Artemia monica

The Mono Lake brine shrimp (Artemia monica) is a species of brine shrimp, endemic to Mono Lake in California, United States.

It is a sibling species of A. franciscana, which is widespread in the Americas and also has been introduced elsewhere. The two are closely related, but completely prevented from interbreeding as they have different water requirements.[1]

Mono Lake brine shrimp
Artemia monica
Artemia monica (male)
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Subphylum:
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Grochowski, 1895
Genus:
Leach, 1819
Species:
Artemia monica

References

  1. ^ Alireza Asem; Nasrullah Rastegar-Pouyani; Patricio De Los Rios (2010). "The genus Artemia Leach, 1819 (Crustacea: Branchiopoda): true and false taxonomical descriptions" (PDF). Latin American Journal of Aquatic Research. 38: 501–506.
Brine shrimp

Artemia is a genus of aquatic crustaceans also known as brine shrimp. Artemia, the only genus in the family Artemiidae, has changed little externally since the Triassic period. The first historical record of the existence of Artemia dates back to the first half of the 10th century AD from Urmia Lake, Iran, with an example called by an Iranian geographer an "aquatic dog", although the first unambiguous record is the report and drawings made by Schlösser in 1757 of animals from Lymington, England. Artemia populations are found worldwide in inland saltwater lakes, but not in oceans. Artemia are able to avoid cohabiting with most types of predators, such as fish, by their ability to live in waters of very high salinity (up to 25%).The ability of the Artemia to produce dormant eggs, known as cysts, has led to extensive use of Artemia in aquaculture. The cysts may be stored for long periods and hatched on demand to provide a convenient form of live feed for larval fish and crustaceans. Nauplii of the brine shrimp Artemia constitute the most widely used food item, and over 2000 tonnes of dry Artemia cysts are marketed worldwide annually. In addition, the resilience of Artemia makes them ideal animals for running biological toxicity assays and it has become a model organism used to test the toxicity of chemicals. Breeds of Artemia are sold as novelty gifts under the marketing name Sea-Monkeys or Aqua Dragons.

List of near threatened arthropods

As of July 2016, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) lists 390 near threatened arthropod species. 4.1% of all evaluated arthropod species are listed as near threatened.

The IUCN also lists six arthropod subspecies as near threatened.

No subpopulations of arthropods have been evaluated by the IUCN.

This is a complete list of near threatened arthropod species and subspecies as evaluated by the IUCN.

List of near threatened invertebrates

As of July 2016, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) lists 1105 near threatened invertebrate species. 6.1% of all evaluated invertebrate species are listed as near threatened.

The IUCN also lists 15 invertebrate subspecies as near threatened.

No subpopulations of invertebrates have been evaluated by the IUCN.

This is a complete list of near threatened invertebrate species and subspecies as evaluated by the IUCN.

Mono Lake

Mono Lake ( MOH-noh) is a large, shallow saline soda lake in Mono County, California, formed at least 760,000 years ago as a terminal lake in an endorheic basin. The lack of an outlet causes high levels of salts to accumulate in the lake. These salts also make the lake water alkaline.

This desert lake has an unusually productive ecosystem based on brine shrimp that thrive in its waters, and provides critical habitat for two million annual migratory birds that feed on the shrimp and alkali flies. Historically, the native Kutzadika'a people derived nutrition from the Ephydra hians pupae, which live in the shallow waters around the edge of the lake.

When the city of Los Angeles diverted water from the freshwater streams flowing into the lake, it lowered the lake level, which imperiled the migratory birds. The Mono Lake Committee formed in response and won a legal battle that forced Los Angeles to partially replenish the lake level.

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