Ashmolean Museum

The Ashmolean Museum (in full the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology) on Beaumont Street, Oxford, England, is the world's first university museum.[2] Its first building was erected in 1678–83 to house the cabinet of curiosities that Elias Ashmole gave to the University of Oxford in 1677.

After a major redevelopment, the museum reopened in 2009. In November 2011, new galleries focusing on Egypt and Nubia were unveiled. In May 2016, the museum opened new galleries of 19th-century art.

Ashmolean Museum
Ashmolean Museum Entrance August 2018
Main Museum Entrance
Ashmolean Museum is located in Oxford
Ashmolean Museum
Location in Oxford
Established 1683
Location Beaumont Street, Oxford, England
Coordinates 51°45′19″N 1°15′36″W / 51.7554°N 1.2600°WCoordinates: 51°45′19″N 1°15′36″W / 51.7554°N 1.2600°W
Type University Museum of Art and Archaeology
Visitors 937,568 (2017)[1]
Director Dr Alexander Sturgis
Website www.ashmolean.org

History

The collection includes that of Elias Ashmole, which he had collected himself, including objects he had acquired from the gardeners, travellers, and collectors John Tradescant the elder and his son, John Tradescant the younger. The collection included antique coins, books, engravings, geological specimens, and zoological specimens—one of which was the stuffed body of the last dodo ever seen in Europe; but by 1755 the stuffed dodo was so moth-eaten that it was destroyed, except for its head and one claw. The museum opened on 24 May 1683,[3] with naturalist Robert Plot as the first keeper. The first building, which became known as the Old Ashmolean, is sometimes attributed to Sir Christopher Wren or Thomas Wood.[4]

Sir Arthur Evans (1851-1941) is largely responsible for the current Museum.[5] He obtained agreement to combine the University Galleries with the Ashmolean as a 'Museum of Art and Archeaology' in the Cockerell building. It was largely prompted by the bequest from Charles Drury Fortnum (1820-1899) who insisted it was put on a sound footing. Evans found that the Keeper and the Vice-Chancellor (Prof Benjamin Jowett (1817-1893)) had managed to lose half of the Ashmole collection and had converted the original building into the Examination Rooms. Sir Arthur Evans was appointed keeper in 1884 and retired in 1908. It was a depository for some of the important archaeological finds from his excavations in Crete.

Ashmolean Museum and Taylorian Institute, Oxford; panoramic Wellcome V0014258
Engraving of the Ashmolean c. 1845

After the various specimens had been moved into new museums, the "Old Ashmolean" building on Broad Street was used as office space for the Oxford English Dictionary. Since 1924, the building has been established as the Museum of the History of Science, with exhibitions including the scientific instruments given to Oxford University by Lewis Evans (1853–1930), amongst them the world's largest collection of astrolabes.[6]

The present building dates from 1841–45. It was designed by Charles Cockerell[7] in a classical style and stands on Beaumont Street. One wing of the building is occupied by the Taylor Institution, the modern languages faculty of the university, standing on the corner of Beaumont Street and St Giles' Street. This wing of the building dates from 1845–48 and was also designed by Charles Cockerell, using the Ionic order of Greek architecture.[8] The main museum contains huge collections of archaeological specimens and fine art. It has one of the best collections of Pre-Raphaelite paintings, majolica pottery, and English silver. The archaeology department includes the bequest of Arthur Evans and so has an excellent collection of Greek and Minoan pottery. The department also has an extensive collection of antiquities from Ancient Egypt and the Sudan, and the museum hosts the Griffith Institute for the advancement of Egyptology. Charles Buller Heberden left £1,000 to the University, which was used for the Coin Room at the museum.[9]

In 2012, the Ashmolean was awarded a grant of $1.1m by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to establish the University Engagement Programme or UEP. The programme employs three Teaching Curators and a Programme Director to develop the use of the Museum's collections in the teaching and research of the University.[10]

Renovation

Ashmolean Museum Atrium Oxford 2009
Renovated Ashmolean central atrium
Ashmolean Museum Oxford Rooftop Dining Room Terrace 2014
Ashmolean Rooftop Terrace 2014

The interior of the Ashmolean has been extensively modernised in recent years and now includes a restaurant and large gift shop.[11] In 2000, the Chinese Picture Gallery, designed by van Heyningen and Haward Architects, opened at the entrance of the Ashmolean and is partly integrated into the structure. The gallery was inserted into a lightwell in the Grade 1 listed building, and was designed to support future construction from its roof. Apart from the original Cockerell spaces, this gallery was the only part of the museum retained in the rebuilding. It houses the Ashmolean’s own collection, but is also used from time to time for the display of loan exhibitions and works by contemporary Chinese artists. It is the only museum gallery in Britain devoted to Chinese paintings.[12]

The Sackler Library, incorporating the older library collections of the Ashmolean, opened in 2001 and has allowed an expansion of the book collection, which concentrates on classical civilization, archaeology and art history.[13]

Between 2006 and 2009, the museum was expanded to the designs of architect Rick Mather and the exhibition design company Metaphor, supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund. The $98.2 million[14] rebuilding resulted in five floors instead of three, with a doubling of the display space, as well as new conservation studios and an education centre.[15] The renovated museum re-opened on 7 November 2009.[16][17]

On 26 November 2011, the Ashmolean opened to the public the new galleries of Ancient Egypt and Nubia. This second phase of major redevelopment now allows the Museum to exhibit objects that have been in storage for decades, more than doubling the number of coffins and mummies on display. The project received lead support from Lord Sainsbury’s Linbury Trust, along with the Selz Foundation, Mr Christian Levett, as well as other trusts, foundations, and individuals. Rick Mather Architects led the redesign and display of the four previous Egypt galleries and the extension to the restored Ruskin Gallery, previously occupied by the Museum Shop.[18]

In May 2016, the museum opened new galleries dedicated to the display of its collection of Victorian art.[19] This development allowed for the return to the Ashmolean of the Great Bookcase, designed by William Burges, and described as "the most important example of Victorian painted furniture ever made.".[19]

Ashmolean Museum Entrance May 2017

Ashmolean Entrance May 2017

Ashmolean Museum Oxford Information Desk 2014

Ashmolean Information Desk 2014

Ashmolean Museum Entrance and Forecourt 2015

Ashmolean Entrance March 2015

Ashmolean Museum Oxford Forecourt 2014

Ashmolean Forecourt September 2014

Ashmolean Museum Oxford Forecourt April 2014

Ashmolean Forecourt April 2014

Ashmolean Museum Oxford European Ceramics Gallery 2014

European Ceramics Gallery

Collections

Joseph Mallord William Turner - Rive des Esclavons
Rive des Esclavons, by J. M. W. Turner, c. 1840
%C3%84gyptischer Maler um 1360 v. Chr. 002
Detail from a fragment of wall painting depicting Akhenaten and Nefertiti with their daughters
Taichi arch 8124242
Taichi Arch on the museum's forecourt, a sculpture by artist Ju Ming

Highlights of the Ashmolean's collection include:

Recent major bequests and acquisitions include:

  • In 2017 the museum acquired a group portrait by William Dobson painted in Oxford around 1645, during the English Civil War. The group in the painting are Prince Rupert, Colonel William Legge (Governor of Oxford) and Colonel John Russell (commander of the prince’s elite Blue Coats). The painting was acquired for the nation through the Acceptance in Lieu scheme, administered by Arts Council England.[22][23]
  • In 2017 the museum acquired a Viking hoard that was discovered near Watlington in South Oxfordshire in 2015. It is the first large Viking hoard discovered in Oxfordshire, which once lay on the border of Wessex and Mercia. The hoard contains over 200 Anglo-Saxon coins, including many examples of previously rare coins of Alfred the Great, King of Wessex (871–899) and his less well-known contemporary, King Ceolwulf II of Mercia (874–879).[24][25]
  • In 2015 the Ashmolean raised the money needed to acquire a major painting by J. M. W. Turner. With lead support from the Heritage Lottery Fund, a grant from the Art Fund, and a public appeal, the fundraising target was met to secure Turner's only full-size townscape in oils: The High Street, Oxford (1810). The painting was accepted by the nation through the Acceptance in Lieu scheme.[26]
  • In October 2014 the Ashmolean acquired a painting by John Constable titled Willy Lott’s House from the Stour (The Valley Farm). The painting was accepted by the nation through the Acceptance in Lieu scheme. The farm building depicted in the painting is also seen from a different angle in The Hay Wain, painted 1821 and now at the National Gallery.[27][28][29]
  • In October 2014 the Ashmolean acquired a collection of historic English embroideries which was given to the Museum by collectors Micheál and Elizabeth Feller. The gift comprises 61 pieces which span the whole of the seventeenth century.[30][31]
  • In late 2013, art historian and collector Michael Sullivan bequeathed his collection of more than 400 works of art to the museum. The collection, which includes paintings by Chinese masters Qi Baishi, Zhang Daqian, and Wu Guanzhong, was considered one of the world's most significant collections of modern Chinese art. The Ashmolean Museum has a gallery dedicated to Sullivan and his wife Khoan.[32]
  • In 2013 the museum was given the sculpture Taichi Arch by Taiwanese artist Ju Ming, which was installed on the Museum’s main forecourt. It was given to the museum by the Juming Culture and Education Foundation in memory of art historian and collector Michael Sullivan.[33]
  • In 2013 the museum was left a 500-piece collection of gold and silver objets d'art, including many pieces of Renaissance silverware, assembled by the antique dealer Michael Welby.[34] The bequest will be displayed in a new gallery.[34]
  • In 2012 the museum acquired Édouard Manet's Portrait of Mademoiselle Claus, painted in 1868, after a public campaign to raise £7.83million while a temporary export bar was placed on it by the RCEWA The campaign received £5.9m from the Heritage Lottery Fund, and a grant of £850,000 from The Art Fund.[35]

Collections gallery

BrightonPierrotsWalterSickert

The Brighton Pierrots, painted 1915 by Walter Sickert

Ceremonial Palette from Hierakonpolis-2

The "Two Dog Palette" from Hierakonpolis

Edouard Manet - Portrait of Mademoiselle Claus

Portrait of Mademoiselle Claus, by Edouard Manet

Raffaello, studio per la trasfigurazione 02

Studies of the Heads of two Apostles and of their Hands, by Raphael

Sobek Oxford

Statue of Sobek, the crocodile god, from the pyramid temple of Amenemhat III

Leighton, Frederic - Acme and Septimius - c. 1868

Acme and Septimius, by Frederic Leighton, 1st Baron Leighton

0 Gemma Tiberiana - Rubens - Ashmolean Museum - WA1989.74

The Apotheosis of Germanicus, a copy after an antique Cameo painted in 1626 by Peter Paul Rubens

Millais - Die R%C3%BCckkehr der Taube zur Arche Noah

The Return of the Dove to the Ark, by Sir John Everett Millais

Tragic mask dating to the 1st century BC or 1st century AD, Ashmolean Museum (8400677139)

A Greek tragic mask dating to the 1st century BC or 1st century AD. See Theatre of ancient Greece.

3 A lady singing 1740-45 Ashmolean Museum, Oxford - %D0%BA%D0%BE%D0%BF%D0%B8%D1%8F

A lady singing, gouache painting with gold on paper 1740-45, Rajasthan, artist unknown

Jeanne Holding a Fan, c.1874, by Camille Pissarro. Oil on canvas, The Ashmolean Museum,

Jeanne Holding a Fan, an oil on canvas painting by Camille Pissarro, c.1874

Heilige Familie mit dem Johannesknaben (Ashmolean Museum)

The Holy Family with St John the Baptist, brush and brown wash on panel by Michelangelo

Tombstone, the doctor Claudius Agathemerus and his wife Myrtale, from Rome, about AD 100, Ashmolean Museum (8401778336)

Tombstone, the doctor Claudius Agathemerus and his wife Myrtale, from Rome, about AD 100

Oliver Cromwell death mask- Ashmolean Museum

A death mask of Oliver Cromwell

Powhatan%27s mantle, lithography 1888

The Mantle of Chief Powhatan

Paolo uccello, annunciazione, ashmolean

The Annunciation, attributed to Paolo Uccello

Van Gogh - Das Restaurant de la Sir%C3%A8ne in Asni%C3%A8res.jpeg

Restaurant de la Sirène, Asnières, by Vincent van Gogh

Pierre-Auguste Renoir 029

A Garden in Montmartre by Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Young Englishwoman, costume study by Hans Holbein the Younger

Young Englishwoman, a costume study by Hans Holbein the Younger

Samuel Palmer - Self-Portrait - WGA16951

A self-portrait by Samuel Palmer

Domitianus II obverse ashmolean (edited)

A coin of Domitianus II

Ashmolean Museum (8401780654)

Egyptian Mummy Portrait

Pinturicchio Virgen con ni%C3%B1o Ashmolean Museum

The Virgin and Child, by Bernardino Pintoricchio

4 Maharaja Bakhat Singh of Nagaur. ca. 1735, Jodhpur, Ashmolean

Maharaja Bakhat Singh of Nagaur. ca. 1735

Cycladic figurine female, 2800%E2%80%932300 BC, AshmoleanM, AE 178, 142426

Early Bronze Age Cycladic art figurine, 2800–2300 BC.

Broadway Museum and Art Gallery

In 2013 a museum was opened in the 17th-century "Tudor House" at Broadway, Worcestershire, in the Cotswolds, in partnership with the Ashmolean Museum. In 2017 the museum became known as the Broadway Museum and Art Gallery. The collection includes paintings and furniture from the founding collections of the Ashmolean Museum, given by Elias Ashmole to the University of Oxford in 1683, and local exhibits expand upon elements of the timeline of the village.[36]

Major exhibitions

Ashmolean Museum Entrance February 2016
The Ashmolean Museum

Major exhibitions and temporary displays in 2018 include:

  • Spellbound: Magic, Ritual & Witchcraft: Open from August 2018 until January 2019, this exhibition explores the history of magic over eight centuries. On display will be 180 objects from 12th-century Europe to newly commissioned contemporary artworks.[37]

Major exhibitions in recent years include:

  • America's Cool Modernism: O'Keeffe to Hopper: Open from March until July 2018 this major exhibition of works by American artists in the early 20th-century included over 80 paintings, photographs and prints, and the first American avant-garde film, Manhatta. Many of the paintings had never before travelled outside the USA.[38]
  • Imagining the Divine: Art and the Rise of World Religions: Open from October 2017 until February 2018 this exhibition explored Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam and Judaism, and was be the first to look at the art of the five world religions as they spread across continents in the first millennium AD.[39]
  • Raphael: The Drawings: Open from June 2017 until September 2017 this exhibition brought together over a hundred works by Raphael from international collections and aimed to transform public understanding of Raphael through a focus on the immediacy and expressiveness of his drawing.[40]
  • Degas to Picasso: Creating Modernism in France: Open from February 2017 until May 2017, and featuring works by Matisse, Manet, Chagall, Braque, Delacroix, Renoir, Metzinger, Degas, Léger and Picasso, this exhibition told the story of the rise of Modernism through works from a private collection that had never been seen in Britain before.[41][42][43]
  • Power and Protection: Islamic Art and the Supernatural: Open from October 2016 until January 2017, this was the first major exhibition to explore the supernatural in the art of the Islamic world. The exhibition included objects and works of art from the 12th to the 20th century, from Morocco to China, which have been used as sources of guidance and protection in the dramatic events of human history. These include dream-books, talismanic charts and amulets.[44][45]
  • Storms, War and Shipwrecks: Treasures from the Sicilian Seas: Open from June until September 2016, this exhibition explored the roots of Sicily's multi-cultural heritage through the discoveries made by underwater archaeologists – from chance finds to excavated shipwrecks.[46] The exhibition will also featured what has been described as a "flat pack" Byzantine church interior, intended for assembly at its destination, with marble items raised from a wreck off the southeast coast of Sicily in the 1960s by archaeologist Gerhard Kapitan.[47]
  • Andy Warhol: Works from the Hall Collection: Open from February until May 2016, this exhibition featured over a hundred works, by Andy Warhol, from the Hall Collection (USA), plus loans of films from The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh. Curated by Sir Norman Rosenthal, the exhibition spanned Warhol’s entire output, from iconic pieces of the 1960s Pop pioneer to the experimental works of his last decade.[48][49]
  • Elizabeth Price: A RESTORATION: Open from March until May 2016, this two-screen video installation by British artist Elizabeth Price is a newly commissioned work in response to the collections and archives of the Ashmolean and Pitt Rivers museums, in partnership with the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art, and funded by the 2013 Contemporary Art Society Award. The main focus are the records of Arthur Evans’s excavation of the Cretan city of Knossos.[50][51]
  • Drawing in Venice: Titian to Canaletto: Open from October 2015 until January 2016, this exhibition featured a hundred drawings from The Uffizi Gallery in Florence, the Ashmolean, and Christ Church, Oxford. It was based on new research tracing continuities in Venetian drawing over three centuries, from around 1500 down to the foundation of the first academy of art in Venice in 1750.[52] The exhibition also featured 20 works on paper and canvas by contemporary artist Jenny Saville, produced in response to the Venetian drawings in the exhibition.[53]
  • Great British Drawings: An exhibition open from March until August 2015 showing more than one hundred British drawings and watercolours from the Ashmolean's collection, spanning three hundred years.[54]
  • An Elegant Society: Adam Buck, artist in the age of Jane Austen: Open from July until October 2015 this exhibition explored the work of Adam Buck, Irish Regency era portrait and miniature painter.[54]
  • Love Bites: Caricatures by James Gillray: An exhibition in 2015 to mark the 200th anniversary of the death of British caricaturist James Gillray (1757–1815). The caricatures on display will be from the collection of New College, Oxford.[54]
  • William Blake: Apprentice and Master: Open from December 2014 until March 2015, this exhibition celebrated the work of William Blake.[55]
  • Discovering Tutankhamun: a special exhibition, open from July until November 2014, explored Howard Carter’s excavation of the tomb of Tutankhamun in 1922. Original records, drawings and photographs from the Griffith Institute were on display.[56]
  • The Eye of the Needle: English Embroideries from the Feller Collection: a special exhibition, open from August until October 2014, of 17th-century embroideries from the Feller Collection, together with examples from the Ashmolean’s own holdings.[57]
  • Cézanne and the Modern: a special exhibition, open from March to June 2014, displaying Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings and sketches from the Henry and Rose Pearlman Collection[58]
  • Francis Bacon / Henry Moore: Flesh and Bone: a special exhibition, open from September 2013 until July 2014, displaying paintings by Francis Bacon and sculptures and drawings by Henry Moore.[59]
  • Stradivarius: a special exhibition, open from June until August 2013, exploring the life and work of Antonio Stradivari. It was the first time twenty-one of his instruments, from guitar to cello to violin, were on display together in the UK.[60]
  • Master Drawings: a special exhibition, open from May until August 2013, displaying a selection of the Ashmolean's on western art collection. The exhibition surveyed drawings of all types by some of the biggest names in art history, including Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael, as well as Gwen John, David Hockney and Antony Gormley.[61]
  • Xu Bing: Landscape Landscript: a special exhibition of the work of Xu Bing, open from February until May 2013. It was the Ashmolean's first major exhibition of contemporary art.[62]

Keepers and Directors

Keepers
Name From To
Robert Plot 1683 1691
Edward Lhuyd 1691 1709
David Parry 1709 1714
John Whiteside 1714 1729
George Huddesford[63] 1732 1755
William Huddesford[63] 1755 1772
John Shute Duncan 1823 1829
Philip Duncan 1829
John Henry Parker 1869
Sir Arthur Evans 1884 1908
David George Hogarth 1909 1927
Edward Thurlow Leeds 1928 1945
Sir Karl Parker 1945 1962
Robert W. Hamilton 1962 1973

Beginning in 1973, the position of Keeper was superseded by that of Director:

Directors
Name From To
Sir David Piper 1973 1985
Professor Sir Christopher White 1985 1997
Dr P.R.S. Moorey 1997 1998
Dr Christopher Brown 1998 [64] 2014[14]
Dr Alexander Sturgis 2014

In popular culture

Comics

Literature

  • Philip Pullman's novel The Subtle Knife, in the His Dark Materials series, references the Ashmolean Museum. The two main characters, Lyra and Will, pretend to be looking for the Ashmolean in order to fool a pair of police officers because half of the story is based in Oxford.
  • In Ghost Stories of an Antiquary within the short story "The Mezzotint", M.R.James makes reference to the Ashleian Museum which is clearly a reference to the Ashmolean Museum.

Stage productions

Television

  • The Alfred Jewel was the inspiration for the Inspector Morse episode "The Wolvercote Tongue" (1988), in which the museum's interior was used as a set.[65]
  • The Ashmolean also figures prominently in several episodes of the successor series Lewis, particularly the episode "Point of Vanishing" where the painting The Hunt in the Forest (ca. 1470) is a key plot element; the characters visit the painting at the museum and are instructed on its features by an art expert before solving the case.

Theft

View of Auvers-sur-Oise Paul Cezanne
View of Auvers-sur-Oise by Paul Cézanne

On 31 December 1999, during the fireworks that accompanied the celebration of the millennium, thieves used scaffolding on an adjoining building to climb onto the roof of the Ashmolean Museum and stole Cézanne’s landscape painting View of Auvers-sur-Oise. Valued at £3 million, the painting has been described as an important work illustrating the transition from early to mature Cézanne painting.[66] As the thieves ignored other works in the same room, and the stolen Cézanne has not been offered for sale, it is speculated that this was a case of an artwork stolen to order.[67][68]

See also

References

  1. ^ "ALVA - Association of Leading Visitor Attractions". www.alva.org.uk. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  2. ^ MacGregor, A. (2001). The Ashmolean Museum. A brief history of the museum and its collections. Ashmolean Museum & Jonathan Horne Publications, London.
  3. ^ "Ashmolean Museum". Pitt Rivers Museum. Retrieved 22 May 2018.
  4. ^ Salter, H. E.; Lobel, Mary D., eds. (1954). "Victoria County History". A History of the County of Oxford. 3: 47–49.
  5. ^ Evans, Joan. Time and Chance: The story of Arthur Evans and his forebears. London, Longmans, 1943.
  6. ^ Johnston, Stephen. "Astrolabes in Medieval Jewish Society". The Warburg Institute. University of London, School of Advanced Study. Archived from the original on 28 November 2015. Retrieved 5 November 2015. The Museum of the History of Science in Oxford has the world's largest collection of astrolabes.
  7. ^ Alden's Oxford Guide. Oxford: Alden & Company. 1946. p. 105.
  8. ^ Alden's Oxford Guide. Oxford: Alden & Company. 1946. p. 103.
  9. ^ Kraay, C. M. & Sutherland, C. H. V. (1972). The Heberden Coin Room: Origin and Development (PDF) (Revised 1989 and 2001 ed.). Oxford: Ashmolean Museum. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 November 2006.
  10. ^ "News". Ashmolean.org. Retrieved 8 October 2013.
  11. ^ "Eating and Shopping- Ashmolean Museum". Ashmolean.org. 15 April 2012. Retrieved 20 June 2012.
  12. ^ asa@vajra.co.uk. "Chinese Painting Gallery, Ashmolean Museum - van Heyningen and Haward Architects". Vhh.co.uk. Archived from the original on 27 May 2014. Retrieved 17 November 2012.
  13. ^ Park, Emma (9 November 2009). "Ashes to Ashmolean". Oxonian Review of Books. Retrieved 6 December 2009.
  14. ^ a b Vogel, Carol (20 June 2013). "Director of Ashmolean Museum at Oxford to Step Down". The New York Times.
  15. ^ The galleries are quirky and unpredictable, full of nooks and crannies and yet completely navigable even to the dyspraxically challenged, like me. That’s as much to do with the layout by the exhibition designers Metaphor as with the architecture.Dorment, Richard (2 November 2009). "The reopening of The Ashmolean, review". Telegraph. London. Archived from the original on 5 November 2009. Retrieved 2 November 2009.
  16. ^ "Ashmolean Museum opens to public". BBC News. 7 November 2009. Archived from the original on 8 November 2009. Retrieved 8 November 2009.
  17. ^ "Transforming: Transformed- Ashmolean Museum". Ashmolean.org. Archived from the original on 27 May 2014. Retrieved 20 June 2012.
  18. ^ "Transforming: Egypt- Ashmolean Museum". Ashmolean.org. 26 November 2011. Retrieved 20 June 2012.
  19. ^ a b "News & Events".
  20. ^ "Ashmolean Museum". Ashmolean website. Retrieved 4 March 2014.
  21. ^ Vickers, Michael, "The Wilshere Collection of Early Christian and Jewish Antiquities in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford," Miscellanea a Emilio Marin Sexagenario Dicata, Kacic, 41-43 (2009-2011), pp. 605-614, PDF. Vickers describes the whole collection, on loan to the museum from Pusey House until bought in 2007. The glass is described at 609-613
  22. ^ "Ashmolean acquires great Civil War portrait by William Dobson". Ashmolean Museum Website. 15 May 2017. Retrieved 18 May 2017.
  23. ^ "New Ashmolean portrait by William Dobson reveals Oxford's civil war role". Oxford Times Website. 16 May 2017. Retrieved 18 May 2017.
  24. ^ "Funds raised to acquire the Hoard of King Alfred". Ashmolean Museum Website. 1 February 2017. Retrieved 23 February 2017.
  25. ^ "Watlington hoard Relics purchased for £1.35m by Ashmolean Museum". BBC News Website. 1 February 2017. Retrieved 23 February 2017.
  26. ^ "Ashmolean has raised the money needed to acquire a major painting by JMW Turner". 6 July 2015. Retrieved 6 July 2015.
  27. ^ "John Constable painting transferred to public ownership in lieu of £1m tax". 28 October 2014. Retrieved 29 October 2014.
  28. ^ "Constable painting donated to the nation". 28 October 2014. Retrieved 29 October 2014.
  29. ^ "Ashmolean acquires painting by John Constable". 28 October 2014. Retrieved 29 October 2014.
  30. ^ "Museum_gets_hooks_into_butcher's_500k_collection". 27 September 2014. Retrieved 9 October 2014.
  31. ^ "Ashmolean acquires Feller collection of English Embroidery". 29 September 2014. Retrieved 9 October 2014.
  32. ^ "Ashmolean acquires major Chinese art collection". BBC. 13 December 2013. Retrieved 24 January 2014.
  33. ^ "Ashmolean Acquires Monumental Sculpture". 15 November 2013. Retrieved 9 October 2014.
  34. ^ a b Kennedy, Maev (31 January 2013). "Ashmolean museum in Oxford bequeathed £10m hoard". London: The Guardian. Retrieved 1 February 2013.
  35. ^ "Manet portrait of Mademoiselle Claus stays in Oxford". BBC News Website. 8 August 2012. Retrieved 4 March 2014.
  36. ^ "Broadway Museum website". Broadway Museum Website. 1 February 2017. Retrieved 23 February 2017.
  37. ^ "Ashmolean Museum press release for Spellbound". Ashmolean website. Retrieved 10 August 2018.
  38. ^ "Ashmolean Museum exhibition America's Cool Modernism". Ashmolean website. Retrieved 28 February 2018.
  39. ^ "Ashmolean Museum exhibition Imagining the Divine". Ashmolean website. Retrieved 27 September 2017.
  40. ^ "Ashmolean Museum exhibition Raphael The Drawings". Ashmolean website. Retrieved 27 September 2017.
  41. ^ "Ashmolean Museum exhibition Degas to Picasso". Ashmolean website. Retrieved 6 January 2017.
  42. ^ "Ashmolean Museum exhibition listings 2017". Ashmolean website. Retrieved 6 January 2017.
  43. ^ "Picasso, Cézanne and Raphael will feature in stunning Ashmolean Museum exhibitions". Oxford Mail news website. Retrieved 6 January 2017.
  44. ^ "Ashmolean Museum exhibition Power and Protection". Ashmolean website. Retrieved 21 July 2016.
  45. ^ "Art Fund What To See - Exhibition Power and Protection". Art Fund website. Retrieved 21 July 2016.
  46. ^ "Ashmolean Museum exhibition Storms War and Shipwrecks". Ashmolean website. Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  47. ^ "The Storms, War and Shipwrecks' at the Ashmolean Museum in 2016". Archaeology News Network Blog Post. Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  48. ^ "Ashmolean Museum exhibition Andy Warhol". Ashmolean website. Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  49. ^ "Andy Warhol Cultural Icon Celebrity and Provocateur New Ashmolean Exhibition Announced". Artlyst web article: Ashmolean 2016 Andy Warhol exhibition. Retrieved 22 January 2016.
  50. ^ "Ashmolean Museum exhibition Elizabeth Price A RESTORATION". Ashmolean website. Retrieved 24 March 2016.
  51. ^ "CAS Annual Award Winner Elizabeth Price's new work to open at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford". Contemporary Art Society website. Retrieved 24 March 2016.
  52. ^ "Ashmolean Museum exhibition Titian to Canaletto". Ashmolean website. Retrieved 21 October 2015.
  53. ^ "Ashmolean Museum exhibition Titian to Canaletto Jenny Saville Drawing". Ashmolean website. Retrieved 21 October 2015.
  54. ^ a b c "Ashmolean Museum future exhibitions". Ashmolean website future exhibitions. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  55. ^ "Ashmolean Museum". Ashmolean website. Retrieved 4 March 2014.
  56. ^ "Ashmolean Museum". Ashmolean website. Retrieved 4 March 2014.
  57. ^ "Ashmolean Museum". Ashmolean website. Retrieved 4 March 2014.
  58. ^ "Ashmolean Museum". Ashmolean website. Retrieved 1 August 2014.
  59. ^ "Ashmolean Museum". Ashmolean website. Retrieved 21 July 2014.
  60. ^ "Ashmolean Museum". Ashmolean website. Retrieved 21 July 2014.
  61. ^ "Ashmolean Museum". Ashmolean website. Retrieved 21 July 2014.
  62. ^ "Ashmolean Museum". Ashmolean website. Retrieved 21 July 2014.
  63. ^ a b M. St John Parker, ‘Huddesford, William (bap. 1732, d. 1772)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, Jan 2008 accessed 16 Feb 2010
  64. ^ Ashmolean Annual Report 1997-1998 Oxford University Gazette (9 December 1998)
  65. ^ "Itinerary for Inspector Morse Tour". Oxford, England. TourInADay. Retrieved 4 July 2008. The Ashmolean Museum is home to The Alfred Jewel that inspired the Inspector Morse episode, The Wolvercote Tongue. This episode ... used the inside of the Ashmolean as a set.
  66. ^ "FBI — Cezanne". Fbi.gov. 31 December 1999. Retrieved 17 November 2012.
  67. ^ Lyall, Sarah (3 February 2000). "Art World Nightmare: Made-to-Order Theft; Stolen Works Like Oxford's Cezanne Can Vanish for Decades". The New York Times. Retrieved 4 July 2008. ... the thief carried with him exactly what he had come for, a $4.8 million Cézanne oil on canvas, 'Auvers-sur-Oise,' which was painted between 1879 and 1882 ...
  68. ^ Hopkins, Nick (8 January 2000). "How art treasures are stolen to order". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 7 October 2007.

External links

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.