Arthur Livermore

Arthur Livermore (July 29, 1766 – July 1, 1853) was an American politician and a United States Representative from New Hampshire.

Arthur Livermore
Livermorea
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Hampshire's At-Large district
In office
March 4, 1817 – March 3, 1821
Preceded byDaniel Webster
Succeeded byThomas Whipple, Jr.
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Hampshire's At-Large district
In office
March 4, 1823 – March 3, 1825
Preceded byNathaniel Upham
Succeeded byTitus Brown
Member of the New Hampshire Senate
In office
1821–1822
Member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives
In office
1794–1795
Personal details
BornJuly 29, 1766
Londonderry, New Hampshire, U.S.
DiedJuly 1, 1853 (aged 86)
Campton, New Hampshire, U.S.
Resting placeTrinity Churchyard, Holderness, New Hampshire
CitizenshipUS
Political partyDemocratic-Republican
Adams-Clay Republican
Spouse(s)Louisa Bliss Livermore
RelationsSamuel Livermore
Edward St. Loe Livermore
ChildrenEdward Livermore
Samuel Livermore
Horace Livermore
ProfessionLawyer
Politician
Judge

Early life

Born in Londonderry, New Hampshire, Livermore received classical instruction from his parents and also studied law. Later, he was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Concord in 1792 and then moved to Chester the following year.

Career

Livermore was a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives in 1794 and 1795 and the solicitor for Rockingham County 1796-1798. After moving to Holderness in 1798, he became an associate justice of the superior court 1798-1809 and chief justice 1809-1813.[1] He served as a presidential elector on the Federalist ticket in 1800 and as an associate justice of the New Hampshire Supreme Court 1813-1816.

Elected as a Democratic-Republican as United States Representative for New Hampshire to the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Congresses, Livermore served from March 4, 1817 – March 3, 1821. He served as chairman of both the Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads (Fifteenth and Sixteenth Congresses) and the Committee on Expenditures in the Post Office Department (Sixteenth Congress). In 1818 he introduced a proposal to eliminate slavery by Constitutional Amendment. He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1822 to the Seventeenth Congress. He served in the New Hampshire Senate in 1821 and 1822, judge of probate for Grafton County in 1822 and 1823.[2]

Livermore was elected as an Adams-Clay Republican representing New Hampshire to the Eighteenth Congress and served from March 4, 1823 – March 3, 1825. He was not a candidate for renomination in 1824. After leaving Congress, he was the chief justice of the court of common pleas 1825-1832, moved to Campton, New Hampshire in 1827, and was a trustee of Holmes Plymouth Academy 1808-1826.

Death

Shortly before his 87th birthday, Livermore died in the town of Campton, New Hampshire, on July 1, 1853. He is interred at Trinity Churchyard, Holderness, New Hampshire.

Personal life

Livermore was the son of Samuel Livermore, and the brother of Edward St. Loe Livermore, both of whom served in the United States Congress. He married Louisa Bliss, daughter of Major Joseph Bliss.

References

  1. ^ Livermore, Arthur. The New Hampshire Register and Farmer's Almanac. New Hampshire. p. 22.
  2. ^ Livermore, Arthur. Congressional serial set. United States. Government Printing Office. p. 812.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Daniel Webster
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Hampshire's At-large congressional district

1817-1821
Succeeded by
Thomas Whipple, Jr.
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Nathaniel Upham
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Hampshire's At-large congressional district

1823-1825
Succeeded by
Titus Brown
1816 United States House of Representatives election in New Hampshire

New Hampshire elected its members August 26, 1816.

1819 United States House of Representatives election in New Hampshire

New Hampshire elected its members March 9, 1819, after the new congress began but before the first session convened.

1820 United States House of Representatives election in New Hampshire

New Hampshire elected its members August 18, 1820.

1820 United States presidential election in Missouri

This article describes the United States presidential election, 1820, in Missouri. In this first year, the state's electors were pledged to the eventual winner, James Monroe, by the state legislature. It was the first year Missouri cast ballots for the electoral college.

1822–1823 United States House of Representatives election in New Hampshire

New Hampshire elected its members August 26, 1822. New Hampshire law required a candidate to receive votes from a majority of voters for election, that is 1/12 of votes. Only five candidates received the requisite majority, and so a May 11, 1823 run-off election was held for the sixth seat.

1824–1825 United States House of Representatives election in New Hampshire

New Hampshire elected its members between November 1, 1824 and March 8, 1825. New Hampshire law required candidates to receive votes from a majority of voters for election. As only five candidates received votes from a majority of voters, a run-off election had to be held for the sixth seat on March 8, 1825.

Campton, New Hampshire

Campton is a town in Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 3,333 at the 2010 census. Campton, which includes the villages of Blair, Campton Hollow, Lower Campton and West Campton, is home to Blair State Forest and Livermore Falls State Forest. It is located in the foothills of the White Mountains, and parts of the White Mountain National Forest are in the northeast.

Chester, New Hampshire

Chester is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 4,768 at the 2010 census. It was home to the now defunct Chester College (formerly White Pines College).

Edward St. Loe Livermore

Edward St. Loe Livermore (April 5, 1762 – September 15, 1832), son of Samuel Livermore and brother of Arthur Livermore, was a United States Representative from Massachusetts. He was born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire on April 5, 1762. Livermore pursued classical studies, studied law, was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Concord, New Hampshire and later practised in Portsmouth.

Livermore served as United States district attorney 1794-1797. Livermore also served as State Solicitor for Rockingham County 1791-1793, Associate Justice of the New Hampshire Superior Court of Judicature 1797-1799, and a naval officer for the port of Portsmouth 1799-1802. He moved to Newburyport, Massachusetts in 1802 and was elected as a Federalist to the Tenth and Eleventh Congresses (March 4, 1807 – March 3, 1811).

Livermore was not a candidate for renomination in 1810. Livermore resumed the practice of law, moved to Boston in 1811, then to Zanesville, Ohio. Livermore returned to Boston, and then moved to Tewksbury where he lived in retirement until his death there on September 15, 1832. His interment was in the Granary Burying Ground in Boston.

He was elected a member of the American Antiquarian Society in 1815.Livermore was the father of Samuel Livermore, the authority on civil law and of Harriet Livermore (1788–1868), a prominent Millerite preacher.

Henrietta Wells Livermore

Henrietta Wells Livermore (May 22, 1864 - October 15, 1933) organized the first meeting of suffragists at her Park Avenue apartment in 1910, which became the Women's National Republican Club.

Holderness, New Hampshire

Holderness is a town in Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 2,108 at the 2010 census. An agricultural and resort area, Holderness is home to the Squam Lakes Natural Science Center and is located on Squam Lake. Holderness is also home to Holderness School, a co-educational college-preparatory boarding school.

Justice Livermore

Justice Livermore may refer to:

Arthur Livermore, an Associate Justice and Chief Justice of the Superior Court of New Hampshire

Samuel Livermore, a Chief Justice of the New Hampshire Superior Court

List of United States Representatives from New Hampshire

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of New Hampshire. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state (through the present day), see United States Congressional Delegations from New Hampshire. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete.

List of members of the United States House of Representatives in the 16th Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States House of Representatives during the 16th United States Congress listed by seniority. For the most part, representatives are ranked by the beginning of their terms in office.As an historical article, the districts and party affiliations listed reflect those during the 16th Congress (March 4, 1819 – March 3, 1821). Seats and party affiliations on similar lists for other Congresses will be different for certain members.

This article describes the criteria for seniority in the House of Representatives and sets out the list of members by seniority. It is prepared on the basis of the interpretation of seniority applied to the House of Representatives in the current congress. In the absence of information to the contrary, it is presumed that the twenty-first-century practice is identical to the seniority customs used during the 16th Congress.

New Hampshire's at-large congressional district

The New Hampshire at-large congressional district is obsolete, with representation having since been divided into districts.

However, from 1789 to 1847, New Hampshire elected members to the United States House of Representatives at-large:

From 1789 to 1793, three members represented the state at-large.

From 1793 to 1803, four members represented the state at-large.

From 1803 to 1813, five members represented the state at-large.

From 1813 to 1833, six members represented the state at-large.

From 1833 to 1843, five members represented the state at-large.

From 1843 to 1847, four members represented the state at-large.

In 1847 at-large representation was replaced by four electoral districts.

Samuel Livermore

Samuel Livermore (May 14, 1732 – May 18, 1803) was a U.S. politician. He was a U.S. Senator from New Hampshire from 1793 to 1801 and served as President pro tempore of the United States Senate in 1796 and again in 1799.

United States House Committee on Post Office and Post Roads

The United States House Committee on Post Office and Post Roads was a congressional committee which existed until 1946. A Select Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads was established in 1806 and made a standing committee in 1808 during the 10th Congress. The early membership of the committee consisted of one Member from each state.The jurisdiction of the committee extended to all proposed legislation relating to the carrying of the mails, both foreign and domestic. It included the determination of the location, construction, and maintenance of post offices and post roads; the acquisition, lease, or transfer of realty or facilities for postal purposes; and certain aspects of the employment and management of postal employees, such as the pay and leave of letter carriers, and the settlement of claims brought by employees or contractors. It included the regulation of the Postal Service, including postal rates, the franking privilege, and the printing of stamped envelopes. At various times the Railway Mail Service, ocean mail service, pneumatic tube service, postal savings banks, postal telegraphy, the Air Mail Service, and Rural Free Delivery were included in its jurisdiction.As part of its responsibility the committee investigated the management of postal facilities, contracts for carrying the mail, and other subjects such as the forgery of postal money orders.In 1885 the jurisdiction of the committee was expanded to include appropriation authority. The committee prepared Post Office appropriations bills from that time until 1920 when the authority was revoked under a rule change. The committee functioned until 1946 (the 79th Congress) when its jurisdiction was included in that of the new House Committee on Post Office and Civil Service.

United States congressional delegations from New Hampshire

These are tables of congressional delegations from New Hampshire to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives.

Chairmen of the United States House Committee on Post Office and Civil Service
Post Office and Post Roads
(1808–1947)
(Reform in the) Civil Service*
(1893–1947)
Post Office and Civil Service
(1947–1995)
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