Arrondissement of Verdun

The arrondissement of Verdun is an arrondissement of France in the Meuse department in the Grand Est region. It has 254 communes.

Verdun
Location of Verdun in Lorraine
Location of Verdun in Lorraine
CountryFrance
RegionGrand Est
DepartmentMeuse
Communes254
SubprefectureVerdun
Area
¹
 • Total2,829 km2 (1,092 sq mi)
Population
 (2013)
 • Total86,288
 • Density31/km2 (79/sq mi)
¹ French Land Register data, which exclude lakes, ponds, and glaciers larger than 1 km² as well as the estuaries of rivers.

Composition

Cantons

The cantons of the arrondissement of Verdun are:

Communes

The communes of the arrondissement of Verdun, and their INSEE codes, are:

External links

Coordinates: 49°09′N 5°23′E / 49.150°N 5.383°E

Arrondissement of Bar-le-Duc

The arrondissement of Bar-le-Duc is an arrondissement of France in the Meuse department in the Grand Est region. It has 110 communes.

Arrondissement of Briey

The arrondissement of Briey is an arrondissement of France in the Meurthe-et-Moselle department in the Grand Est region. It has 128 communes.

Arrondissement of Commercy

The arrondissement of Commercy is an arrondissement of France in the Meuse department in the Grand Est region. It has 135 communes.

Arrondissement of Forbach-Boulay-Moselle

The arrondissement of Forbach-Boulay-Moselle is an arrondissement of France in the Moselle department in the Grand Est region. It was created at the 2015 arrondissements reform by the merger of the former arrondissements of Forbach and Boulay-Moselle. It has 169 communes.

Arrondissement of Metz

The arrondissement of Metz is an arrondissement of France in the Moselle department in the Grand Est region. It was created at the 2015 arrondissements reform by the merger of the former arrondissements of Metz-Campagne and Metz-Ville. It has 139 communes.

Arrondissement of Neufchâteau, Vosges

The arrondissement of Neufchâteau is an arrondissement of France in the Vosges department in the Grand Est region. It has 205 communes. In 2013 it absorbed the two cantons of Darney and Monthureux-sur-Saône from the arrondissement of Épinal.

Arrondissement of Saint-Dié-des-Vosges

The arrondissement of Saint-Dié-des-Vosges is an arrondissement of France in the Vosges department in the Grand Est région. It has 88 communes.

Arrondissement of Sarrebourg-Château-Salins

The arrondissement of Sarrebourg-Château-Salins is an arrondissement of France in the Moselle department in the Grand Est region. It was created at the 2015 arrondissements reform, coming into effect in January 2016, by the merger of the former arrondissements of Sarrebourg and Château-Salins. It has 230 communes.

Arrondissement of Sarreguemines

The arrondissement of Sarreguemines is an arrondissement of France in the Moselle department in the Grand Est region. It has 83 communes.

Arrondissement of Thionville

The arrondissement of Thionville is an arrondissement of France in the Moselle department in the Grand Est region. It was created at the 2015 arrondissements reform by the merger of the former arrondissements of Thionville-Est and Thionville-Ouest. It has 104 communes.

Arrondissement of Toul

The arrondissement of Toul is an arrondissement of France in the Meurthe-et-Moselle department in the Grand Est region. It has 111 communes.

Arrondissement of Épinal

The arrondissement of Épinal is an arrondissement of France in the Vosges department in the Grand Est region. It has 214 communes. In 2013 it lost the two cantons of Darney and Monthureux-sur-Saône to the arrondissement of Neufchâteau.

Arrondissements of the Meuse department

The 3 arrondissements of the Meuse department are :

Arrondissement of Bar-le-Duc, (prefecture of the Meuse department: Bar-le-Duc) with 110 communes. The population of the arrondissement was 61,224 in 2013.Arrondissement of Commercy, (subprefecture: Commercy) with 135 communes. The population of the arrondissement was 44,582 in 2013.Arrondissement of Verdun, (subprefecture: Verdun) with 254 communes. The population of the arrondissement was 86,288 in 2013.

CdZ-Gebiet Lothringen

The CdZ-Gebiet Lothringen (CdZ=Chef der Zivilverwaltung) (English: Territory of the Chief of Civil Administration of Lorraine) was an administrative division of the Gau Westmark from 1940 to 1945.

Froidos

Froidos is a commune in the Meuse department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

Leuci

The Leuci were a Gallic tribe, recorded to have lived in the southern part of what is now Lorraine. They are mentioned by Julius Caesar as a people supplying wheat to the Roman army in 58 BC, along with the Lingones and Sequani.

List of French villages destroyed in World War I

Les villages détruits (the destroyed villages) are in northern France, mostly in the French département of Meuse.

During the First World War, specifically at the time of the Battle of Verdun in 1916, many villages in northern France were destroyed by the fighting. After the war, it was decided that the land previously occupied by the destroyed villages would not be incorporated into other communes, as a testament to these villages which had "died for France", as they were declared, and to preserve their memory. While three of the villages were subsequently rebuilt and are governed as normal communes, the other six are entirely unpopulated and are managed by a council of three members, appointed by the prefect of Meuse. All of these communes are located in the Canton of Charny-sur-Meuse in the Arrondissement of Verdun, and are located generally north of the city of Verdun, in the Lorraine region of northeastern France.

Mediomatrici

The Mediomatrici (Greek: Μεδιομάτρικες) were an ancient Celtic people of Gaul, who belong to the division of Belgae. Julius Caesar shows their position in a general way when he says that the Rhine flows along the territories of the Sequani, Mediomatrici, Triboci or Tribocci, and Treviri. Ptolemy places the Mediomatrici south of the Treviri.

Union of Protestant Churches of Alsace and Lorraine

The Union of Protestant Churches of Alsace and Lorraine (French: Union des Églises protestantes d'Alsace et de Lorraine, UEPAL) was created in 2006 by bringing together the Protestant Church of Augsburg Confession of Alsace and Lorraine (EPCAAL] and the Protestant Reformed Church of Alsace and Lorraine (EPRAL).While the new body is not a united church, it provides a common decision-making structure and a single body of pastors.

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