Arrondissements of France

An arrondissement (French pronunciation: ​[aʁɔ̃dismɑ̃])[1] is a level of administrative division in France generally corresponding to the territory overseen by a subprefect. As of 2018, the 101 French departments were divided into 332 arrondissements (including 12 overseas).[2]

The capital of an arrondissement is called a subprefecture. When an arrondissement contains the prefecture (capital) of the department, that prefecture is the capital of the arrondissement, acting both as a prefecture and as a subprefecture. Arrondissements are further divided into cantons and communes.

The term arrondissement can be roughly translated into English as district.[3]

Role and administration

The administration of an arrondissement is assigned to a subprefect (French: sous-préfet) who assists the departmental prefect (préfet).

Unlike French regions, departments and communes, arrondissements do not have the status of legal entity in public law. In addition, unlike those other administrative divisions, they are not run by elected officials, but by political appointees, officials appointed by the French president.

History

The concept of arrondissements was proposed several times as an administrative reform during the Ancien Régime, notably by the intendant of the généralité of Brittany, Caze de La Bove, in his Mémoire concernant les subdélégués de l'intendance de Bretagne in 1775.

The arrondissements were created after the French Revolution by the Loi du 28 pluviôse in the year VIII of the Republican Calendar (17 February 1800) and replaced "districts". In certain periods in French history, they have served a role in legislative elections, especially during the Third Republic. In 1926, 106 arrondissements were suppressed by the government.[4][5] While it claimed it was to achieve fiscal savings, some political analysts considered the results electoral manipulation. Some of these suppressed arrondissements were restored in 1942.

Statistics

Most departments have only three or four arrondissements. The departments of Paris and of the Territory of Belfort have only one, while the department of Pas-de-Calais has seven. Mayotte has none.

References

  1. ^ "Circonscriptions administratives au 1er janvier 2015 : comparaisons départementales" [Administrative constituencies of 1 January 2015: departmental comparisons] (in French). INSEE. Retrieved 5 July 2015.
  2. ^ Téléchargement - Année 2016: Liste des arrondissements
  3. ^ André de Laubadère, Jean-Claude Vénézia, Yves Gaudemet, Traité de droit administratif, 12th edition, LGDJ, 1992, vol. 1, nr. 168-169.
  4. ^ Nicolas Verdier, La réforme des arrondissements de 1926 : un choix d'intervention entre espace et territoire, online
  5. ^ List of the arrondissements suppressed in 1926

See also

Arrondissement de Spire

The Arrondissement de Spire (German: Arrondissement Speyer) was a former French administrative subdivision of the Department of Mont-Tonnerre that was created on February 17, 1800 from territory captured from the Holy Roman Empire during the War of the First Coalition. It was abolished on April 11, 1814 and the territory was ceded to Austria and Bavaria.

It was located on what is now German territory in Rhineland-Palatinate. It contained the cantons of Dürkheim, Edenkoben, Frankenthal, Germersheim, Grünstadt, Mutterstadt, Neustadt, Pfeddersheim, Speyer and Worms.

Arrondissement of Ancenis

The arrondissement of Ancenis is a former arrondissement of France in the Loire-Atlantique department in the Pays de la Loire region. In January 2017 it was merged into the new arrondissement of Châteaubriant-Ancenis. It had 24 communes.

Arrondissement of Château-Salins

The arrondissement of Château-Salins is a former arrondissement of France in the Moselle department in the Lorraine region. In January 2016 it was merged into the new arrondissement of Sarrebourg-Château-Salins. It had 128 communes.

Arrondissement of Châteaubriant

The arrondissement of Châteaubriant is a former arrondissement of France in the Loire-Atlantique department in the Pays de la Loire region. In January 2017 it was merged into the new arrondissement of Châteaubriant-Ancenis. It had 53 communes.

Arrondissement of Colmar

The arrondissement of Colmar is a former arrondissement of France in the Haut-Rhin department in the Alsace region. In 2015 it was merged into the new arrondissement of Colmar-Ribeauvillé. It had six cantons and 62 communes. In 2006, it had a total population of 144,700.

Arrondissement of Forbach

The arrondissement of Forbach is a former arrondissement of France in the Moselle department in the Lorraine region. In 2015 it was merged into the new arrondissement of Forbach-Boulay-Moselle. It had seven cantons and 73 communes.

Arrondissement of Guebwiller

The arrondissement of Guebwiller is a former arrondissement of France in the Haut-Rhin department in the Alsace region. In 2015 it was disbanded, and most of its communes were assigned to the new arrondissement of Thann-Guebwiller, some to the arrondissement of Mulhouse. It had four cantons and 47 communes.

Arrondissement of Lyon

The arrondissement of Lyon is an arrondissement of France in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region. Before the creation of the Metropolis of Lyon on 1 January 2015, it was an arrondissement of the Rhône department and had 43 cantons and 162 communes. The communes that did not join the Metropolis of Lyon were integrated into the Arrondissement of Villefranche-sur-Saône. On 1 February 2017, 78 communes passed from the arrondissement of Villefranche-sur-Saône to that of Lyon. Since then, the arrondissement of Lyon covers the Metropolis of Lyon and the southern part of the department of Rhône.

Arrondissement of Metz-Campagne

The arrondissement of Metz-Campagne is a former arrondissement of France in the Moselle department in the Lorraine region. In 2015 it was merged into the new arrondissement of Metz. It had nine cantons and 142 communes.

Arrondissement of Metz-Ville

The arrondissement of Metz-Ville is a former arrondissement of France in the Moselle department in the Lorraine region. In 2015 it was merged into the new arrondissement of Metz. It had four cantons and one commune.

Arrondissement of Ribeauvillé

The arrondissement of Ribeauvillé is a former arrondissement of France in the Haut-Rhin department in the Alsace region. In 2015 it was merged into the new arrondissement of Colmar-Ribeauvillé. It had four cantons and 32 communes.

Arrondissement of Sainte-Menehould

The arrondissement of Sainte-Menehould is a former arrondissement of France in the Marne department in the Grand Est region. It was disbanded at the April 2017 reorganization of the arrondissements of Marne, and its communes joined the arrondissement of Châlons-en-Champagne. It had 67 communes.

Arrondissement of Strasbourg-Campagne

The arrondissement of Strasbourg-Campagne is a former arrondissement of France in the Bas-Rhin department in the Alsace region. It was disbanded at the 2015 arrondissements reform, and its communes were assigned to the arrondissements of Saverne, Strasbourg, Haguenau-Wissembourg and Molsheim. It had eight cantons and 104 communes.

Arrondissement of Strasbourg-Ville

The arrondissement of Strasbourg-Ville is a former arrondissement of France in the Bas-Rhin department in the Alsace region. In 2015 it was merged into the new arrondissement of Strasbourg. It had ten cantons and one commune.

Arrondissement of Thann

The arrondissement of Thann is a former arrondissement of France in the Haut-Rhin department in the Alsace region. In 2015 it was disbanded, and most of its communes were assigned to the new arrondissement of Thann-Guebwiller, some to the arrondissements of Mulhouse and Altkirch. It had four cantons and 52 communes.

Arrondissement of Thionville-Ouest

The arrondissement of Thionville-Ouest is a former arrondissement of France in the Moselle department in the Lorraine region. In 2015 it was merged into the new arrondissement of Thionville. It had six cantons and 30 communes.

Arrondissement of Wissembourg

The arrondissement of Wissembourg is a former arrondissement of France in the Bas-Rhin department in the Alsace region. In 2015 it was merged into the new arrondissement of Haguenau-Wissembourg. It had five cantons and 68 communes.

List of arrondissements of France

As of 2018 France contains 332 arrondissements. In 2012, the 101 French departments were divided into 342 arrondissements. On 1 January 2015 sixteen of these arrondissements were merged to create eight new ones: Colmar-Ribeauvillé, Forbach-Boulay-Moselle, Haguenau-Wissembourg, Metz, Sarrebourg-Château-Salins, Strasbourg, Thann-Guebwiller, and Thionville. In 2017 the arrondissement of Châteaubriant-Ancenis was formed, and the arrondissement of Sainte-Menehould was abolished.

Municipal arrondissements of France

In France, a municipal arrondissement (French: arrondissement municipal [aʁɔ̃dismɑ̃ mynisipal]) is a subdivision of the commune, and is used in the country's three largest cities: Paris, Lyon and Marseille. It functions as an even lower administrative division, with its own mayor. Although usually referred to simply as "arrondissements", they should not be confused with departmental arrondissements, which are groupings of communes within one département.

Articles on third-level administrative divisions of countries

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