-best team ever.This memorable season was the first to be broadcast on television in the Cleveland area on WEWS-TV.

1954 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1954 New York Giants season was the franchise's 72nd season. The Giants won the National League pennant with a record of 97 wins and 57 losses and then defeated the Cleveland Indians in the World Series.

Chi Cheng (athlete)

Chi Cheng (born March 15, 1944 in Hsinchu, Japanese Taiwan), is a Taiwanese track and field athlete. She was an Olympic medalist in 1968 and was named the Associated Press Athlete of the Year for 1970. She was a former pentathlete turned sprinter.

Cleveland Indians award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Cleveland Indians professional baseball team.

Debbie Meyer

Deborah Elizabeth Meyer (born August 14, 1952), also known by her married name Deborah Weber, is an American former competition swimmer, a three-time Olympic champion, and a former world record-holder in four events. Meyer won the 200-, 400-, and 800-meter freestyle swimming races in the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City. While she was still a 16-year-old student at Rio Americano High School in Sacramento, California, she became the first swimmer to win three individual gold medals in one Olympics, winning the 200-, 400-, and 800-meter freestyle swimming races. Katie Ledecky is the only other female swimmer to have done the same, in the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio.Meyer set world records in 200-meter, 400-meter, and 800-meter freestyle swimming events at the U.S. Olympics trials. Her winning times at the Olympic Games were 2:10.5 for the 200-meter, 4:31.8 for the 400-meter, and 9:24.0 for the 800-meter distances, all of them new or first-time Olympic records.

In 1968, the women's freestyle races at 200-meter and 800-meter distances were added to the Summer Olympics for the first time. Before this, the longest race for women was the 400-meter freestyle, despite the fact that the male competitors had had the 1,500-meter freestyle race (the metric mile) for decades, dating back to 1896.

While overcoming her problems with asthma, Meyer broke 15 world records in swimming during her career.Meyer broke 24 American records and won 19 Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) national championships. In 1968, she won the James E. Sullivan Award. In 1969, she was named Associated Press Athlete of the Year. She was named Swimming World's World Swimmer of the Year in 1967, 1968 and 1969. In 1972, Meyer retired from competitive swimming. She was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 1977, and the United States Olympic Hall of Fame in 1986.On July 5, 2004, Meyer was inducted into the American National High School Hall of Fame. Meyer uses the custom California automobile license plate "3GOLD68".

Meyer is married to Bill Weber. She owns the Debbie Meyer Swim School in Carmichael, California. According to the business website, Meyer has taught swimming in the area around Sacramento, since the 1970s, and she opened her own school in 1993. Along with teaching both children and adults to be safe in the water Meyer is coaching the Truckee Tahoe Swim Team in Truckee, California.

Meyer has a daughter, son, and step-daughter.

Glenn Davis (halfback)

Glenn Woodward Davis (December 26, 1924 – March 9, 2005) was a professional American football player for the Los Angeles Rams. He is best known for his college football career for the United States Military Academy at West Point from 1943 to 1946, where he was known as "Mr. Outside." He was named a consensus All-American three times, and in 1946 won the Heisman Trophy and was named Sporting News Player of the Year and Associated Press Athlete of the Year.

Gloria Callen

Gloria Callen (December 21, 1923 in Freeport, New York – September 2, 2016), was a backstroke swimmer from the United States. She was the 1942 Associated Press Athlete of the Year.

Johnny Lujack

John Christopher Lujack Jr. (pronounced Lu' jack; born January 4, 1925) is a former American football quarterback and 1947 Heisman Trophy winner. He played college football for the University of Notre Dame, and professionally for the Chicago Bears. Lujack was the first of several successful quarterbacks who hailed from Western Pennsylvania. Others include Pro Football Hall of Fame members Johnny Unitas, Joe Namath, Dan Marino, Jim Kelly, Joe Montana and George Blanda.

List of Baltimore Orioles awards

This is a list of award winners and single-season league leaders for the Baltimore Orioles professional baseball team.

List of Boston Red Sox award winners

This is a list of award winners and single-season leaderboards for the Boston Red Sox professional baseball team.

Los Angeles Dodgers award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Los Angeles Dodgers professional baseball franchise, including its years in Brooklyn (1883–1957).

New York Mets award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the New York Mets professional baseball team.

New York Yankees award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the New York Yankees professional baseball team.

Pittsburgh Pirates award winners and league leaders

This is a list of all awards won by players and personnel of the Pittsburgh Pirates professional baseball team.

St. Louis Cardinals award winners and league leaders

The St. Louis Cardinals, a professional baseball franchise based in St. Louis, Missouri, compete in the National League (NL) of Major League Baseball (MLB). Before joining the NL in 1892, they were also a charter member of the American Association (AA) from 1882 to 1891. Although St. Louis has been the Cardinals' home city for the franchise's entire existence, they were also known as the Brown Stockings, Browns, and Perfectos.

In 134 seasons, the franchise has won more than 10,000 regular season games and appeared in 27 postseasons while claiming 12 interleague championships and 23 league pennants. Eleven of the interleague championships are World Series titles won under the modern format since 1903; 19 of the league pennants are NL pennants, and the other four are AA pennants. Their 11 World Series titles represent the most in the NL and are second in MLB only to the New York Yankees' 27.

The first major award MLB presented for team performance occurred with the World Series champions in 1903, and for individual performance, in 1911 in the American League with the Chalmers Award. The first major award which the National League presented for individual performance was the League Award in 1924, the predecessor of the modern Most Valuable Player Award (MVP). Rogers Hornsby earned the League Award in 1925 making him the first winner of an MVP or its equivalent in franchise history. The following season, the Cardinals won their first modern World Series. They won the first World Series Trophy, following their 1967 World Series title, which, before that year, the World Series champion had never received any kind of official trophy.

Tom Harmon

Thomas Dudley Harmon (September 28, 1919 – March 15, 1990), sometimes known by the nickname "Old 98", was an American football player, military pilot, actor, and sports broadcaster.

Harmon grew up in Gary, Indiana, and played college football at the halfback position for the University of Michigan from 1938 to 1940. He led the nation in scoring and was a consensus All-American in both 1939 and 1940 and won the Heisman Trophy, the Maxwell Award, and the Associated Press Athlete of the Year award in 1940. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1954.

During World War II, Harmon served as a pilot in the U.S. Army Air Forces. In April 1943, he was the sole survivor of the crash of a bomber he piloted in South America en route to North Africa. Six months later, while flying a P-38 Lightning, he was shot down in a dogfight with Japanese Zeros near Kiukiang in China.

After the war, Harmon played two seasons of professional football for the Los Angeles Rams and had the longest run from scrimmage during the 1946 NFL season. He later pursued a career in sports broadcasting and was the play-by-play announcer for the first televised Rose Bowl in the late 1940s and worked for CBS from 1950 to 1962. He later hosted a 10-minute daily sports show on the ABC radio network in the 1960s and worked as the sports anchor on the KTLA nightly news from 1958 to 1964. He also handled play-by-play responsibility on broadcasts of UCLA football games in the 1960s and 1970s.

Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year
Associated Press Female Athlete of the Year
National
World

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