Assemblers of Infinity

Assemblers of Infinity is a science-fiction novel by Kevin J. Anderson and Doug Beason. It first appeared in print in serialized form in the American magazine Analog Science Fiction and Fact from September to December 1992[1] and was published in 1993 by Bantam Spectra.[2] In 1994 it was nominated for the Nebula Award for best science fiction novel: this was the only Nebula nomination that both Anderson and Beason ever had.[3] It was also placed 25th SF Novel in the 1994 Locus Award.[4] The book is currently out of print, but is still available as e-book.[5][6]

Assemblers of Infinity
Kevin J. Anderson - Assemblers of Infinity.jpeg
AuthorKevin J. Anderson
Doug Beason
IllustratorRandy Asplund-Faith (Analog)
Cover artistPamela Lee
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
GenreScience fiction
PublisherAnalog, Bantam Spectra
Publication date
1993
Media typePrint (Softcover, Hardcover), eBook
Pages335
AwardsNebula Award 1994 (Nomination)
Locus Award 1994 (25th)
ISBN978-0-553-29921-2
OCLC27344950

External links

References

  1. ^ Contents Lists Archived October 24, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ Bibliography: Assemblers of Infinity
  3. ^ The Locus Index to SF Awards: Nebula Nominees List Archived April 19, 2012, at WebCite
  4. ^ The Locus Index to SF Awards: 1994 Locus Awards Archived October 21, 2013, at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ Amazon.com: Assemblers of Infinity eBook: Kevin J. Anderson, Doug Beason: Kindle Store
  6. ^ Smashwords – Assemblers of Infinity – a book by Kevin J Anderson Archived August 6, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
Doug Beason

Doug Beason is an American scientist and science fiction author.

He graduated from the United States Air Force Academy in 1977 with a dual major in physics and math. He started his first novel while at the Academy after returning there as an officer in the 1980s to teach physics. He is a retired Air Force Colonel with a PhD in physics. He is also a Fellow of the American Physical Society and has published two non-fiction books. His book "Science and Technology Policy for the post-Cold War: A Case for Long-Term Research", was awarded the National Defense University President's Strategic Vision award. He also worked on a few books, (e.g. Lifeline, The Trinity Paradox, and Nanospace) with Kevin J. Anderson. In 2008, he retired from his position as Associate Laboratory Director for Threat Reduction at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. He currently writes full time, lectures, and consults.

Kevin J. Anderson

Kevin James Anderson (born March 27, 1962) is an American science fiction author with over 50 bestsellers. He has written spin-off novels for Star Wars, StarCraft, Titan A.E. and The X-Files, and with Brian Herbert is the co-author of the Dune prequel series. His original works include the Saga of Seven Suns series and the Nebula Award-nominated Assemblers of Infinity. He has also written several comic books, including the Dark Horse Star Wars collection Tales of the Jedi written in collaboration with Tom Veitch, Dark Horse Predator titles, and The X-Files titles for Topps. Some of Anderson's superhero novels include Enemies & Allies, about the first meeting of Batman and Superman, and The Last Days of Krypton, telling the story of how Superman's planet Krypton came to be destroyed.

Anderson has published over 140 books, over 50 of which have been on US and international bestseller lists, and he has more than 23 million books in print worldwide.

His wife is author Rebecca Moesta. They currently reside near Monument, Colorado.

Kevin J. Anderson bibliography

The following is a list of works by science fiction author Kevin J. Anderson.

Nanotechnology in fiction

The use of nanotechnology in fiction has attracted scholarly attention. The first use of the distinguishing concepts of nanotechnology was "There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom", a talk given by physicist Richard Feynman in 1959. K. Eric Drexler's 1986 book Engines of Creation introduced the general public to the concept of nanotechnology. Since then, nanotechnology has been used frequently in a diverse range of fiction, often as a justification for unusual or far-fetched occurrences featured in speculative fiction.

Nebula Award for Best Novel

The Nebula Award for Best Novel is given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) for science fiction or fantasy novels. A work of fiction is defined by the organization as a novel if it is 40,000 words or longer; awards are also given out for pieces of shorter lengths in the categories of short story, novelette, and novella. To be eligible for Nebula Award consideration a novel must be published in English in the United States. Works published in English elsewhere in the world are also eligible provided they are released on either a website or in an electronic edition. The Nebula Award for Best Novel has been awarded annually since 1966. Novels which were expanded forms of previously published short stories are eligible, as are novellas published by themselves if the author requests them to be considered as a novel. The award has been described as one of "the most important of the American science fiction awards" and "the science-fiction and fantasy equivalent" of the Emmy Awards.Nebula Award nominees and winners are chosen by members of the SFWA, though the authors of the nominees do not need to be members. Works are nominated each year between November 15 and February 15 by published authors who are members of the organization, and the six works that receive the most nominations then form the final ballot, with additional nominees possible in the case of ties. Members may then vote on the ballot throughout March, and the final results are presented at the Nebula Awards ceremony in May. Authors are not permitted to nominate their own works, and ties in the final vote are broken, if possible, by the number of nominations the works received. Beginning with the 2009 awards, the rules were changed to the current format. Prior to then, the eligibility period for nominations was defined as one year after the publication date of the work, which allowed the possibility for works to be nominated in the calendar year after their publication and then be awarded in the calendar year after that. Works were added to a preliminary list for the year if they had ten or more nominations, which were then voted on to create a final ballot, to which the SFWA organizing panel was also allowed to add an additional work.During the 53 nomination years, 183 authors have had works nominated; 40 of these have won, including co-authors and ties. Ursula K. Le Guin has received the most Nebula Awards for Best Novel with four wins out of six nominations. Joe Haldeman has received three awards out of four nominations, while nine other authors have won twice. Jack McDevitt has the most nominations at twelve, with one win, while Poul Anderson and Philip K. Dick have the most nominations without winning an award at five.

Self-replicating machines in fiction

A self-replicating machine is a type of autonomous robot that is capable of reproducing itself autonomously using raw materials found in the environment, thus exhibiting self-replication in a way analogous to that found in nature. Such machines are often featured in works of science fiction.

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