Asian Para Games

The Asian Para Games is a multi-sport event regulated by the Asian Paralympic Committee that held every four years after every Asian Games for athletes with physical disabilities. Both the former and the latter had adopted the strategy used by the Olympic and Paralympic Games of having both games in the same city. The Games are recognized by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) and are described as the second largest multi-sport event after the Paralympic Games.

In its history, three nations have hosted the Asian Para Games and Forty-four nations have participated in the Games.

The most recent games was held in Jakarta, Indonesia from 6 to 13 October 2018. The next games are scheduled to Hangzhou, China.

Asian Para Games
AbbreviationAPG
First event2010 Asian Para Games in Guangzhou, China
Occur everyfour years
Last event2018 Asian Para Games in Jakarta, Indonesia
PurposeMulti-sport event for athletes with disabilities from nations in Asia
Asian Para Games
IPC logo (2004)
Games
Sports (details)
  • Archery
  • Athletics
  • Badminton
  • Boccia
  • Bowling/Ten-pin Bowling
  • Chess
  • Cycling
  • Football 5-a-side
  • Football 7-a-side
  • Goalball
  • Judo
  • Lawn Bowls
  • Powerlifting
  • Rowing
  • Sailing
  • Shooting
  • Swimming
  • Table tennis
  • Sitting Volleyball
  • Wheelchair Basketball
  • Wheelchair Dance Sport
  • Wheelchair Fencing
  • Wheelchair Rugby
  • Wheelchair Tennis

History

Prior formation

Before the Asian Para Games were held, a gathering known as the FESPIC Games existed and was participated by athletes from the Asia Pacific region. The FESPIC Games was first held in 1975 in Oita, Japan with 18 participating nations. Eight more FESPIC Games were held until 2006.[1]

Formation

The Asian Para Games superseded the FESPIC Games, which was dissolved alongside the FESPIC Federation, the governing body of the games and merged with the Asian Paralympic Council which was renamed as the Asian Paralympic Committee at the closing of the final FESPIC edition held November 2006 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The first Asian multi-sports event for athletes with a disability, the inaugural Asian Para Games was held in 2010 in Guangzhou, China.[2]

List of Asian Para Games

Host cities of the Asian Para Games
Edition Year Host City Host Nation Opened by Start Date End Date Nations Competitors Sports Events Top Placed Team Ref.
I 2010 Guangzhou  China Vice Premier Li Keqiang 12 December 19 December 41 2,405 19 341  China (CHN) [3]
II 2014 Incheon  South Korea Prime Minister Chung Hong-won 18 October 24 October 41 2,497 23 443  China (CHN) [4]
III 2018 Jakarta  Indonesia President Joko Widodo 6 October 13 October 43 2,757 18 506  China (CHN) [5]
IV 2022 Hangzhou  China Future event
V 2026 Nagoya  Japan Future event

Sports

Twenty-four sports were presented in Asian Para Games history, including 2010 Games in Guangzhou.

Sport Years
Archery Since 2010
Athletics Since 2010
Badminton Since 2010
Boccia Since 2010
Bowling Since 2010
Chess 2018 only
Cycling Since 2010
Football 5-a-side 2010 – 2014
Football 7-a-side 2010 – 2014
Goalball Since 2010
Judo Since 2010
Lawn Bowls Since 2014
Sport Years
Powerlifting Since 2010
Rowing 2010 – 2014
Sailing 2014 only
Shooting Since 2010
Swimming Since 2010
Table tennis Since 2010
Sitting Volleyball Since 2010
Wheelchair Basketball Since 2010
Wheelchair Dance Sport 2014 only
Wheelchair Fencing Since 2010
Wheelchair Rugby 2014 only
Wheelchair Tennis Since 2010

Mascots

The Asian Para Games mascots are fictional characters, usually an animal native to the area or human figures, who represent the cultural heritage of the place where the Asian Para Games are taking place. The mascots are often used to help market the Asian Para Games to a younger audience. Every Asian Para Games has its own mascot. Fun Fun, the mascot for the 2010 Asian Para Games was the first mascot.

Games City Mascot Character Significance
2010 Asian Para Games Guangzhou Fun Fun Character inspired by kapok A flower which is native to Guangzhou, represents strength, joy and vitality of the athletes and the Asian Para movement.
2014 Asian Para Games Incheon Jeonopi and Dnopi Black-faced spoonbill Chosen by organizers to highlight the games organiser commitment in environmental conservation. Jeonopi represents friendship with people in Asia and the world and the clean natural environment of host city Incheon, while Dnopi represents courage of the participating athletes and hope.
2018 Asian Para Games Jakarta Momo Brahminy kite The Brahminy kite is locally known as Bondol eagle. The name Momo is short for motivation and mobility. The mascot wears a Betawinese Belt with Sarong and Represents Jakarta city and strength.
2022 Asian Para Games Hangzhou

Medal count

Of the 44 National Paralympic Committees participating throughout the history of the Games, 37 nations have won at least a single medal in the competition, leaving 7 nations: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal and Tajikistan yet to win a single medal. 31 nations have won at least one gold medal and China became the only nation in history to emerge as overall champions.

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 China (CHN)5313011951027
2 South Korea (KOR)152150157459
3 Japan (JPN)115154164433
4 Iran (IRI)115118103336
5 Thailand (THA)64102136302
6 Uzbekistan (UZB)583125114
7 Indonesia (INA)476374184
8 Malaysia (MAS)415771169
9 Hong Kong (HKG)264054120
10 Vietnam (VIE)20194281
Totals (10 nations)1169103510213225

Asian Youth Para Games

The Asian Youth Para Games is a multi-sport event held every four years for youth athletes with physical disabilities. The first Games was held in 2009 in Tokyo, Japan. The Asian Youth Para Games superseded the FESPIC Youth Games which last held in 2003.

List of Youth Games

Host cities of the Asian Youth Para Games
Edition Year Host City Host Nation Start Date End Date Nations Competitors Sports Events Top Placed Team
I 2009 Tokyo  Japan 10 September 13 September 24 466 5 219  Japan (JPN)
II 2013 Kuala Lumpur  Malaysia 26 October 30 October 29 723 14 235  Japan (JPN)
III 2017 Dubai  United Arab Emirates 10 December 14 December 30 800 7 252  Japan (JPN)

Youth Games Sports

All-time Youth Games medal table

As of 2017 Games
RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Japan (JPN)1477573295
2 Iran (IRI)928172245
3 China (CHN)752210107
4 Thailand (THA)484231121
5 Hong Kong (HKG)40281886
6 Iraq (IRQ)38291683
7 South Korea (KOR)38252386
8 Malaysia (MAS)30303090
9 Uzbekistan (UZB)3013548
10 Kazakhstan (KAZ)25321875
11 Indonesia (INA)24121046
12 Vietnam (VIE)199533
13 India (IND)17141344
14 Jordan (JOR)155626
15 United Arab Emirates (UAE)138324
16 Chinese Taipei (TPE)118322
17 Saudi Arabia (KSA)114621
18 Singapore (SIN)910625
19 Kuwait (KUW)711321
20 Pakistan (PAK)42612
21 Myanmar (MYA)34411
22 Sri Lanka (SRI)3306
23 Palestine (PLE)2305
24 Bahrain (BRN)17311
25 Oman (OMA)1315
26 Philippines (PHI)1168
27 Syria (SYR)1113
28 Brunei (BRU)1001
29 North Korea (PRK)0314
30 Lebanon (LIB)0202
31 Macau (MAC)0123
32 Mongolia (MGL)0101
33 Cambodia (CAM)0000
 East Timor (TLS)0000
 Kyrgyzstan (KGZ)0000
 Laos (LAO)0000
 Nepal (NEP)0000
 Qatar (QAT)0000
 Tajikistan (TJK)0000
 Turkmenistan (TKM)0000
 Yemen (YEM)0000
Totals (41 nations)7064893751570

References

  1. ^ Closure of FESPIC Federation Archived 19 June 2006 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ "Guangzhou wins bid to host 2010 Asian Para-Games". China Daily. 29 November 2008. Retrieved 7 June 2009.
  3. ^ "1st APG Guangzhou 2010". APC. Retrieved 12 December 2010.
  4. ^ "2nd APG Incheon 2014". APC. Retrieved 18 October 2014.
  5. ^ "3rd APG Jakarta 2018". APC. Retrieved 6 October 2018.

External links

2010 Asian Para Games

The 2010 Asian Para Games, also known as the First Asian Para Games, was a parallel sport event for Asian athletes with a disability held in Guangzhou, China. Two weeks after the conclusion of the 16th Asian Games, It opened on December 12 and closed on December 19, 2010.

Approximately 5,500 athletes from 45 Asian member nations participated in 341 events from 19 sports. The games was opened by vice premier Li Keqiang at the Guangdong Olympic Stadium.

The final medal tally was led by China, followed by South Korea and third place Japan. 17 world and 82 Asian records were broken during the games. The games were deemed generally successful, with the rising and beginning of disabled sports competition amongst the Asian nations.

2014 Asian Para Games

The 2014 Asian Para Games, officially known as the 2nd Asian Para Games, was an Asian disabled multi-sport event held in Incheon, South Korea, from 18 to 24 October 2014, 2 weeks after the end of the 2014 Asian Games. This was the first time South Korea hosted the games.

Around 4,500 athletes from 41 countries competed in the games which featured 443 events in 23 sports. The games was opened by the Prime Minister Chung Hong-won at the Incheon Munhak Stadium.

The final medal tally was led by China, followed by host South Korea and Japan, while Kazakhstan, Myanmar, Singapore, Syria and Qatar won their first ever Asian Para Games gold medal. 24 world and 121 Asian records were broken during the Games. The Games were deemed generally successful with its low hosting cost and with the rising standard of disabled sports competition amongst the Asian nations.

2018 Asian Para Games

The 2018 Asian Para Games (Indonesian: Pesta Olahraga Difabel Asia 2018, Asian Para Games 2018), officially known as the 3rd Asian Para Games and also known as Indonesia 2018, was a pan-Asian multi-sport event that held from 6 to 13 October 2018 in Indonesia's capital city of Jakarta. The event paralleled the 2018 Asian Games and was held for Asian athletes with disability.It was the first time Indonesia hosted the games. Events were held in the host city Jakarta and in Bogor Regency of West Java province. The opening ceremony was held at Gelora Bung Karno Main Stadium, while the closing ceremony was held at Gelora Bung Karno Madya Stadium. The games saw the debut of Bhutan as a participating nation and the introduction of chess to the Asian Para Games' program, with the removal of rowing, sailing, 5 and 7-a-side football, Wheelchair DanceSport and wheelchair rugby.

China led the medal tally for the third consecutive time. North Korea and South Korea march under the Korean Unification Flag at the opening ceremony and for the first time competed as a unified team in some events. They also won their first medals, one silver and one bronze medal as a unified team. In addition, Philippines and Kuwait won their first ever Asian Para Games gold medals, while Laos and East Timor won their first ever Asian Para Games medals including their first gold medals. There were 16 world, 63 Asian and 246 Asian Para Games records broken during the Games.

All-time Asian Para Games medal table

Below is the all time medal table for Summer Asian Para Games from 2010 to 2018. This does not include the medals won at the other events hosted by the Asian Paralympic Committee.

Bahrain at the Asian Games

Bahrain first competed at the Asian Games in 1974. Bahrain has won 84 medals at the games, including 37 golds.

Brunei at the Asian Games

Brunei first competed at the Asian Games in 1990.

China at the 2010 Asian Para Games

China participated in the 2010 Asian Para Games–First Asian Para Games in Guangzhou, China from 13 to 19 December 2010. Athletes from China led all the medal categories, winning more than half of the total gold medals (185), the most silver medals (118), the most bronze medals (88) and the most medals overall (391, nearly 38 percent of all medals awarded).

Chinese Taipei at the 2010 Asian Para Games

Chinese Taipei participated in the 2010 Asian Para Games–First Asian Para Games in Guangzhou, China from 13 to 19 December 2010. Athletes from Taiwan won total 26 medals (including eight gold), and finished at the eighth spot in a medal table.

Chinese Taipei at the Asian Games

Chinese Taipei first competed at the Asian Games in 1954.

FESPIC Games

The FESPIC Games or the Far East and South Pacific Games for the Disabled, was a multi-sports games in Asia and the South Pacific region which is considered to be a precursor to the Asian Para Games, as two of its' edition games in 1999 (7th) and 2002 (8th) were held parallel to the 1998 Asian Games and the 2002 Asian Games.

The FESPIC Games, which started in 1975, was held nine times. The games were last contested in December 2006, in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.For Asian countries, the FESPIC Games was replaced by the Asian Para Games starting with the inaugural 1st Asian Para Games in 2010 in Guangzhou, China after the 16th Asian Games. For the Pacific countries, the para sports were included in the Pacific Games programme. The Asian Para Games, the parallel event for athletes with physical disabilities, is a multi-sport event held every four years after every Asian Games. The Asian Games and Asian Para Games had adopted the strategy used by the Olympic and Paralympic Games of having both games in the same city.

Football 7-a-side at the 2010 Asian Para Games

7-a-side football at the 2010 Asian Para Games were held in Huagong Stadium 13 – 18 December 2010. There was 1 gold medals in this sport.

Football 7-a-side at the 2014 Asian Para Games

7-a-side football at the 2014 Asian Para Games were held in Namdong Asiad Rugby Field, Incheon from 19 – 23 October 2014. There was 1 gold medals in this sport.

Hong Kong at the Asian Games

Hong Kong first competed at the Asian Games in 1954.

India at the Asian Games

India is a member of the South Asian Zone of the Olympic Council of Asia (OCA), and has participated in the Asian Games since their inception in 1951. The Indian Olympic Association, established in 1927, and recognised in the same year by the International Olympic Committee, is the National Olympic Committee for India.India was one of the first five founding members of the Asian Games Federation on 13 February 1949, in New Delhi; the organisation was disbanded on 26 November 1981 and replaced by the Olympic Council of Asia.

Japan at the 2010 Asian Para Games

Japan participated in the 2010 Asian Para Games–First Asian Para Games in Guangzhou, China from 13 to 19 December 2010. Athletes from Japan achieved a total of 103 medals (including 32 gold), and finished second at the medal table, one spot behind the host nation China.

Japan at the Asian Games

Japan has competed at the Asian Games since their inception in 1951, held in New Delhi, India. The National Olympic Committee of Japan, Japanese Olympic Committee, is responsible for organizing Japan's participation in the Asian Games. The Committee was established in 1911 and recognized by the International Olympic Committee in 1912; it is also the oldest Asian National Olympic Committee. Japan has a distinguished achievement among all Asian countries, being the only one to have won at least 20 gold medals at every Asian Games.

Malaysia at the 2010 Asian Para Games

Malaysia participated in the 2010 Asian Para Games–First Asian Para Games in Guangzhou, China from 13 to 19 December 2010. Athletes from Malaysia won total 45 medals (including nine gold), and finished at the sixth spot.

South Korea at the 2010 Asian Para Games

South Korea participated in the 2010 Asian Para Games, the first multi-sport event for athletes with a physical disability to run parallel to an edition of the Asian Games.

South Korea at the 2018 Asian Para Games

South Korea participated at the 2018 Asian Para Games which was held in Jakarta, Indonesia from 6 to 13 October 2018. The South Korean delegation was led by chef de mission Jun Min-sik, and composed of 307 people, which included 201 athletes. Korean Paralympic Committee (KPC) aims to finish third at the event with 33 gold, 43 silver and 49 bronze medals. South Korea marched along with North Korea under the Korean Unification Flag at the opening ceremony, and have together fielded unified Korean teams in men's table tennis team and the men's swimming freestyle relay and medley relay events.

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