Arthur Daniel Healey

Arthur Daniel Healey (December 29, 1889 – September 16, 1948) was a Democratic United States Representative from Massachusetts from 1933 to 1942 and a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts.

Arthur Daniel Healey
Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts
In office
December 19, 1941 – September 16, 1948
Appointed byFranklin D. Roosevelt
Preceded byElisha Hume Brewster
Succeeded byWilliam T. McCarthy
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 8th district
In office
March 4, 1933 – August 3, 1942
Preceded byFrederick W. Dallinger
Succeeded byAngier Goodwin
Personal details
Born
Arthur Daniel Healey

December 29, 1889
Somerville, Massachusetts
DiedSeptember 16, 1948 (aged 58)
Somerville, Massachusetts
Resting placeOak Grove Cemetery
Medford, Massachusetts
Political partyDemocratic
EducationDartmouth College
Boston University School of Law (LL.B.)

Education and career

Born in Somerville, Massachusetts, Healey attended public schools and graduated from Somerville Latin School in 1908. He attended Dartmouth College in 1909 and 1910.[1] Healey received a Bachelor of Laws from Boston University School of Law in 1913,[2] was admitted to the bar in 1914,[1] and engaged in the private practice of law in Boston, Massachusetts from 1914 to 1917.[2] On August 9, 1917, he enlisted in the United States Army and rose through the ranks to second lieutenant in the Quartermaster Corps. He was discharged on March 6, 1919.[1] He then returned to his law practice until 1933.[2]

Congressional service

Healey was elected as a Democrat to an open seat for the Massachusetts's 8th congressional district beginning with the 73rd United States Congress, taking office on March 4, 1933.[1] He was returned to the four succeeding Congresses. His name was attached to one significant piece of New Deal legislation, the 1936 Walsh–Healey Act, which regulated hours and working conditions for employees working on government contracts.[3] In 1938, he became one of the initial members of the newly created House Un-American Activities Committee.[4]

Federal judicial service

Healey served in Congress until he resigned to accept an appointment as a judge of the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts.[1] President Franklin D. Roosevelt nominated Healey on December 1, 1941 to the seat on that court which had been vacated by Judge Elisha Hume Brewster.[2] Healey was confirmed by the United States Senate on December 16, 1941, and received his commission on December 19, 1941,[2] but remained in Congress until August 3, 1942. Healey thereafter served on the court until his death in Somerville on September 16, 1948.[2] He is buried in Oak Grove Cemetery in Medford, Massachusetts.[1] The Arthur D. Healey School in Somerville is a public elementary school named after him.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f United States Congress. "Arthur Daniel Healey (id: H000423)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Arthur Daniel Healey at the Biographical Directory of Federal Judges, a public domain publication of the Federal Judicial Center.
  3. ^ Charles H. Trout, Boston, the Great Depression, and the New Deal (NY: Oxford University Press, 1977), 211
  4. ^ Richard Gid Powers, Not without Honor: The History of American Anticommunism (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1998), 125n

Sources

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Frederick W. Dallinger
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 8th congressional district

1933–1942
Succeeded by
Angier Goodwin
Legal offices
Preceded by
Elisha Hume Brewster
Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts
1941–1948
Succeeded by
William T. McCarthy
Angier Goodwin

Angier Louis Goodwin (January 30, 1881 – June 20, 1975) was a United States Representative from Massachusetts.

He graduated from Colby College in 1902, and attended Harvard Law School three years later. He was admitted to the Maine bar that same year, the Massachusetts bar in the next, and practiced law in Boston.

He became a member of the Melrose, Massachusetts Board of Aldermen in 1912, and continued until 1914. He rejoined in 1916, and stayed for four more years. He served as president in 1920. He was the mayor of Melrose from 1921 to 1923. He became a member of the Massachusetts State Guard and legal adviser to aid draft registrants during the First World War. He was member of the Planning Board and chairman of the Board of Appeal in Melrose between 1923 and 1925. He served in the Massachusetts House of Representatives from 1925 to 1928.

He was a member of the Massachusetts Senate from 1929 to 1941, and served as President of the Massachusetts Senate in his last year. He was chairman of the Massachusetts Commission on Participation in New York World’s Fair, in 1939 and 1940, and chairman of the Massachusetts Commission on Administration and Finance in 1942. He was elected as a Republican to the Seventy-eighth and to the five succeeding Congresses (January 3, 1943 – January 3, 1955).

He failed reelection in 1954. He was a member of the Massachusetts State Board of Tax Appeals from 1955 to 1960.

Elisha Hume Brewster

Elisha Hume Brewster (September 10, 1871 – April 29, 1946) was a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts.

Frederick W. Dallinger

Frederick William Dallinger (October 2, 1871 – September 5, 1955) was a United States Representative from Massachusetts and a Judge of the United States Customs Court.

Healey (surname)

Healey is a surname with several origins. It is an English toponymic surname, from Healey near Manchester and possibly also from other places named Healey in Yorkshire and Northumberland. It can also be an Irish name, originally from the Sligo area and the Gaelic word Ó hEalaighthe, which derives from 'ealadhach' meaning ingenious. The surname has a number of spelling variations, the most common being 'Healy'.

List of Boston University people

This is a list of notable faculty members and alumni of Boston University.

List of federal judges appointed by Franklin D. Roosevelt

Following is a list of all Article III United States federal judges appointed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt during his presidency. In total Roosevelt appointed 193 Article III federal judges, more than twice as many as the previous record of 79 appointed by Calvin Coolidge. These included 9 Justices to the Supreme Court of the United States, including 1 lateral appointment of a sitting Associate Justice as Chief Justice, 51 judges to the United States Courts of Appeals, and 133 judges to the United States district courts.

Additionally, 13 Article I federal judge appointments are listed, including 3 judges to the United States Court of Customs and Patent Appeals, 4 judges to the United States Court of Claims and 6 judges to the United States Customs Court.

List of members of the United States House of Representatives in the 73rd Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States House of Representatives during the 73rd United States Congress listed by seniority.As an historical article, the districts and party affiliations listed reflect those during the 73rd Congress (March 4, 1933 – January 3, 1935). Current seats and party affiliations on the List of current members of the United States House of Representatives by seniority will be different for certain members.Seniority depends on the date on which members were sworn into office. Since many members are sworn in on the same day, subsequent ranking is based on previous congressional service of the individual and then by alphabetical order by the last name of the congressman.

Committee chairmanship in the House is often associated with seniority. However, party leadership is typically not associated with seniority.

Note: The "*" indicates that the representative/delegate may have served one or more non-consecutive terms while in the House of Representatives of the United States Congress.

List of members of the United States House of Representatives in the 74th Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States House of Representatives during the 74th United States Congress listed by seniority.As an historical article, the districts and party affiliations listed reflect those during the 74th Congress (January 3, 1935 – January 3, 1937). Current seats and party affiliations on the List of current members of the United States House of Representatives by seniority will be different for certain members.Seniority depends on the date on which members were sworn into office. Since many members are sworn in on the same day, subsequent ranking is based on previous congressional service of the individual and then by alphabetical order by the last name of the congressman.

Committee chairmanship in the House is often associated with seniority. However, party leadership is typically not associated with seniority.

Note: The "*" indicates that the representative/delegate may have served one or more non-consecutive terms while in the House of Representatives of the United States Congress.

List of members of the United States House of Representatives in the 75th Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States House of Representatives during the 75th United States Congress listed by seniority.As an historical article, the districts and party affiliations listed reflect those during the 75th Congress (January 3, 1937 – January 3, 1939). Current seats and party affiliations on the List of current members of the United States House of Representatives by seniority will be different for certain members.Seniority depends on the date on which members were sworn into office. Since many members are sworn in on the same day, subsequent ranking is based on previous congressional service of the individual and then by alphabetical order by the last name of the congressman.

Committee chairmanship in the House is often associated with seniority. However, party leadership is typically not associated with seniority.

Note: The "*" indicates that the representative/delegate may have served one or more non-consecutive terms while in the House of Representatives of the United States Congress.

List of members of the United States House of Representatives in the 76th Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States House of Representatives during the 76th United States Congress listed by seniority.As an historical article, the districts and party affiliations listed reflect those during the 76th Congress (January 3, 1939 – January 3, 1941). Current seats and party affiliations on the List of current members of the United States House of Representatives by seniority will be different for certain members.Seniority depends on the date on which members were sworn into office. Since many members are sworn in on the same day, subsequent ranking is based on previous congressional service of the individual and then by alphabetical order by the last name of the congressman.

Committee chairmanship in the House is often associated with seniority. However, party leadership is typically not associated with seniority.

Note: The "*" indicates that the representative/delegate may have served one or more non-consecutive terms while in the House of Representatives of the United States Congress.

List of members of the United States House of Representatives in the 77th Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States House of Representatives during the 77th United States Congress listed by seniority.

As an historical article, the districts and party affiliations listed reflect those during the 77th Congress (January 3, 1941 – January 3, 1943). Current seats and party affiliations on the List of current members of the United States House of Representatives by seniority will be different for certain members.Seniority depends on the date on which members were sworn into office. Since many members are sworn in on the same day, subsequent ranking is based on previous congressional service of the individual and then by alphabetical order by the last name of the congressman.

Committee chairmanship in the House is often associated with seniority. However, party leadership is typically not associated with seniority.

Note: The "*" indicates that the representative/delegate may have served one or more non-consecutive terms while in the House of Representatives of the United States Congress.

Somerville, Massachusetts

Somerville ( SUM-ər-vil) is a city located directly to the northwest of Boston, in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. As of 2010, the United States Census lists the city with a total population of 75,754 people, making it the most densely populated municipality in New England. As of 2010, it was the 16th most densely populated incorporated municipality in the country. Somerville was established as a town in 1842, when it was separated from Charlestown. In 2006, the city was named the best-run city in Massachusetts by the Boston Globe. In 1972, in 2009, and again in 2015, the city received the All-America City Award. It is home to Tufts University, which has its campus along the Somerville and Medford border.

United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts

The United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts (in case citations, D. Mass.) is the federal district court whose territorial jurisdiction is the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, United States. The first court session was held in Boston in 1789. The second term was held in Salem in 1790 and court session locations alternated between the two cities until 1813. That year, Boston became the court's permanent home. A western division was opened in Springfield in 1979 and a central division was opened in Worcester in 1987. The court's main building is the John Joseph Moakley Federal Courthouse on Fan Pier in South Boston.

Appeals from the District of Massachusetts are heard by the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit, also located in the Moakley courthouse (except for patent claims and claims against the U.S. government under the Tucker Act, which are appealed to the Federal Circuit).

William T. McCarthy

William T. McCarthy (December 5, 1885 – April 6, 1964) was a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts.

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