Art Fletcher

Arthur Fletcher (January 5, 1885 – February 6, 1950) was an American shortstop, manager and coach in Major League Baseball. Fletcher was associated with two New York City baseball dynasties: the Giants of John McGraw as a player; and the Yankees of Miller Huggins and Joe McCarthy as a coach.

Art Fletcher
Art Fletcher
Shortstop / Manager
Born: January 5, 1885
Collinsville, Illinois
Died: February 6, 1950 (aged 65)
Los Angeles California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 15, 1909, for the New York Giants
Last MLB appearance
September 16, 1922, for the Philadelphia Phillies
MLB statistics
Batting average.277
Home runs32
Runs batted in675
Managerial record237–383
Winning %.382
Teams
As player

As manager

As coach

Career highlights and awards

Career

Born in Collinsville, Illinois, he batted and threw right-handed, stood 5 feet 10 inches (1.78 m) tall and weighed 170 pounds (77 kg).

Fletcher came to the Giants in 1909 after only one season of minor league experience, and became the club's regular shortstop two years later. He played in four World Series while performing for McGraw (1911, 1912, 1913 and 1917). Traded to the Philadelphia Phillies in the midst of the 1920 season, he retired after the 1922 campaign with 1,534 hits and a .277 batting average. Fletcher is the Giants' career leader in being hit by pitches (132) and ranks 21st on the MLB career list (141) for the same statistic.

In 1923 he replaced Kaiser Wilhelm as manager of the seventh-place Phillies and led the club through four losing seasons, bookended by last-place finishes in 1923 and 1926. In October 1926, he was replaced by Stuffy McInnis.

Fletcher then began a 19-year tenure (1927–45) as a coach for the Yankees, where, beginning with the legendary 1927 team, he would participate on ten American League pennant winners and nine World Series champions. On a tragic note, he served as the acting manager of Yankees for the last 11 games of the 1929 season when Huggins, 50, was fatally stricken with erysipelas and pyaemia. Fletcher won six of those 11 games, to compile a career major league managing record of 237-383 (.382).

Fletcher retired after the 1945 season and died from a heart attack in 1950 in Los Angeles at the age of 65.

Arthur Fletcher Field, in his Illinois hometown, is named for him. The field is home of the Collinsville High School Kahoks, the Collinsville Miners American Legion team, and the Collinsville Herr Travelers junior legion team.

See also

External links

1911 New York Giants season

The 1911 New York Giants season was the franchise's 29th season. It involved the Giants winning their first of three consecutive National League pennants. They were beaten by the Philadelphia Athletics in the World Series.

Led by manager John McGraw, the Giants won the NL by 7½ games. On the offensive side, they finished second in total runs scored. On the defensive side, they allowed the fewest. Hall of Famer Christy Mathewson led the league in ERA, and Rube Marquard had the most strikeouts.

Taken together with the 1912 and 1913 pennant winners, this team is considered one of the greatest of all-time.

1913 New York Giants season

The 1913 New York Giants season was the franchise's 31st season. It involved the Giants winning the National League pennant for the third consecutive year. Led by manager John McGraw, the Giants dominated the NL and finished 12½ games in front of the second place Philadelphia Phillies. They were beaten by the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1913 World Series.

Ace pitcher Christy Mathewson went 25–11 and led the NL with a 2.06 ERA. Rube Marquard and Jeff Tesreau also won over 20 games, and the Giants easily allowed the fewest runs of any team in the league.

Taken together with the 1911 and 1912 pennant winners, this team is considered one of the greatest of all-time. The roster was basically unchanged from 1912.

1916 New York Giants season

The 1916 New York Giants season was the franchise's 34th season. The team finished in fourth place in the National League with an 86-66 record, 7 games behind the Brooklyn Robins. This season introduced a new uniform design.

1917 New York Giants season

The 1917 New York Giants season was the franchise's 35th season. It involved the Giants winning the National League pennant for the first time in four years. The team went on to lose to the Chicago White Sox in the 1917 World Series, four games to two.

1920 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1920 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1923 Major League Baseball season

The 1923 Major League Baseball season.

1923 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1923 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1924 Major League Baseball season

The 1924 Major League Baseball season.

1924 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1924 Philadelphia Phillies season saw the Phillies climb out of last place and into seventh and home attendance improving to over 299,000. Cy Williams led the team in home runs with 24.

1925 Major League Baseball season

The 1925 Major League Baseball season.

1925 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1925 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished seventh in the National League with a record of 68 wins and 85 losses.

1926 Major League Baseball season

The 1926 Major League Baseball season.

1926 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1926 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished eighth in the National League with a record of 58 wins and 93 losses.

1929 Major League Baseball season

The 1929 Major League Baseball season.

1929 New York Yankees season

The 1929 New York Yankees season was the team's 27th season in New York and its 29th overall. The team finished with a record of 88–66, finishing in second place, 18 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics. This ended a streak of three straight World Series appearances for the club. New York was managed by Miller Huggins until his death on September 25. They played at Yankee Stadium.

Benny Meyer

Bernhard Meyer (January 21, 1885 – February 6, 1974) born in Hematite, Missouri, was a baseball outfielder for the Brooklyn Dodgers (1913), Baltimore Terrapins (1914–15), Buffalo Blues (1915) and Philadelphia Phillies (1925).

In four seasons he played in 310 major league games and had 1,041 at bats, 146 runs, 276 hits, 29 doubles, 17 triples, 7 home runs, 84 RBIs, 46 stolen bases, 158 walks, .265 batting average, .365 on-base percentage, .346 slugging percentage, 360 total bases and 31 sacrifice hits.

After retiring as a player, he worked as a coach for the Philadelphia Phillies under manager Art Fletcher and for the Detroit Tigers under manager Bucky Harris. He developed a reputations for his loudness as a coach for Detroit and was the subject of an article in The Sporting Life in 1929. He managed the Grand Rapids Chicks in 1945.

He died in Festus, Missouri, at the age of 89.

Cozy Dolan (1910s outfielder)

Albert J. "Cozy" Dolan (born James Alberts, December 23, 1889 – December 10, 1958) was a Major League Baseball player. The 5 ft 10 in (1.78 m), 160-pound outfielder and third baseman played for six teams; the Cincinnati Reds (1909), the New York Highlanders (1911–1912), the Philadelphia Phillies (1912–1913), the Pittsburgh Pirates (1913), the St. Louis Cardinals (1914–1915) and the New York Giants (1922). Over his career he posted career numbers of 299 hits, 210 runs, 102 stolen bases, a .339 Slugging percentage, and a .252 batting average.

In the final series of the 1924 season, the Giants were playing the Philadelphia Phillies at the Polo Grounds and battling for the pennant with the Brooklyn Dodgers. Giants outfielder Jimmy O'Connell offered Phillies shortstop Heinie Sand $500 to throw the games. Sand rejected the bribe and reported it to Phillies manager Art Fletcher. It eventually led to the lifetime suspension of O'Connell and Dolan, who was a coach for the Giants, by Commissioner Landis, although future-Hall of Famers Frankie Frisch, George Kelly, and Ross Youngs were also implicated.

List of New York Yankees coaches

The New York Yankees are a professional baseball team based in New York City, New York in the borough of The Bronx. The Yankees are members of the American League (AL) East Division in Major League Baseball (MLB). The Yankees have won the World Series 27 times, more than any other MLB team.In baseball, coaches serve as assistants to the manager. In the past, coaches did not serve in specific roles, as noted in the position titles, such as "first assistant." The number of coaches on a team's staff has increased over the years, and coaching evolved so that individual coaches took on specific roles. Base coaches also serve as infield, outfield, and base-running instructors. Teams also have a pitching coach, hitting coach, and bullpen coach, who often works with the catchers. The bench coach, a newer role on the coaching staff, serves as a second-in-command, advising the manager during the game.Many Yankees coaches are former players, former managers or future managers.

List of New York Yankees managers

The New York Yankees are a professional baseball team based in New York City, New York in the borough of The Bronx. The New York Yankees are members of the American League (AL) East Division in Major League Baseball (MLB). The Yankees have won the World Series 27 times, more than any other MLB team. In baseball, the head coach of a team is called the manager, or more formally, the field manager. The duties of the team manager include team strategy and leadership on and off the field. Since starting to play as the Baltimore Orioles (no relationship to the current Baltimore Orioles team) in 1901, the team has employed 35 managers. The current manager is Aaron Boone, the current general manager is Brian Cashman and the current owners are Hal and Hank Steinbrenner, who are sons of George Steinbrenner, who first bought the Yankees in 1973.

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